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  Topic Review (Newest First)
10-Aug-2018 04:24 PM (891)
rrrdbw Have 2017 GSA for almost a year now. Love everything about the bike. Coming from sportbike, supermoto background I thought that the only time I would ever own a cruiser style bike is when I am old gray and no longer enjoy the corners. Yes I have seen the guys on BMW all geared up with their panniers, adventure style jacket/pant, fancy helmet with bluetooth connection, GPS and upright riding position. That was something I could see myself on but , not anytime soon cause I love my sportbikes so much more.

A fast guy I know who rides a GSA talked me into test driving one. That was the beginning of my love for the GSA and the end of my sportbike riding days, After buying one, I sold my beloved GSXR 750 to my nephew . I kept the 450 EXC Supermoto/Dirt (i'm not stupid) no regret not riding my sportbike anymore. The GSA can hold it's on in the twisties. I sat on my 450 EXC yesterday after months of not riding her and she felt so small, and agile. I do believe riding the GSA will make me an even better rider on the 450 SM.


Now I am that guy on the BMW all geared up, full paniers,GPS NAV VI, Sena communicator, Arai XD with tinted visor, looking like am riding off to South America for an adventure
10-Aug-2018 10:58 AM (665)
fdbm17
Quote:
Originally Posted by Parmenion View Post
For me it was the all round character of a bike that can do everything from an off road adventure, to paved road touring, or B - road carving as well as city commuting alone or with a pillion. The benefits of the boxer engine safety in a fall, the ease of a shaft drive to forget chain maintenace, the comfort of a single sided rear suspension chain slack non-adjustment, the hydraulic clutch heaven, the electronic aids that really work, the massive torque of a big twin to ride at ease, the high resale value, and lastly the dependability of the bike, from a company that values it's customers. It is a premium bike at a premium price. Worth it?
1. It does everything I need it to do
2. It is very good at all the things I need it to do
3. I like the more unique motors (BMW boxer, Triumph triple)
4. It is a blast to ride
5. Long distance comfort and long distance creature comforts
6. BMW Motorrad Canada's demo program

BMW Motorrad Canada does the travelling truck type demo program, and you typically get about 1.5hrs on each bike (you can usually demo two per event and there are 3-4 dealers hosting events within reasonable distance of me). At the time Triumph had no demo program at all for the (then) Explorer 1200, and I was never really seriously considering the Multistrada or Super T.
05-Aug-2018 12:41 PM (737)
Direwlf
Quote:
Originally Posted by Parmenion View Post
For me it was the all round character of a bike that can do everything from an off road adventure, to paved road touring, or B - road carving as well as city commuting alone or with a pillion. The benefits of the boxer engine safety in a fall, the ease of a shaft drive to forget chain maintenace, the comfort of a single sided rear suspension chain slack non-adjustment, the hydraulic clutch heaven, the electronic aids that really work, the massive torque of a big twin to ride at ease, the high resale value, and lastly the dependability of the bike, from a company that values it's customers. It is a premium bike at a premium price. Worth it?
Just came back from Pikes Peak and the Royal Gorge in Colorado. I had my k1600GTL. I couldn't trade it off fast enough after riding the GSA. The light weight handling and the off road capability that hindered me on my 1600. I could care less about losing the radio. I could never hear it well at speed anyways.

I as well like the fuel range the GSA offers. The boxer engine is very torquey from the get up and I like the rawness of it and sound. Another thing I like is the TFT display. There is so much information and it is easy to read. I like where the GPS is mounted high where you don't have to look down so much from the road to see it like on the 1600.

The 1600 is a great bike for touring! But this bike will do it all. My reverse went out on my 1600 in Colorado. I guess I wont need a reverse on the GSA lol
29-May-2018 08:22 AM (556)
brownie I bought the 2012 1200GS to make trip to Ak. coming up in 6 weeks. I didn't want to take the 07K1200GT and drop it on the haul road to the arctic which would cost me at least 1/2what the GS cost me just to replace the plastic.

Now I have two, one for the street, one for the street and some off roading [ which I plan to get more into here in Az. where there's as many miles of dirt/fire roads as tar. Never been an off road guy myself, but the GS will get me into some back country I'd never see with the GT.
28-May-2018 05:52 AM (452)
FatCobra
Something Different

Having purchased and modified a dozen + motorcycles in the last decade, I realized that I was drawn to a certain style of bike. Ducati and KTM were prominent in my dealings, supposedly 'Sport - Standard' bikes were being modded for purely performance gain, and aesthetics! Which lead to many paths converging on the same. I remember reading someones sage advice regarding... 'A motorcycle without bags, is like pants without pockets.' At the time, I thought it was stupid. Years later, and perspective ... he was right.
I had placed too much emphasis on the same traits for all the motorcycles I purchased then modded- I owned nothing that had an ounce of utility. And as a result, after years of riding with quickness, I lost interest in riding.

I'm hoping to regain my joy in riding, Use the GS for just about anything I would use a cage for. So far I love it. Time will tell.
18-May-2018 10:40 PM (153)
Didley1jt (tl;dr) Moved for a new job in Seattle and have to commute across the ferry. Style, ride height, luggage, fuel capacity... it was a no-brainer and I love it.


For me, it was because I had just moved to Gig Harbor, WA and I need to take the ferry to/from Seattle every day. You learn very quickly here that if you're doing the ferry thing out here, then there's no better way to do it than be on a motorcycle (first on, first off, and always room... they fill up on cars at 0430 for the 0500 ferry!!).

I made the mistake of picking up a Harley VROD at first. It was a great looking and powerful bike, but an absolute NIGHTMARE for commuting. Had to fill it up every other day... had to wear a backpack to carry anything (and I have to take my computer home from work every night)... and apparently they're invisible to BMW SUV drivers. An SUV started pulling out in front of me during a turn and I laid it down. Totaled the bike, but I was fine. It was a slow low-side and I was in full gear. Just helped me build a better appreciation for my gear.

It was a bit of a blessing in disguise as I already wanted something different after only a few weeks. I talked to some riders on the local forum and a lot of people were suggesting the GS or the Triumph Tiger. I had a budget of about $8500, so I had to look for the best used one I could fine. Unfortunately, riders that own the GS and Tiger also seem to like riding them (weird!) and most of the ones I found had 40,000+ miles.

Luckily, a couple days before I was going to meet a guy to look at his 2016 Triumph Tiger with over 40,000 miles, a guy about an hour north posted his 2008 R1200GS Adventure (with 16k miles) for $11,500. I shot him an email just asking about price flexibility and he surprised me when he jumped straight down to $8500. He's getting older and most of his friends have already had to give up riding, so it was time to sell.

I've loved it ever since. The ride height, the luggage, THE TANK CAPACITY, the style... it's a phenomenal motorcycle. I do miss the torque of the VROD, but the GS is actually USEFUL. And useful beats torque every day of the week.
18-May-2018 07:11 PM (007)
finn1969 Best all around bike out there. Can do everything and anything with ease, comfort, and power. In hindsight (because I only ride roads) i probably should have gotten the K1600GT and ditched the Road Glide. The GS just isn't the two up bike I should probably have.

Still love the GS Ralleye and will keep it for some time.
16-May-2018 04:44 AM (405)
Clay Only one bike that had the fuel range and the comfort of riding Alaska’s roads...
15-May-2018 08:20 PM (055)
saughblade Not sure if I can answer the "why," so I'll instead tell "how":

From 1999-2011, my "solo fun bike" was a Buell M2 Cyclone, which just might have been the most [deleted]-eating-grin-provoking bike I ever owned. Despite the big Harley lump, it was light, flickable, and delivered truckloads of mid-range torque ("no tach, no worries; when the front wheel comes down, shift"). But... I could never really do the long-range touring with it, and when Harley pulled the plug on Buell (not that they ever particularly supported the bikes) I decided it was time to move on. Had a KLR for a couple years, had a lot of fun on fire roads with it, but faced the same problem--I wasn't going to cross the Great Prairie on that bike, and since I really wanted to go back the Utah canyon country that was a problem.

Which brings me to BMW: on a "business trip" in 2000, I'd spent five days in Northern California on a rented R1100R, and came back saying "someday I'm gonna get myself a Boxer with a Telelever." By 2015, when I was into my early 60s, I decided "someday" had come. Since I was interested in going further off-pavement, I looked at the GS (besides, sometime between 2000 and 2007, the R's ergonomics changed from "standard" to "naked sportbike," and I was more than a little cramped). Looked first at the R1150GS, but it just didn't click--most likely because I just didn't like the view from the saddle. Yes, that's a silly reason, but you spend a lot of time there, you'd better like what you see. This is also the reason my Harley is a Road King, not a Road Glide, even though my rational brain would prefer a frame mounted fairing--every time I've been on the "shark nose" Harley, I've felt like I'm sitting behind a desk staring at a computer screen. Ugh.

So... demo rode an '06 R1200GS. It was just slightly beyond what I really wanted to spend, but I got the wife's permission and went with it. I was a little bit daunted by the bike's complexity and maintenance (relative to the "too dumb to break" KLR), but after doing valve adjustments, shock replacement, brake disc/pad change, final drive drop-drain-fill, flushing the "whizzy" brake system, etc., I've gotten pretty comfortable with it. And even talked a friend into joining me on a tour of the Utah canyon country this summer!

So... why a GS? I dunno. Why not?
15-May-2018 05:52 PM (953)
montanaman
Quote:
Originally Posted by Vatu View Post
I previously had a 2015 F800GT, but I tipped it over a couple of times which cracked the plastic fairing, which was costly to repair. I have also tipped my 2017 R1200GS over a couple of times, but the crash bars do their job well and nothing has been damaged--I am much happier with its durability. Also, the F800GT was not really dirt worthy at all, and the F800GS was too tall for me. Other than that,

+Upright riding position much more comfortable for me on R1200GS v F800GT, and easier to handle at very low speeds.
+Factory Heated grips (would not have a bike without)
+Cruise control (really nice to have)
+Drive shaft (dislike fussing with chains)
+And, most important--factory lowered version available
Factory lowered suspension is what pushed me over the top on getting the GS. I don't know why other manufactures don't do the same. They would sell more Strom's, Tenere's and KTM's if there was low option. Sure you give up some ground clearance but it's not anything 90% of riders are going to have an issue with and having both feet on the ground is worth it for me.
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