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Hi all, need some advice -
My neighbor has a 2017 R 1200 GS for sale. It only has 2100 miles on the odometer and is spotless. He bought the bike brand new rode it long enough to have the initial service performed on it and covered and parked it in the garage shortly after that. I've ridden several different GS bikes and I've always wanted one, but other than a few hundred miles here and there, i don't know much about them.

Is there anything specific that I should check before purchasing it? What do I need to worry about looking at after the bike has been sitting that long? He says that he put Stabil in the tank before he parked it, and it has a new battery.

He wants $18k for the bike. It comes with the Vario bags and Navigation, and is the premium package for that year. Is this reasonable or is it high? I'm thinking this price looks a bit on the high side but the bike is essentially new so it's hard to argue with it. Am I way off base? Just need some advice.

Thoughts?
 

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At 18K the asking price is maybe at the upper ends but it's the asking price not a selling price

The bike probably should see some fluids changed as they are now getting to be in the 5-year-old range. It's your call on the tires if they should be replaced due to aging out. Some people live/die by the 5-year rule others like me look at the condition of the tire. If still soft and pliable I'm good with them but I;d still use them as leverage to negotiate a lower price

The Vario bags IMO add zero value, but I do not like Vario bags in the slightest. They are bulky, heavy, overly complicated and the interior space is small due to the expansion mechanism. 1st thing I'd do is sell them and buy a set of metal panniers the down-side is even after you sell the Vario's you are looking down the barrel of $1000 bill for something decent or wait for something used to come up and save a few hundred dollars.

To sum it up I'd ask the seller if he wants 18K for it new tires and a fresh service included or offer 16.5K as is. As soon as he mentions we'll its only got 2,000 miles on it, tell him that is great, but it still needs some attention from lack of use.
 

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Hi all, need some advice -
My neighbor has a 2017 R 1200 GS for sale. It only has 2100 miles on the odometer and is spotless. He bought the bike brand new rode it long enough to have the initial service performed on it and covered and parked it in the garage shortly after that. I've ridden several different GS bikes and I've always wanted one, but other than a few hundred miles here and there, i don't know much about them.

Is there anything specific that I should check before purchasing it? What do I need to worry about looking at after the bike has been sitting that long? He says that he put Stabil in the tank before he parked it, and it has a new battery.

He wants $18k for the bike. It comes with the Vario bags and Navigation, and is the premium package for that year. Is this reasonable or is it high? I'm thinking this price looks a bit on the high side but the bike is essentially new so it's hard to argue with it. Am I way off base? Just need some advice.

Thoughts?
Around here, $18K for a GS with 25K miles is the norm. And it will have the normal wear and tear that a 5 year old bike will have. Make an offer, you've got nothing to lose.

Drain the plastic fuel tank, change the fluids, (change the tires within the next year) and ride it.

Found a 2011 GS with 3500 miles this spring. A Dr. owned, mint garage queen...with the original tires! It went in for service regularly (not sure why the dealer didn't catch the tires). Changed fluids, tires, and TPMS sensors. Wouldn't think twice about taking it cross country.
 

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At 18K the asking price is maybe at the upper ends but it's the asking price not a selling price

The bike probably should see some fluids changed as they are now getting to be in the 5-year-old range. It's your call on the tires if they should be replaced due to aging out. Some people live/die by the 5-year rule others like me look at the condition of the tire. If still soft and pliable I'm good with them but I;d still use them as leverage to negotiate a lower price

The Vario bags IMO add zero value, but I do not like Vario bags in the slightest. They are bulky, heavy, overly complicated and the interior space is small due to the expansion mechanism. 1st thing I'd do is sell them and buy a set of metal panniers the down-side is even after you sell the Vario's you are looking down the barrel of $1000 bill for something decent or wait for something used to come up and save a few hundred dollars.

To sum it up I'd ask the seller if he wants 18K for it new tires and a fresh service included or offer 16.5K as is. As soon as he mentions we'll its only got 2,000 miles on it, tell him that is great, but it still needs some attention from lack of use.
Sounds high to me. I bought a 2015 with 18K in mint condition, all the same extras along with Clearwater lights, brake lights, crash bars, bash plate and several other do dads for $12.5. Dealer would offer about $10K so $15K fair offer.
 

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Here’s my advice that will provide more food for thought than answers.

When I was looking for a GS about this time last year, there were very few bikes for sale, which is unchanged. Supply issues have limited new bikes which has provided upward pressure on the prices, IMO. But, that does vary depending on your location. When searching the ads, some areas has a lot more bikes than others. Low supply in your local area can provide upward pressure on the price. Consequently, bikes sold at the top of the range. KBB indicates the trade in about a bit under $14k, and list price at a bit over $18k, for bikes in good condition with typical mileage. The bike has low mileage that would put upward pressure on the value, but how much is anyone’s guess. Every once and while I check the local listings (SF Bay Area) for bikes, and the bikes at the price typically have higher mileage. However, nationally, bikes can be purchased for less in some areas, but then you need to factor in the flight and return ride costs. While I’m no expert, the asking price appears to me to be at the top of the range for the bike given its condition and mileage. That doesn’t mean you can’t negotiate lower, and I would given that all the fluids should be changed.

When I first saw the listing for the bike I ended up buying, I thought it was a bit overpriced (seller dropped his asking price eventually). I was also concerned that the bike wasn’t really broken in (the bike had about 1,500 miles) and there was no warranty time frame remaining. As such, any issues that came up would most likely all me on my dime. This concerned me a bit especially with the cam lobe and follower issue that is very expensive to repair. You can read more about it online. (2) Rocker arms causing notching on cams? | R1200GS Forum While not all bikes are affected, this issue would most likely not show itself on low mileage bikes.

I had all the fluids changed (engine oil, final drive oil, coolant and brake fluid flush). You should have the same done given the age. This way you will no when it was done and give you peace of mind. Tires are an issue and may need to be replaced before you can wear them, depending on how much you ride. As ParazziMx14 said, some people live/die by the 5-year rule on tires. However, some manufacturers indicate their tires are good for 10 years. If you’re mostly a fair weather rider, it’s less of an issue, but wet surfaces become more of an issue with older tires. It’s your call here.

As far as accessories go, that’s all personal preference, IMO. Some people love or hate the Vario bags. Same for the metal panniers. I like the Vario bags, but I ride mostly on pavement. If I were to do a lot of off road riding, I’d probably get soft bags over the metal ones. That’s all personal preference and what works for you. Some say it’s best to get a bike with all the farkles/accessories, since they add minimal value to the bike, but are expensive. However, I’ve also talked to some who prefer to buy bikes without any, because they have strong preferences on which are best and would rather accessorize their bikes themselves.

Here's another bit to consider. How do you plan on using it? Lots of off road or mostly on pavement. If you plan to do a lot of off road riding, you might want to consider getting a bike with more miles and a bit of patina (aka bumps and bruises). As you learn to ride off road, you will drop the bike, and it’s best not paying top dollar for a pristine bike for the bike you learn on. However, if you plan to ride it mostly on pavement, then it maybe less of an issue.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
That cam wear thread is insane. I've never seen anything like it.

I will mostly use the bike on the highway, but I am also planning on doing a trip across BC into Alaska and plan on doing the Dempster and the Haul Road. That is about the most "off-road' I will be doing. Most of my riding is long distance, sometimes consecutive 1k mile days. That's why this bike caught my eye with the low miles. The vario bags aren't really a necessity as I already have some Happy Trails bags that I plan on using. The Navigation is nice, but not really a huge motivator for me. I've got a Garmin XT that I will use. I've not really read much about the BMW navigation, but the impression that I have is that it's essentially an outdated garmin model no longer produced. Is this correct?

I really love the ergonomics of these bikes. They tend to be much more comfortable for my body style and I loved them from the first time I rode one. At this point I'm also looking at the Adventure models. I like the expanded tank, and I would probably end up spending money to outfit a GS like an Adventure anyway.

Thanks everyone for your insight. We will see what happens.
 

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If you want a GSA get a GSA. Buying a GS and adding crash bars and some other accessories the GSA has is easy and relatively inexpensive, but it doesn't get you the fuel capacity of the GSA. Adding a slave tank is not hard and can be inexpensive but it takes up space on the rear of the bike.

I built a 12L/3gal slave tank that clips into the pillion of either my GS or GSA. With the filler necks drilled and the 12L tank (actually holds more like 15L) it takes the GS to over 8 gallons and the GSA to a little over 13 gallons, but it still takes up the pillion area.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
If you want a GSA get a GSA. Buying a GS and adding crash bars and some other accessories the GSA has is easy and relatively inexpensive, but it doesn't get you the fuel capacity of the GSA. Adding a slave tank is not hard and can be inexpensive but it takes up space on the rear of the bike.

I built a 12L/3gal slave tank that clips into the pillion of either my GS or GSA. With the filler necks drilled and the 12L tank (actually holds more like 15L) it takes the GS to over 8 gallons and the GSA to a little over 13 gallons, but it still takes up the pillion area.
I agree. I had Vstrom DL650 that I plumbed in extra 4 gallon tanks so I wouldn't have to stop and get gas as often on long trips. It wasn't hard to do, but on the Vstrom I had to drill into the main tank which I didn't like doing. I like the idea of the expanded tank on the GSA, and I really think that is the way to go for me. The GS/GSA was the only bike that I've ridden so far where I was instantly comfortable. I've had several other bikes and each one I had put in money and time to make them fit me. After riding the GS the only thing that I think I may need is a seat upgrade, and the seat seems decent enough that I may be able to put that off for awhile.

Thanks for your insight.
 

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Agree with offering 16 or 16.5k. I also would not worry about the tire age if they look and feel good. I happen to like the vario cases. Narrow most of the time but hold a bunch at a moment’s notice when needed, including a full face helmet. Also, no rack means you can switch over to rackless soft bags for offroad use within minutes, something I do several times each season.
 

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Give an extended warranty a thought as you have an expensive bike with asininely expensive BMW parts should anything go wrong. Fortunately for a 2017 there may be some second hand eBay options should you need them.

Agree on the 16k offer as you don't know what all the parked time may cause issues with. I just bought a bike that sat for 6 years and pretty certain the front tire has a flat spot that I need to deal with.
 

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Bought mine just shy of 2 months ago for $14k with 2400 miles (now has 6,600 on it). Rear brake was non-existent, flushed the fluid and it's been fine ever since.

Vairo cases are ok for work commute and on road travel. Looking at adding racks with mosko backcountry or lone rider panniers...but engine bars are on the top of the 'things to get list' as I found out I CAN pick up the bike when it takes a nap (unfortunately it was on asphalt 😣). BMW GPS unit, meh....only thing I like about it is the 'my motorcycle' info pages. I have a zumo XT it's a much better GPS unit. Keyless ride, I could do without. All the other 'conveniences' I really like (cruise control, ESA, and heated grips).
 

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sounds high to me also, and 2100 miles is still in the shakedown of the bike. Of course I DO have a conflict of interests as I have my 16 for sale here on the forum, road ready with new tires and a new battery and the bells and whistles.
 

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I agree. I had Vstrom DL650 that I plumbed in extra 4 gallon tanks so I wouldn't have to stop and get gas as often on long trips. It wasn't hard to do, but on the Vstrom I had to drill into the main tank which I didn't like doing. I like the idea of the expanded tank on the GSA, and I really think that is the way to go for me. The GS/GSA was the only bike that I've ridden so far where I was instantly comfortable. I've had several other bikes and each one I had put in money and time to make them fit me. After riding the GS the only thing that I think I may need is a seat upgrade, and the seat seems decent enough that I may be able to put that off for awhile.

Thanks for your insight.
You can add a fuel cell to almost any bike w/o the need for drilling and installing another bung in the tank. Simply connect the fuel line from the slave tank to the vent line on the main tank and it will pull the fuel in from the slave tank as you consume fuel in the main fuel cell. The beauty is no mechanics or potential for overfilling the main tank.
 

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What is the manufacture date? There was a significant update mid year giving you the same ESA as a 2018. Mine was built in August and if this bike is a 2017.5 then it’s worth 17k in today’s market. Lots of good advice on immediate services to be performed before riding, tires should probably be upgraded anyway to Michelin Road6s or Dunlop TMM…jm$.02
 

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Hi all, need some advice -
My neighbor has a 2017 R 1200 GS for sale. It only has 2100 miles on the odometer and is spotless. He bought the bike brand new rode it long enough to have the initial service performed on it and covered and parked it in the garage shortly after that. I've ridden several different GS bikes and I've always wanted one, but other than a few hundred miles here and there, i don't know much about them.

Is there anything specific that I should check before purchasing it? What do I need to worry about looking at after the bike has been sitting that long? He says that he put Stabil in the tank before he parked it, and it has a new battery.

He wants $18k for the bike. It comes with the Vario bags and Navigation, and is the premium package for that year. Is this reasonable or is it high? I'm thinking this price looks a bit on the high side but the bike is essentially new so it's hard to argue with it. Am I way off base? Just need some advice.

Thoughts?
I purchased a ‘17 GSA in 2018 with 1000 miles fully equipped with ride pro etc. Also had BMW hard cases and top case. Paid $19000. It was a good deal at the time I thought. I haven’t followed the used market of late, but that price is high. Make sure the fork seals are in good shape.
 

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I was at the dealer in Anchorage Ak looking at used bikes one day in September last year and a 2015 GS had literally just come in on consignment with 1900 miles , one owner who couldn’t ride anymore. I was planning on leaving on my 03 1150 GS in two days riding to California and Nevada. It looked and rode like new with a vario top box but no panniers but had crash bars and running lights. just had to fill the tires and after a bit of haggling got it for 13,500 . I rode it home transferred the title the next day and left anchorage on time the same day as receiving the title and new plate. Had a great ride with no issues and put 4400 miles on it in 9 days. Stopped at touratech store and bought then installed touratec racks and aluminum panniers for 1500 bucks. I did a service myself (fluid changes, air filter ) while the panniers were being installed. I have since ridden the bike around the southwest ( Nevada, Utah , Arizona and Colorado ) adding another 3500 miles to the original tires with no issues other than a new battery last year ( always keep it on a ctek charger) Just put new tires and total mileage now is 9900 miles. The point is make an offer and go ride and enjoy …
 

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I purchased a ‘17 GSA in 2018 with 1000 miles fully equipped with ride pro etc. Also had BMW hard cases and top case. Paid $19000. It was a good deal at the time I thought. I haven’t followed the used market of late, but that price is high. Make sure the fork seals are in good shape.
I love when people tell you you paid to much or a bike isn't worth the asking price. It's worth exactly what you are willing to pay. Be happy with your purchase and to hell with everyone else. I just paid $18K for a 2017 GSA, with only 254 miles, with GPS and BMW panniers. My neighbor called me crazy, I just smile as I ride away.
 

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I love when people tell you you paid to much or a bike isn't worth the asking price. It's worth exactly what you are willing to pay. Be happy with your purchase and to hell with everyone else. I just paid $18K for a 2017 GSA, with only 254 miles, with GPS and BMW panniers. My neighbor called me crazy, I just smile as I ride away.
This exactly. I paid $18k for my 2017 GSA last March. It had 20k miles on it, and I've put 11k more on it since. IDGAF what anyone else thinks about it. It's the perfect bike for me!
 

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I love when people tell you you paid to much or a bike isn't worth the asking price. It's worth exactly what you are willing to pay. Be happy with your purchase and to hell with everyone else. I just paid $18K for a 2017 GSA, with only 254 miles, with GPS and BMW panniers. My neighbor called me crazy, I just smile as I ride away.

This exactly. I paid $18k for my 2017 GSA last March. It had 20k miles on it, and I've put 11k more on it since. IDGAF what anyone else thinks about it. It's the perfect bike for me!
+1. Value is a range, not a point. Just because someone pays for something at the high end of the range doesn't make it a bad deal. There are many things that factor into it. The bottom line is whether or not the buyer/you are happy with the purchase.
 
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