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I like the color combo of those boots!

A bit about me that might that might help understand my choice(s)...

I live at the base of the Colorado Rockies. I ride quite a bit of off-road. Just about every one of my rides takes me up into the mountains or offroad into the plains. I've ridden the COBDR and other great "trails" here in CO.

I have two different sets of boots and wear a different pair depending where I'm riding. I've got the Sidi Crossfire 2 and Alpinestar Toucans.

If my ride is a "serious ride" which takes me on long sections of off-road or sections that I know are challenging its the Sidi Crossfires. If its just some well maintained forest service roads/logging roads, more on-road, some walking, hanging out then the Toucans...

With that said, I wouldn't do the Toucans again. IMO its allows too much side-to-side ankle movement. It doesn't offer enough ankle protection and allows your ankle to "roll" too easily. From what I've seen its low-speed crashes that do the most damage to lower legs. Wearing Toucans (before I bought the Sidis) riding on a muddy section of trail I dropped my bike (at the time a Super Tenere), the engine case trapped my ankle as I rolled. It fractured my ankle. Another buddy of mine had something similar happen to him and he completely broke his ankle. His boots while not Toucans were of a similar build. Looking back I'd have gone with the Sidi Adventure Gore-tex or Rain as they have better ankle support.

After my ankle healed I bought the Sidi Crossfires. They've already paid for themselves. I was riding solo and dropped my bike on a steep rocky section. The same leg was trapped under the bike with a hard part sitting right on the ankle. No pain, no injury. I couldn't pull my leg out from under the bike. I had to use my other leg to push on the seat to lift the bike enough to pull my leg out.

The Toucans are super comfortable and I still wear them when doing what I consider "light" rides. I have no fit or comfort issues with them. I could walk in them all day or hang out in them all day.

The Sidis are a slightly different story. They fit and feel like a ski boot. You can feel it wrap around your lower leg. They allow very little movement at the ankle. One area that I had to get used to with these boots is shifting. When you first put them on and do a few upshifts you realize you need to use more effort to flex the boot to make it happen. But after a few upshifts, you get used to it. Walking, again, is very much like a ski boot. You can do it, but its not easy and after a little while they aren't very comfortable. Also if you have very large calfs, fit may be an issue so make sure you try them on first. I also found I had to go up almost a full size from what I normally wear to get a comfortable/proper fit. I have average width feet so that wasn't the issue. They just felt small in all dimensions. These are great boots and I'd buy them again.

Thats just my .02...



What kind of Boots are you guys wearing??

I'm in the market for a new pair after todays tumble.

 

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Forma Adventure low for touring and tarmac, Sidi Adventure rain for more off-road adventure trips, but dang do they squeak and they flex very little, so not good for walking - I'll usually pack an extra pair of shoes when I ride with those. Both are waterproof and I feel pretty protected when wearing them.
 

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Sidi boots look great and are quality products it's too bad that they don't make them in wide sizes, my wide foot make it very hard to find boots I like that fit.
I also ride and hike a lot, and spend the whole day in the saddle often and am not ashamed to admit that I normally don't wear motorcycle specific boots, they are uncomfortable, too difficult to get on and off, to limiting and next to impossible to find a suitable pair in my size.
I have a pair of Asolo hiking boots that I wear and accept the risks.
 

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And did you do any adjustments to the shifter to make it easier? I had an issue with that on my last bike, so I've not tried my Forma's on this bike yet.
 

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I use Rev'it Discovery Outdry. They are hybrids. Very comfortable, waterproof, protected, and the BOA closure tightens the boot with a turn of one knob, unfastens with one click. I hike a lot off bike and simply carry running shoes and tuck these in my cans when I am off bike. I've fitted myself into and prefer Crossfire 3 SRS but their soles are unusable on wet road surfaces, otherwise cannot be beat for comfort, protection, durability. Crossfire SRS 2's sole can be swapped for MX soles (via simple unscrew n rescrew) and then are usable on road but the 2s do not offer the same ankle limiter as the 3s.

The only time I want waterproofing is winter. So the crossfires would be fine in any 3 season application in Colorado. If all I were doing is offload, Crossfire 3 SRS would be the undoubted choice. (As Jet says however, very thin.)
 

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Long had my eye on those Forma boots. Even the low looks appealing, I'd be reprimanded at StarBucks's for not having higher boots.:grin2:
 

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And did you do any adjustments to the shifter to make it easier? I had an issue with that on my last bike, so I've not tried my Forma's on this bike yet.
Shifting was an adventure, no pun, the first couple rides. Eventually works out.
The toe area is much larger on the Terra and other adventure boots, then touring boots and you have to really flex your ankle down to get it under the shifter.
I guess you could move the shifter to accommodate, but then when you revert back to touring boots you would have to compensate in the other direction. I chose not too move the shift lever.

I found the Forma Terra very comfortable right off the bat, lots of support for the ankle and shin, they were extremely stiff though compared to touring boots.
A little time around the house before riding helped immensely. It took two to three rides to get used to them.
Hope to eventually shift to the Terra for all my rides.
 

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Thanks! I did walk around in them a bit and found them to be comfortable enough for that, but the stiffness of the shifting was enough that I didn't want to try it (especially seeing as this was my first ride in the mountains and I was going solo with my fiance following me with the truck and trailer).

Now that I'm a bit more used to the GSA, I'll have to try those out on my next ride.
 

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Discussion Starter #16
I use Rev'it Discovery Outdry. They are hybrids. Very comfortable, waterproof, protected, and the BOA closure tightens the boot with a turn of one knob, unfastens with one click. I hike a lot off bike and simply carry running shoes and tuck these in my cans when I am off bike. I've fitted myself into and prefer Crossfire 3 SRS but their soles are unusable on wet road surfaces, otherwise cannot be beat for comfort, protection, durability. Crossfire SRS 2's sole can be swapped for MX soles (via simple unscrew n rescrew) and then are usable on road but the 2s do not offer the same ankle limiter as the 3s.

The only time I want waterproofing is winter. So the crossfires would be fine in any 3 season application in Colorado. If all I were doing is offload, Crossfire 3 SRS would be the undoubted choice. (As Jet says however, very thin.)
I agree with you their on the soles that's why I like the TA's VS the SRS. The TAs are a sewn on soul that seems to be in my opinion the better choice with more traction and grooves on the bottom to help pick up the bike off the ground in case of a spill without loosing your footing on loose gravel or sand like I recently did just this past weekend.
 

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How long did it take for the boots to break-in?
I just put them on and walked around in them for half a Saturday. Then took them on a 2,300 mile trip to Key West and Back. Never felt any pressure points or discomfort. I was wearing them over 12 hours a day for almost 4 days. Made many stops to sight-see and walk around.
 

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How long did it take for the boots to break-in?
My wife and I both chose the Forma Adventure High. They were broken in by the end of the first day. Very comfortable. Absolutely happy with the decision. Good traction on dry and wet.
 

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Just picked up the Forma Adventure Low after reading thread upon thread, reviews, etc.

Wore them pretty much all day today. I wear a 43 EU in Nike, Merrill and other style shoes, and I consider my shoe size to be a 9 1/2. I took a chance and ordered a 43 in the Forma and it's a perfect fit. And, everyone was right, the fit right out of the box is comfortable! I ride a 2016 GSA and the shifting is not an issue. I did note that the aggressive sole sticks to the pegs quite nice, so don't forget that you can't just slide your foot off the pegs.

If they are this comfortable right out of the box, I can't wait until I break them in.
 

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A week or so ago I did a long riding day with my Forma boots on. As others said, they feel fairly broken in and are very comfortable to wear when walking. I do experience some fun when shifting - I've had to adjust my style a bit. With my other boots (can't remember the style), it's an easy reach over. With the Formas, I have to actively push my toe down to get under the shifter. Now that I'm a bit more used to it, it's not a big deal, but I will occasionally miss.

Still pleased with them. It'll just take more riding to make it second nature.
 
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