R1200GS Forum banner
1 - 20 of 23 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
2 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Looking at buying a used GS to replace my six month old triumph bobber black. The vibration from my bobber causes my hands to go numb (tried dampeners, position changes, etc).

I’m told the GS is a smooth (low vibration) motorcycle. 1) do you agree? 2) what advice would you give as I shop the dealer for a used 1200GS? 3) what year should I target or stay away from?

Can’t afford a new bike right now. The dealer carries BMW/ Triumph/ Ducati and seems motivated to help me find an alternative solution. The Triumph is my first bike. Main use is for commute to/from work (25mi). I live in Utah and like the idea of going down some dirt roads.

Thanks in advance for your insight!
 

·
Premium Member
2017 R1200 GSA Triple Black
Joined
·
45 Posts
It depends on what GS, you're looking at. If you're looking at an 1150/1200/1250, I would look to see if the bike was serviced properly. I've had an 1150 and two 1200s. They are very nice to ride. If you're looking at a GS/GSA, I'd look for a newer model that would have electronic cruise control. That can be a real benefit for commuting and/or long distance riding. I also live in the west, but I don't do hardcore GS stuff. Fire roads are about as off road as I want to do. Most of my riding is touring. If I had my choice between a GS or a GSA, I'd take the GSA.

Best of luck to you.
 

·
Registered
2017 White GSA
Joined
·
1,245 Posts
Welcome @willyjnix !
+1 with what @dba says.
Although, the GS/GSA can have some vibes too. Most can be cured with grip puppies, handlebar weights, and bar risers. I found the GS to be more vibey than the GSA. Drive them both if you can.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,180 Posts
My suggestion is if you want a Hexhead R1200GS buy it from me. I recently bought my 10th and am currently going through it. Within the next few days it'll be fully serviced and ready to ride around the world. I bought this particular bike as it had Ohlins on it that I wanted for another R1200GS that I am motard'ing. The rest of the bike is solid I just do not need three or seven of them around.
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
1,246 Posts
To me vibration all depends on the rpm. On my old 2007 GSA it's smooth up to 65 then gets a little buzzy at 75 mph. Not bad but noticeable, grip buddies mask most of it. I'd test ride on highway first.

Pluses and minuses of each model year range iteration. A lot depends on the options you want.

Checkout some of these threads:
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
155 Posts
My 1998 Harley 883 had vibrations that would make my fingers a bit numb on very long rides. Which is not good, it can ruin the circulation in your fingers in the long run, if it happens repeatedly. Padded gloves helped a lot to remedy. My next bike was a 650 VStrom. Still some vibrations but less so. The 2009 R1200GS I have now is even better. You can feel a little vibration but I can now wear thin gloves all day long without getting any numbness or tingling. No vibrations through the footpegs, even though I use all metal GSA pegs. If you are super sensitive then a three or four cylinder bike is likely better than the boxer.

Which GS? Depends how tall, strong and skilled you are, especially if you want to go offroad. The early R1200GS bikes are the lightest (505 lbs wet), having shaved a whopping 70 lbs off the R1150GS. But starting with the LC (2013-) or possibly already with the camhead (2010-2012) the weight started creeping back up. Although I would love the cruise control of the LC models, the only thing I wish my hexhead had.
I would not consider a GSA for off-roading but someone who is a foot taller and 100lbs heavier than me might be very happy taking the fat pig on a gnarly single trail. There is also the option to save weight by simply not filling the huge tank all the way.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2 Posts
Discussion Starter · #7 ·
To me vibration all depends on the rpm. On my old 2007 GSA it's smooth up to 65 then gets a little buzzy at 75 mph. Not bad but noticeable, grip buddies mask most of it. I'd test ride on highway first.

Pluses and minuses of each model year range iteration. A lot depends on the options you want.

Checkout some of these threads:
Thanks for suggesting the Grip Buddies. Before I make a final decision on swapping bikes, I’ll give Grip Buddies a try.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
40 Posts
I still have numb hands on GS, may be less so than on my old 4 cylinder Honda (2007 model) but what helps with GS is the cruise control! So try couple of bikes that do have it, I heard Kawasaki Ninja 1000 has a cruise control now and a very smooth engine, then try GS1200 (I suggest LC model, late 2016) or a 1250 if you can afford it.
Keep us posted how it goes. Good Luck!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
17 Posts
Looking at buying a used GS to replace my six month old triumph bobber black. The vibration from my bobber causes my hands to go numb (tried dampeners, position changes, etc).

I’m told the GS is a smooth (low vibration) motorcycle. 1) do you agree? 2) what advice would you give as I shop the dealer for a used 1200GS? 3) what year should I target or stay away from?

Can’t afford a new bike right now. The dealer carries BMW/ Triumph/ Ducati and seems motivated to help me find an alternative solution. The Triumph is my first bike. Main use is for commute to/from work (25mi). I live in Utah and like the idea of going down some dirt roads.

Thanks in advance for your insight!
You might go visit Harrison motorsports in Sandy Utah. I felt as though I got a very good buy on my 2017 GS/ with GSA equipment. But if you were actually new to riding my suggestion would be to start with a much smaller bike and work your way up to the larger one.
 

·
Registered
2011 R1200GS
Joined
·
18 Posts
I've been riding 50 plus years. I've had the numbness issue the past 25 years. My last bike 2011 Harley had cruise control, and was a real blessing for this issue. 2 weeks ago I got a 2011 R1200GS with no cruise. To get the bike home was a 3 hour deal. Ordered the grip puppies right away. Helped about 25-30 percent. The BMW is smooth but needs cruise or a throttle lock. Hope this helps!! John
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
16 Posts
I wouldnt buy a bike that many on here are saying "get this or get that to help these issues". Water cooled boxers are very smooth, Buy the latest model you can afford. That being said the latest can have tech issues, electronics,etc. I went from a r1150 rs that i loved and still do but 2018 r1200gs is awesome. Finally got all my electronics linked and that is very cool. Learning curve. Never thought i would be a GS guy but it is very easy to ride, balanced, quick responsive and very comfortable. Coming from servo brakes to these no issues at all.Good Luck
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
37 Posts
Looking at buying a used GS to replace my six month old triumph bobber black. The vibration from my bobber causes my hands to go numb (tried dampeners, position changes, etc).

I’m told the GS is a smooth (low vibration) motorcycle. 1) do you agree? 2) what advice would you give as I shop the dealer for a used 1200GS? 3) what year should I target or stay away from?

Can’t afford a new bike right now. The dealer carries BMW/ Triumph/ Ducati and seems motivated to help me find an alternative solution. The Triumph is my first bike. Main use is for commute to/from work (25mi). I live in Utah and like the idea of going down some dirt roads.

Thanks in advance for your insight!
I bought my '07 GS last Sept from my local BMW dealer. I'm the 3rd owner and it only had 7500 miles on it. It's a great runner and I don't have to worry about a bunch of electronic stuff crapping out. Even had Ohlins on it and a heated Corbin seat. Don't go earlier than '07. I use it for commuting and do not go off road. Great fun to ride, pretty smooth. I did an 800 mile weekend once and would do it again in a second!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,180 Posts
I bought my '07 GS last Sept from my local BMW dealer. I'm the 3rd owner and it only had 7500 miles on it. It's a great runner and I don't have to worry about a bunch of electronic stuff crapping out. Even had Ohlins on it and a heated Corbin seat. Don't go earlier than '07. I use it for commuting and do not go off road. Great fun to ride, pretty smooth. I did an 800 mile weekend once and would do it again in a second!
Why no earlier than 2007?
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
1,246 Posts
Buy the latest model you can afford.
To buy or repair?
😄

Buy new enough to get warranty or cheap enough where you can afford to fix it. Major BMW repairs ain't cheap.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,180 Posts
I wouldnt buy a bike that many on here are saying "get this or get that to help these issues". Water cooled boxers are very smooth, Buy the latest model you can afford. That being said the latest can have tech issues, electronics,etc. I went from a r1150 rs that i loved and still do but 2018 r1200gs is awesome. Finally got all my electronics linked and that is very cool. Learning curve. Never thought i would be a GS guy but it is very easy to ride, balanced, quick responsive and very comfortable. Coming from servo brakes to these no issues at all.Good Luck
So he's already bought a bike. Why are you trying to unring a bell with.

For me all the electronic BS and the extra 40 to 60lbs of the WC'ed have is a huge negative. So what, they added more power over the Hex/Camhead but the weight gains are not a good tradeoff IMHO.

I've ridden new 1250 GS's and when I got off I had no problem handing keys back to the dealer. The bike was nice in some ways but not in others. I do not need 38 ride modes, 14 electronic adjustable suspension settings, a TFT display liked with BT so i can start my espresso maker via voice coming when I start up the driveway. Nor do i want the 40 to 60lbs of extra heft the 1250's have. If I'm going to add 40 pounds I'd prefer it be in the form of an additional 6-1/2 gallons of fuel. I'd lover to have a 500+ range.

I'm glad folks have moved towards the WC bikes it killed the Hexhead market leaving lots of good bike on the secondary market for reasonable prices.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
16 Posts
Didn’t see he already bought a bike???? Op was advice on buying a used gs. Am I missing something? IDTS, either way it’s a choice for him or her. I see your point on the weight and the electronics, however the tft with the wonder wheel and all the connections are really nice. I really think it is nice on a longer tour.
 

·
Registered
R1200GSA 2011 - Yam SuperTenere 1200 2013 - Suzuki DRZ 400 2006
Joined
·
23 Posts
Hi guys
i have had a lot BMW GS/GSA since 1988 , 1100 - 1150 - 1200 SOHC - 1200 DOHC , over 400 000 miles on them.
I prefer the DOHC , after 2009 , start in 2010 and end in 2013 ( after it is the liquid cooled )
Much smoother , more power , really the best BMW built !!!
Chris
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,180 Posts
To avoid the servo braking system.
Again why? The servo brake system when operation is very good. If it does fail it is cheap and easy to bypass and you still have great brakes..

I'm not sure the failure rate is a rampant as the masses would lead you to believe. Out of the 11 R1200GS series bikes I've bought in the last 2-1/2 yeaars 6 have been servo assist. Keep in mind these braking systems are now 15 or 16 years old . Out of those 6 only one has a failed iABS and I knew then when I bought it. I tried to flush the system to try an revive it the brake fluid was the color of molasses. Actually the front circuit was operational and only the rear circuit was dead so technically only a 50% failure. It is my opinion that that bike may have never had the brakes flushed or at least not for a very long time. The other 5 iABS bikes all worked fine the the day I bought them to the day I sold them. Of course when I flushed the brakes on these bikes the fluid was much better looking so I assume they had at least received minimal care and that kept the iABS operational.

Now on to the post iABS 2007+ GS's I've had. Out of 5 of those the 2007 incidentally one of the lowest mileage GS I've bought (13,724 mile as when I bought it) and the ABS was and still is failed on it.

Back to the bike (2005 R1200GS) with the failed iABS. I knew there was a high potential that flushing the brakes would not fix them so that reflected upon the price paid for the bike. Since ABS is not a deal breaker for me if flushing the servo pump worked, great! If not I would simply bypassed the Servo unit. It ended up costing me $19 for a bubble flare tool $6 for a section of 3/16" brake line, $4 for a pint of brake fluid and an afternoon to do the bypass. When I was done I had factory non-ABS brakes. Keep in mind these bikes were also avalaible from the factory w/o ABS. ABS was optional.

Personally I would not shy away from a right priced 2004, 2005 or 2006 R1200GS. They are just as great a bike as the 2007+.
 
1 - 20 of 23 Posts
Top