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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I’m at a weird spot and looking for some advice.
My 2018 GSA is sitting at 5000 miles and it’s been a year since it was last serviced (oil change).
There is a scheduled service due @ 6000 miles.
I think it would take me 2-3 months to burn up that 1000 miles to get to 6000.
So change it now based on it being a year since las t service or wait until I hit the 6000 miles ??

TIA
Michael
 

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Have you ever tried to change the oil yourself? It's not just mileage, oil chemically degrades over time, and old engine oil can lead to premature wear. You could change the oil yourself and then wait for the 6000 mile service
 

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If this was the 1970’s and you were using Kendall or Quaker State conventional I’d say change it.

Today’s modern oil is far superior and lasts many times/miles longer. You can change the oil now and it won’t hurt or you can wait for another few thousand miles or years and it’ll be fine. Mileage and calendar do not determine if the oil needs changed. Only with an oil analysis can you determine the state of the oil and how much of the additive package remains. Manufacturers use a conservative service intervals as a CYA.

If oil degrades over time why is there not a best by date and on the bottle like a gallon of milk? Lots of internet lore and old wives tales that still linger on.
 

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I dunno, old oil can become acidic or hold moisture. The cost of a home oil change and filter is very low relative to the cost of an engine rebuild. It's easy and actually fun. I like to listen to audio books while I wrench on bikes. I do most of my own maintenance.
 

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If this was the 1970’s and you were using Kendall or Quaker State conventional I’d say change it.

Today’s modern oil is far superior and lasts many timer longer. You can change the oil now as it won’t hurt or you can wait for another few thousand miles or years and it’ll be fine. Mileage and calendar do not determine if the oil needs changed. Only an oil analysis can you determine the state of the oil and how much of the additive package remains. Manufacturers use a conservative service interval as a CYA.

If oil degrades over time why is there not a best by date and on the bottle like a gallon of milk? Lots of internet lore and old wives tales that still linger on.
VERY WELL PUT. AGREE 100%
 

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I dunno, old oil can become acidic or hold moisture. The cost of a home oil change and filter is very low relative to the cost of an engine rebuild. It's easy and actually fun. I like to listen to audio books while I wrench on bikes. I do most of my own maintenance.
How does old oil "hold moisture" but "new oil" does not? Are you saying oil becomes hygroscopic as it ages?? Water in with he oil is caused by the oil not getting up to at least 212 degrees. Water is a byproduct of combustion and temperature changes in the crank case no matter the age of the oil. Temperature is what causes water to collect or for it to gas off (boil) and be vented to the atmosphere.

As for the acids created from the combustion process that is what the "additives" packages is there for. It neutralizes these acids keeping the oil stable and not corrosive. Once the additives package is nearly consumed that is when the oil really needs to be changed.
 

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Is the bike on manufacture warranty? If something goes wrong the garage might tell you that you should have had a service at 12 months interval even if the mileage lower than 6k. If the bike not on warranty I would wait until you hit 6k, 2 months won't make a difference imo.
 

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I’m at a weird spot and looking for some advice.
My 2018 GSA is sitting at 5000 miles and it’s been a year since it was last serviced (oil change).
There is a scheduled service due @ 6000 miles.
I think it would take me 2-3 months to burn up that 1000 miles to get to 6000.
So change it now based on it being a year since las t service or wait until I hit the 6000 miles ??

TIA
Michael
The Rider’s Manual book specifies that the oil change and oil filter replacement be performed every 6000 miles or annually, whichever comes first.
Oil change.jpeg
 

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In doubt, change... oil and filter. I have never heard of a motor suffering from too much new oil.

If I'm planning a trip that will get me past the interval, I change oil before, I also change it as part of my winter storage routine.
 

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If this was the 1970’s and you were using Kendall or Quaker State conventional I’d say change it.

Today’s modern oil is far superior and lasts many times/miles longer. You can change the oil now and it won’t hurt or you can wait for another few thousand miles or years and it’ll be fine. Mileage and calendar do not determine if the oil needs changed. Only with an oil analysis can you determine the state of the oil and how much of the additive package remains. Manufacturers use a conservative service intervals as a CYA.

If oil degrades over time why is there not a best by date and on the bottle like a gallon of milk? Lots of internet lore and old wives tales that still linger on.
 

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Today's synthetic oils are awesome and their stability and durability are far superior. Take a look on this interesting video from Project Farm, about oil durability for cars, which also serves for 4 stroke motorcycles:
 
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