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Discussion Starter #1
New member-new to forum, new to BMW, new to R1200GS- so I'll just jump in. I recently picked up a 2006 R1200GS with 35K miles. Fresh from many years in the FJR community. Relocation to New Mexico made me rethink my choice of bikes so here I am. The "fun" of buying someone elses bike is reviewing, and finally undoing much of what previous owner/s have done. This is my first undo...
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I'm sure no one at BMW designed this windshield attachment...not sure what they were thinking. I picked up a windshield with the frame and adjusters on ebay. Figured even though I don't need another windshield doesn't hurt to have another bullet it you need it:

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Came complete with a full set of adjusters so all was good...maybe. Previous owner gave me a coffee can full of misc "spares" he received from his previous owner. Things like the center stand return spring, original footpegs, a hundred bolts and these:

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They look like brand new adjusters. They're new alright but they don't work. Initially I thought it was a left/right thing but no, they appear to clocked about 90 degrees out from the used set I got. Not sure it they are the cheap Chinese replacements on ebay or maybe for a different bike. They just wouldn't clock properly with the windshield I have. So I pieced together two adjusters using new and used pieces and I think Hank done it this way:

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I've only managed about a hundred miles so far, combination of weather, social distancing and so on. Very different ride from the FJR, certainly in power, but oddly to me the bike seems much easier to throw around into corners. It's got 50/50 rubber on it so I'm being pretty cautious about exploring limits but so far it is an absolute blast to ride. Can't wait to get it on some unimproved road surfaces to see what that's like. The one off-pavement excursion on the FJR was only a couple hundred yards and it was pretty frightening. I'm sure I will have many questions about adding aux power, lighting and who knows what....
 

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Iffin' it were me the next things I do especially the 3rd item

-change the engine oil and filter
-change the transmission and rear drive oil
-flush the servo brakes and bleed the brakes
-check the air filter
-pull the swingarm and clean check and lube the splines and u-joints
-check, clean repack or replace the swingarm pivot bearing
-inspect and replace if needed the rubber boots on e swing arm

I recently bought a 3rd R1200GS a 2005 and did the above and more.

Here's a bit of auxiliary wiring I removed

Wiring Junk.jpg
 

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'14 R1200 GS Adv "Freya"
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I went from a "13 FJR with 60,000 miles from new to a '14 GS Adv.

I agree with your comment
Very different ride from the FJR, certainly in power, but oddly to me the bike seems much easier to throw around into corners. It's got 50/50 rubber on it so I'm being pretty cautious about exploring limits but so far it is an absolute blast to ride
I've got 50/50 rubber on mine and after a while, you'll get comfortable pushing those tires on the pavement. I put 27,000 miles on mine last year, absolutely love it. Best bike so far for me.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
All things that were "supposed" to have been done recently. He did have the swingarm boots replaced at both ends so I know the splines were serviced. Fortunately he used the local dealer for the work so I will have all the work orders pulled to verify.


Iffin' it were me the next things I do especially the 3rd item

-change the engine oil and filter
-change the transmission and rear drive oil
-flush the servo brakes and bleed the brakes
-check the air filter
-pull the swingarm and clean check and lube the splines and u-joints
-check, clean repack or replace the swingarm pivot bearing
-inspect and replace if needed the rubber boots on e swing arm

I recently bought a 3rd R1200GS a 2005 and did the above and more.

Here's a bit of auxiliary wiring I removed

View attachment 26698
 

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If its a BMW dealership they may not lube the splines as BMW does not call for this to be done. While not paramount that the splines be lubricated it is good medicine to do so. It keeps corrosion at bay lessening the destructive effect of continual rusting and wearing away. That is how splines wear. Surface rust develops then the metal to metal contact grind the rust away. Then new rust develops and the process is repeated over and over until significant metal is worn away.

As for the brakes if you are not familiar with the servo systems they were short lived tech from BMW that had some issues. The best thing you can do is learn to service them yourself (if your handy with a wrench) as they should be done every 10,000 miles or once a year. The 1st time it'll take an hour or so but after yo learn how to remove the side panels and gas tank its a 45 minute job beginning to end.

Here is a complete guide to flushing servo brakes. You will need a special funnel. You can either make one or buy one from Beemer Bone Yard, a 7mm wrench heated and bent on a 90 is helpful but not totally necessary and section of poly tubing to fit over the bleed nipples. The whole flush and brake bleed can be done with 1 pint of DOT4 but 1st time get 2 pints as you will probably flush more than necessary (and that's okay).

 

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Discussion Starter #6
Spline maintenance was a regular thing on my FJR so I'm not unfamiliar with that job though it does look to have a few more steps on the GS...the servo brake thing is new and I appreciate the link to the process. I've read a little about their sometimes "problematic" nature but so far they seem to be working fine.👍
 

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Again to keep them working fine regular maintenance is paramount. If the servo unit goes tits up it around $3,000 from BMW. People will tell you that it can be rebuilt for $300 but they are mistaken. The ABS can be rebuilt for around $300 the servo's are a different story.

If the servo unit does go out you have a couple choices.

1. Bite the bullet and but a new unit
2. Source a good used unit (these do not pop up a lot)
3. Bypass the servo/ABS unit with a couple new braided stainless steel brake lines and go back to traditional brakes. The brakes will work as well and other bikes with non-power assist but you will lose the ABS function.

I have 2 GS's with servo brakes and they are a thing of beauty. Nothgin I mean nothgin stops better when they are operational. If and when I experience a failure I'll opt for #3 a losing ABS is not a deal breaker for me.

Here's a good guide to swingarm removal.

 

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Discussion Starter #8
If its a BMW dealership they may not lube the splines as BMW does not call for this to be done. While not paramount that the splines be lubricated it is good medicine to do so. It keeps corrosion at bay lessening the destructive effect of continual rusting and wearing away. That is how splines wear. Surface rust develops then the metal to metal contact grind the rust away. Then new rust develops and the process is repeated over and over until significant metal is worn away.

As for the brakes if you are not familiar with the servo systems they were short lived tech from BMW that had some issues. The best thing you can do is learn to service them yourself (if your handy with a wrench) as they should be done every 10,000 miles or once a year. The 1st time it'll take an hour or so but after yo learn how to remove the side panels and gas tank its a 45 minute job beginning to end.

Here is a complete guide to flushing servo brakes. You will need a special funnel. You can either make one or buy one from Beemer Bone Yard, a 7mm wrench heated and bent on a 90 is helpful but not totally necessary and section of poly tubing to fit over the bleed nipples. The whole flush and brake bleed can be done with 1 pint of DOT4 but 1st time get 2 pints as you will probably flush more than necessary (and that's okay).

I spent some time reviewing the bleeding instructions, fiddley but doesn't look too challenging. I do wonder what the deal is with the aluminum spacers. I guess they insure that the pistons are fully retracted insuring that all the old fluid is flushed out but it seems a little unnecessary. All the bleeding I've done in the past was done with the pads in place and I never saw any issues. Have you done this the spacers or with the pads in place?
 

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Yes the spacers are to make sure the pucks are pushed back into the caliper as far as possible to keep from trapping fluid behind the puck.

I do not use the spacers just make sure the brakes pads are newer. If the brake pad were worn beyond 1/2 way I'd cut some shims out of 1/4 plywood or plastic sheeting. Haven't had to cross that bridge yet.
 
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