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Discussion Starter #1
Greetings all
Based in New Zealand, my mate and i are planning the big one: Prudhoe Bay in Alaska to Ushuaia in Tierra del Fuego beginning in June. We plan to ship our own bikes from NZ to Vancouver and head off from there.

One of the things we are discussing is how to reduce the chance of punctures and how best to repair them when we get them. We are both running TKC80s on the front, he has a Tourance on the rear and I have an Anakee. All tyres are in new condition and we will replace them before they get too worn as we travel.

I am carrying a plug set and an electric pump. We are debating
  • taking tubes
  • aerosol foam kits
  • bead breakers
  • tyre levers
I would be interested in what others on the forum might recommend.
Cheerz
Kennif
 

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The only plug I use is a real vulcanizing motorcycle tire plug. I got mine from SoundRider.com. Store bought plugs will eventually fail due to the fact they are not true vulcanizing in nature.

Good luck!
 

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Product called Rideon, sold by my local BMW dealer, have had it in my last two sets of tires. Many police agencies use it in their bikes with good success, flat tires are a pain
Good electric pump, manual pump, tire repair kits and a tube for sidewalk damage should get you their
Consider pre planning tire changes and have some positioned enroute, hate to need new tires and none be aviable
 

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'09 R1200GS + '81 R80 G/S
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Worm plug tire repairs are strictly a temporary repair until you can get to a tire shop to fix permanently with a mushroom plug from the inside. Tubes for sidewall damage is good,, providing that there are no intruding sharps.
 

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R1200gs
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For an emergency repair that realy works.

Micro Kit + Cargol inflated
(Car, Motorcycle and Scooter)

This light, compact kit fits neatly in the included storage bag (approx. 4” x 9”). Includes chalk to mark the puncture, pliers to remove the object, CO2 adaptor valve, CO2 cartridges, spare valve caps, Cargols to repair the puncture with a simple twist of the wrist in under two minutes.
Ref K004 K004

I even carrie on in the car now.
 

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Ride on

And if the ride-on does not fix the puncture, it will prevent a worm plug from sealing and then what??
The best solution for fixing a flat on the road without removing the tire is a vulcanizing plug, period.
 

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I recently saw a demo of how to fix a puncture in a tubeless tire using one of those sticky strings. The instructor had run over a screw intentionally -- for the demo. He happens to use Ride-On so, when he removed the screw, the Ride-On immediately filled the hole. You could easily see it happen.

He noted that but then used a raasp to auger the hole and then insert the sticky string. Worked fine.

I don't see that using Ride-On in any way prevents also repairing with more tradtional methods if you want to do so. It's just that you may not need to.
 

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Ride-On

I must admit that I am not familiar with Ride-On, however, Slime will definitely prevent the sticky plug from bonding with the rubber and will cause air to leak. In some instances, the plug shoots out altogether.
 

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Good point regarding Slime. I didn't know that. I will check with the instructor to see if Ride-On has the same problem and post back. I hope it does not but -- if it does, then I certainly agree with you.
 

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Speaking of Ride-On, I’ve always used it on my non-TPMS bikes, but so far haven’t gotten a good answer about its compatibility with TPMS on my GSA. My local dealer likes it, but said they won’t recommend it due to liability if it ruins the sensors. I’d like to use it when I mount my next set of tires, but am just unsure. Maybe like most things, it works for some and they’ll swear by it, while others not.
 

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You need a tire pump. The co2 just isn't enough. Normally I use the Safety Seal repair kit but I recently bought a Nealey repair kit that I think might work just as good or better. A tube is a good idea and if you carry one you won't need it. :) You can use the side stand to break the bead. I'll attach a video if you haven't seen it yet. I'm also going to be up there in June so I may see you.
 

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I had my first flat 53 years ago. Since it was on my brother’s CB450 and he did not know I had “borrowed” his bike, I rode it a few miles on the flat and parked it. The second flat was 4 years ago. I plugged and rode on.

I do not concern myself too much with the prospect of a flat.
 

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The problem isn't a nail up in Alaska it's a sharp rock cutting the tire and only a new tire or tube will keep you going.. It's 200-250 miles between fuel stops on the Dalton Highway (1000 miles of dirt round trip)
That being said most don't have a problem even with street tires. I plan on running Dunlop Trailsmart tires up and putting new Dunlop Mission tires on in Fairbanks before heading north as mine should be about shot just getting there. My buddy is going to try to do the entire trip with one set of Motoz trackionator GPS tires on his GSA. Those tires have a very good reputation doing just that. He is going to carry a tube but I'm just carting a repair kit.
 

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I lived in Fairbanks for many years and have been on the Dalton several times. Saw one tire that took seven string plugs to get it to hold air long enough to get from near Coldfoot to Fairbanks. Carrying a few big patches and a spare tube, even for tubeless tires, is a good idea.
 

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I've had trouble with the various mushroom type plugs and now only carry Safety Seal ropes and kit. I just recently plugged a tire on my F-150 with that kit and it worked like a charm.

One thing is just about certain, if you don't carry a kit, you'll get a flat; and, if you are equipped for flats, you'll never have one.

I would never shoot fix-a-flat into a tubeless tire except in the most dire emergency. That crap is horrible to clean up and just imagine what it'll do to your TPMS sensor.
 

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I have bought, but not yet installed, Ride-on. I am advised that it is water soluble and no problem to get out of a wheel. Also, the BMW tire pressure sensors are waterproof and should not be bothered by the ride-on, unlike some of the older Honda TPMS.
 

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I have bought, but not yet installed, Ride-on. I am advised that it is water soluble and no problem to get out of a wheel. Also, the BMW tire pressure sensors are waterproof and should not be bothered by the ride-on, unlike some of the older Honda TPMS.
TPMS is airtight why wouldn't it be watertight.:grin2:
 
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