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The problem isn't a nail up in Alaska it's a sharp rock cutting the tire and only a new tire or tube will keep you going.. It's 200-250 miles between fuel stops on the Dalton Highway (1000 miles of dirt round trip)
That being said most don't have a problem even with street tires. I plan on running Dunlop Trailsmart tires up and putting new Dunlop Mission tires on in Fairbanks before heading north as mine should be about shot just getting there. My buddy is going to try to do the entire trip with one set of Motoz trackionator GPS tires on his GSA. Those tires have a very good reputation doing just that. He is going to carry a tube but I'm just carting a repair kit.
Did the Dalton two summers ago on new Heidenau K60 Scouts. From Az. to the arctic crcle and back was 8K miles. I hit the Dalton at about 3800 miles on the K60's and there was plenty of tread for that road to get me up from Fairbanks to Prudhoe bay and back.

One of the guys I rode with had street tires and less than 35% left on his tires, and he made it without issues also. He needed a new rear somewhere back in Montana so his rear has perhaps 2K left on it when on the Dalton.
 

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I have bought, but not yet installed, Ride-on. I am advised that it is water soluble and no problem to get out of a wheel. Also, the BMW tire pressure sensors are waterproof and should not be bothered by the ride-on, unlike some of the older Honda TPMS.
Where did you get that info? This is what I got from BMW as I like to use RideOn too, but not in this bike:



The sensors are not sealed. A contamination of the internal diaphragm can cause an improper read. Below is a picture of the opening that MUST stay clear on the TMP sensors. (That includes tire lubes and paste)
 

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Several years ago, I saw a trucker patching a big-rig tire at a truck stop in Texas. I walked over to see if there was anything I could do for him but he knew what he was doing. I watched him for a couple of minutes and he showed me a Neeley tire repair plug kit. There was no glue, no muss or fuss. He said he'd used them in the past and they made motorcycle kits. I looked them up, https://www.nealeytirerepairkit.com/ and ordered a couple of kits. I've used the kit on two of my tires and they flat out work.

Mike
 

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Several years ago, I saw a trucker patching a big-rig tire at a truck stop in Texas. I walked over to see if there was anything I could do for him but he knew what he was doing. I watched him for a couple of minutes and he showed me a Neeley tire repair plug kit. There was no glue, no muss or fuss. He said he'd used them in the past and they made motorcycle kits. I looked them up, https://www.nealeytirerepairkit.com/ and ordered a couple of kits. I've used the kit on two of my tires and they flat out work.

Mike
After half a million miles and many flats I found Nealey works best!
 

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Black Beast

I have a 2009 R1200 GSA. Riding with others and myself when tire/tube problems happen. I have a tube for my bike that fits the front wheel (heavy duty) and will still work in the rear waded up if needed to limp to help if tubeless tire is beyond repair. Small bottle of baby powder for ease of installation of tube so you don't pinch as easily. (also used for medical needs). An old school Camel patch kit if you do pinch tube. I also have two plug kits of decent quality. One for small holes and one for large holes. Also an electric pump that plugs into my SAE battery tender outlet. (with added short hose I use for airing up mattress pads). I have two thin plastic rim shields. Three tires irons approximately 12". One spoon, one flat, one curved for better leverage. Also a four way valve stem repair tool. One extra valve stem, core and valve cap. A pen air gauge tested against others to insure accurate/consistent air pressures. Also which model years not sure but you can use the center stand foot lift pad/arm to help breakdown the tire bead with weight and leverage of the bike. Also various universal straps to hold center stand in position when doing so. You can see procedure on you tube videos as well. Hopefully prepared for all troubles. Oh and tow truck insurance from paved roads.
 
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