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Discussion Starter #1
I find the Hayes front brakes on my R1250GS vastly superior to the Brembo set up I had on my previous R1200GS‘. Very little pressure on the lever produces strong, powerful progressive braking which inspires total confidence in every situation. I had many reliability issues with previous Brembos including the brake lever almost touching the handlebars, which my dealer took a long time to sort out, and a couple of rear master cylinder replacements because I of total rear brake failures. Sadly, although I have Hayes brakes at the front I still have inferior Brembos on the back.

I regard Brembo brakes as being overrated. Expensive and are frequently subject to recalls due to bad design or poor manufacturing. No surprise really. They are Italian. Made in the country that supplied me with the most unreliable motorcycle I have every owned, namely the 2010 Ducrapi Multistresser 1200.

I rest my case.
 

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Joking apart, the Italians certainly have a rather peculiar idea of quality control. I have owned variious Moto Guzzis over the years and the built in 'Italian character' is always evident. God forbid if you want spares in August, the whole country shuts down for the entire month.
I could never bring myself to owning a Ducati the maintainence bills alone make the eyes water and without a full service history by a recognised Ducati guru pretty much worthless second hand.
 

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It's interesting that you bring this up now as I just returned from a 2500 mile trip where my brake level got progressively spongier. If I pulled it hard enough I'd get fine braking action but the range on the level between the beginning of braking action and getting full action was large. I've got it on my things to do list to go inspect everything and bleed them myself and see if that takes care of the problem.

I got off my GS and hopped onto my KTM Super Duke and just about went over the handlebars :). Those Brembo M50 monoblocks are amazing brakes.
 

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It's interesting that you bring this up now as I just returned from a 2500 mile trip where my brake level got progressively spongier. If I pulled it hard enough I'd get fine braking action but the range on the level between the beginning of braking action and getting full action was large. I've got it on my things to do list to go inspect everything and bleed them myself and see if that takes care of the problem.

I got off my GS and hopped onto my KTM Super Duke and just about went over the handlebars :). Those Brembo M50 monoblocks are amazing brakes.
Stick in some EBC HH pads too.
 

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Discussion Starter #10
As a bonus, Hayes brake pads are cheaper than Brembo. I guess the old adage that you have to pay for the name is true.
 

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I find the Hayes front brakes on my R1250GS vastly superior to the Brembo set up I had on my previous R1200GS‘. Very little pressure on the lever produces strong, powerful progressive braking which inspires total confidence in every situation. I had many reliability issues with previous Brembos including the brake lever almost touching the handlebars, which my dealer took a long time to sort out, and a couple of rear master cylinder replacements because I of total rear brake failures. Sadly, although I have Hayes brakes at the front I still have inferior Brembos on the back.

I regard Brembo brakes as being overrated. Expensive and are frequently subject to recalls due to bad design or poor manufacturing. No surprise really. They are Italian. Made in the country that supplied me with the most unreliable motorcycle I have every owned, namely the 2010 Ducrapi Multistresser 1200.

I rest my case.
People are complaining about the Hayes units leaking. (You might want to keep an eye on yours) BMW has a recall on it. As far as the back brake, I believe the caliper is Brembo but the problem lies with the Nissin master cylinder. People on the Adventure forum are replacing it with a Brembo. bmw r1200gs lc rear brake failures
 

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All else being equal - pads, rotors, brake fluid and steel brake lines - I don't find much difference in actual stopping power between Hayes, the premium Japanese brands, and Brembo.

However, where Brembo's outshine the rest for me is in their feel.

Every other brake manufacture's stopping power seems to be a function of lever (or pedal) TRAVEL. Whereas with Bembo's the stopping power is controlled by lever PRESSURE.

The Bembo's I have on 4 MX/XC bikes and 3 road bikes have only about 1/2" to 1" of free travel before the pads start to bite. At that point, the difference between light braking and full lockup occurs within approximately the next 1/8" of travel.

While it may sound counter intuitive in theory, in actual practice it's more precise, more consistent, and less fatiguing - particularly off-road.

Whether riding street or off-road, I always have one or two fingers hovering the front lever. With Brembo's I can run the lever up to 2" closer to the throttle which allows me to get my knuckles (as opposed to fingertips) over the lever. In terms of bike control, that's beneficial on the street and a game-changer off-road.

Even the Brembo's on my car work similarly. Took me a couple hundred mile to adjust to them but now it's pure braking Nirvana. Love Brembo's.
 

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Hayes motorcycle brakes must be good! If they can stop a bicycle they must be even better at stopping a motorcycle?

Ah yes stopping a 25lb bicycle going 30 mph is exactly the same as stopping/slowing a 500 lb + motorcycle going 2 or 3 times as fast and doing this in rapid succession if riding really twisty roads.
 
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