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Discussion Starter #1
I just acquired my gs 2006 2 days ago . it has 44k miles and i just had a peak at the rear ujoints of the drive shaft by sliding back the rubber protection . I noticed there is a bit of rust on it . now i don't know how bad it is , but i am thinking to take the shaft out , clean it and cover it with a coat of rust resistant paint , then grease it and put it back in .
Would that be ok do? Will it protect my shaft from further corrosion?
Thanks
 

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Rust in and of itself may not necessarily be a problem - surface rust isn't always an issue.
Having said that, I subscribe to the theory that every time the back wheel comes off, clean and lube the final drive (shaft) splines. I haven't done this on my GS yet, but was very easy to do on my K series. Used to take me about 45 mins from go to whoa.
Wait til you get some more responses here, because I might be barking up the wrong tree, but I would suggest having a look at Chris Harris
Instructional videos on YouTube.
Cheers
Greg
 

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I'd go with PoppyGreg suggestion! A light surface rust wouldn't worry me, as I would clean it, check to make sure no damage is done to the splines and grease it again with the recommended lubricant. I wouldn't worry about painting it, the grease should do the job of protecting it!
But One thing I would try to find out, is why did it get some surface rust!! Is the boot sitting in its place properly and secure! Is it old and drying up, with cracks in it! Are the plastic ring that help keep the rubber boot in place at both ends,broken or worn out? When you slid the rubber boot back in place, did you feel the boot snap in place?
The small clips on the rings worn off on the rear boot rings of my bike and the boot kept opening up. I replaced the boot as the rings came with it!

Art.
 

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A little surface rust is not a concern.
However, at that age it should have new shaft boots anyway. They crack and you can't always see it. Mine (2006) were cracked, and I went through 6 or 7 deep water crossings. The swingarm filled with water and stayed full for a long time (there was a high-water mark inside up near the transmission).
The lower splines were rusted to the final drive - solid. It took 4 days with penetrant, wood blocks and the gentle use of a hammer to finally get it free.
I cleaned up the whole shaft, it was completely rusted. The U-joints were fine. I rubbed some motor oil on the shaft to help keep it from rusting again, and thoroughly cleaned the splines to get the thing looking new. I replaced the boots and put it all back together, and have had no problems since. And I ride that bike hard.
Inspect your boots for cracks, and if there's any question about it, replace them (or stay out of the water until you do).
I used Honda Moly 60 (I think?) to grease the splines. I had it open a while ago before a long dirt trip, and it looked and felt great.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Thank for all your input.
I think i would need to change my rubber boots , as they slide back fairly easy and there's no pop or click when i push them back in place . when new boits arive i will clean the shaft too and new coat of lubricant. Although i am still thinking of that rust proof paint ..for a long term peace of mind
 

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If the boots slide open easily, then the inner retaining ring isn't seated. The upper boot has a zip-tie holding it to the transmission side, and a plastic inner retaining ring inside the other end. It snaps into place, but you have to know where to apply pressure to it without unseating it from the boot. Once you have it open, you'll see what I mean.
The lower boot has retainers on both sides.
It took me a few tries to get them all seated properly the first time. But now that I know how it all fits together, it's pretty easy.
 

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A little surface rust is not a concern.
However, at that age it should have new shaft boots anyway. They crack and you can't always see it. Mine (2006) were cracked, and I went through 6 or 7 deep water crossings. The swingarm filled with water and stayed full for a long time (there was a high-water mark inside up near the transmission).
The lower splines were rusted to the final drive - solid. It took 4 days with penetrant, wood blocks and the gentle use of a hammer to finally get it free.
I cleaned up the whole shaft, it was completely rusted. The U-joints were fine. I rubbed some motor oil on the shaft to help keep it from rusting again, and thoroughly cleaned the splines to get the thing looking new. I replaced the boots and put it all back together, and have had no problems since. And I ride that bike hard.
Inspect your boots for cracks, and if there's any question about it, replace them (or stay out of the water until you do).
I used Honda Moly 60 (I think?) to grease the splines. I had it open a while ago before a long dirt trip, and it looked and felt great.
Robday,
Can you explain how you managed to split the final drive from the splines please?
I've tried to remove my final drive but it won't move. Shaft and U joint looks fine (black painted) but can see some rust on the Ujoint to FD splines. Soaked in penetrant for one day but still won't move. How did you use the hammer/block of wood?
I know this is sometime since you wrote this article & I hope you can give your tips.

Cheers
Rotkopf
 

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Rotkopf, Robdays hasn't been here for a few years so I'll offer some input.

Having taken my driveshaft/ swingarm out to replace boots, I'd recommend the following.

Remove driveshaft at the transmission side. (Removing swingarm is optional but likely will make the job easier and gives a change to lubricate swingarm bearings which you should do anyway.)

Once removed you can prop the final drive and driveshaft upright to get penetrating fluid into the splines easier. Then, tap lightly to remove (too much force could damage seals/ final drive). If I recall right you can't really get access to pry it off as end of shaft is deep in final drive housing.

Here is best video I have found on swingarm removal:
 

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Rotkopf, Robdays hasn't been here for a few years so I'll offer some input.

Having taken my driveshaft/ swingarm out to replace boots, I'd recommend the following.

Remove driveshaft at the transmission side. (Removing swingarm is optional but likely will make the job easier and gives a change to lubricate swingarm bearings which you should do anyway.)

Once removed you can prop the final drive and driveshaft upright to get penetrating fluid into the splines easier. Then, tap lightly to remove (too much force could damage seals/ final drive). If I recall right you can't really get access to pry it off as end of shaft is deep in final drive housing.

Here is best video I have found on swingarm removal:
Hi Krons,

Thanks for that, I'll follow it up. Good idea about swingarm bearings greasing too.
Cheers
Rotkopf
 
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