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I ordered in a set of these for my 1200GS over a month ago and was told they'd be in by Jan 17th. The rear came in but not the front. Still waiting.
 

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Can any riders give any reviews. I'm liking all the videos I'm seeing on these tires, but no one is really addressing their quietness or lack thereof.

 

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Discussion Starter #25
I do not notice any noise from the tires. I do wear earplugs however. The grip on the street is quite good. I can push street tires pretty good but I was a bit hesitant with these because Dunlop says they are a 50/50 tire. They are a bias ply tire tire and the rubber on the back is 1/2 inch thick so it took me a bit to get used to them. They never once broke free on me. I am not a seasoned dirt guy but the dirt roads I was on they felt great. I indend to take these tires to Alaska in late May so will find out how long they last. Overall I'm very pleased with them.
 

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I ordered mine through Bob's BMW who price matched them for me. My bike's due for it's big biannual service so I'll have them mount up the tires while it's in there.
 

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I got a pair mounted on my 16 GS last week.
Only done about 200mi on them but noticed a significant difference in steering behavior on the front.
I don’t have much experience with changing tire types. I had the factory original Michelin Anakees on before.

There is noticeable resistance to turning and taking curves. I have to push the bars a lot more and it feels like the the bars are pushing back against me. It is a bit weird to me.

What do you all think? Is this normal due to the big tire design change from a street tire to a 50/50?


Sent from my iPad using Tapatalk Pro
 

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Discussion Starter #29
Yep. That is what I'm feeling as well. I think it's normal. Make sure the tire pressure is correct.
 

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Yep. That is what I'm feeling as well. I think it's normal. Make sure the tire pressure is correct.
Thanks Rick. I noticed it right out of the parking lot of the place that mounted them. Checking pressure is a good idea. I am going to do that now.
 

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If you look at the graphic supplied by Dunlop about their range of tires, it begs the question about what the criteria is that makes it more street and/or dirt oriented?



I've had D606 tires on my KLR on a twisty road scraping the pegs. Certainly without the margin of if, say, I'd been running a dual compound street tire but for all but the most demanding street application, the grip is there. Sure I'd probably push a Dunlop Roadsmart tire a bit harder with a little more margin but is that extra bit of traction really enough to color in that many more "street" blocks on that chart.

They made a lot of the long tire life of the Traiimax Mission tire and that makes a lot of sense for considering it more street capable. Riders on ADV bikes want to know if the tire they put on the bike for the trip to Alaska is going to finish the trip AND give good grip when off down gravel and muddy roads.

So my conclusion from running 50:50 tires for a lot of street miles is that they perform really well on the street for almost all types of riding but for two things: noise and vibration. So if I'm looking for a more street oriented tire on my ADV bikes, that's going to be a big consideration. Otherwise, I'd just throw on another set of Michelin Wilds and call it good. They last a long time, give great performance on and off the road; but, they're noisy and cause a lot of vibration.

Hence my problem with the Dunlop marketing on this Trailmax Mission tire - they don't say anything about the comparative noise and vibration of these tires vs. the competitors. If these tires are noisy, I think they have to take away some number of the street boxes they colored in on the chart. Maybe that's what they did vs. the Roadsmart? I guess we'll have to wait until some early adopter on here decides to try them and give us some feedback. If I can wait long enough for the tires to be available, that might be me.
I recently removed a Motoz GPS front with 5000 kms. It had split across the full tread width at the layup of the tyre carcass. This is the second front tyre out of 3 that has had this issue. This is a great tyre on sealed roads and OK on unsealed but on sealed roads it is noisy, even with ear plugs. I acclimatise somewhat to the tyre noise but i still don't like it. Cranking up the music volume helps.

The GPS was replaced with a Pirelli Scorpion Trail 2. The Trail 2 is about half as noisy as the GPS. I have used a Trail 2 before on a 1200GS and hearing the new Trail 2 reminded me of how noisy it was back then. Also the Bridgestone A41 the bike came from new was noisy.

I am of the opinion that any front tyre on a 1200/1250 is noisy to the rider as any tyre noise funnels up the fork then through the gap between tank & instrument cluster. It's simply about how noisy it is.

I will be pleasantly surprised if the front Trailmax Mission with its extremely busy tread pattern is quiet. I predict it will be noisier than the Trail 2. For me at least.

The Trailmax Mission is not available to me till mid 2020.
 

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Finally got my Trailmax Mission tires on my 1200GS today. I rode a set of Michelin Wilds in to the dealer and the Dunlops home about 30 miles. The Wilds are loud enough to annoy drivers around me at highway speeds. Deafening without ear plugs. But they last a long time in all kinds of use and work really well both on the road and in the gnarly stuff.

Now, the Dunlops on my ride home made no discernible noise and no vibration. If these tires perform slightly better on the street and come anywhere near approaching the grip of the Wilds off in the woods then this tire will be a game changer. I'll know a lot more next week when I ride sections 2 & 3 of the Mid Atlantic BDR on them. I'm doing a day ride north on those sections and then the next day riding all the best twisty roads in WVa going back south. After those two days I should have a really good report on how these tires compare with the other tires I've used: TKC80, Michelin Wild, and Michelin Anakee III.
 

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2020 R1250GSA
I just got back from an off road motorcycle course here in Virginia. With brand new Trailmax Mission tires on the GSA I saw pavement, dirt, gravel, wet grass and mud. I started off with stock air pressure but quickly realized I had to air down. With tires pressure around 22 psi front and rear the tires really changed. On pavement they were wonderful. They were quiet and gripped very well in some very aggressive twisties. Same thing with dirt and gravel. They hooked up very well. I didn't have any issues with the tires breaking loose unless I whacked the throttle. On wet grass (as expected) things changed. I could stop riding up a hill then start again with very little slipping but going down was a different story. If the back tire broke loose it tended to slide more than I wanted it to. In regards to mud ..... the back tire seemed to handle it "ok" but the front wanted to wander more than I wanted it to. So ..... at around $370 a set the final decision will be based on milage. If these things get 6-7 even 8K miles it could be a game changer for me. IMHO opinion however ..... I think a better combination will be a Trailmax Mission rear and a TKC80 front. In addition I would rate the set more of a 60/40 road to off road tire.
 

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I started off with stock air pressure but quickly realized I had to air down. With tires pressure around 22 psi front and rear the tires really changed. On pavement they were wonderful.
Do you mean you always run at 22psi even if you're only on pavement? Don't they overheat?
 

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it could be a game changer for me. IMHO opinion however ..... I think a better combination will be a Trailmax Mission rear and a TKC80 front.
What makes it a gamechanger if you need a TKC80 front? Wouldn't you then lose the road capability?
 

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Do you mean you always run at 22psi even if you're only on pavement? Don't they overheat?
I did not and do not air down the tires for pavement, only for the off road riding. Sorry.
 

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What makes it a gamechanger if you need a TKC80 front? Wouldn't you then lose the road capability?
TKC80's on the front typically last 7-8K miles on my GS. If the rear Trailmax Mission tire gets the same milage that would make it a game changer for me. I have pushed the TKC80's hard on pavement (wet and dry) and they never let me down. So if the Trailmax Mission gets anywhere near 7-8K miles the best combination for me would be the TKC80 front and Trailmax Mission rear tire.
 

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TKC80's on the front typically last 7-8K miles on my GS. If the rear Trailmax Mission tire gets the same milage that would make it a game changer for me. I have pushed the TKC80's hard on pavement (wet and dry) and they never let me down. So if the Trailmax Mission gets anywhere near 7-8K miles the best combination for me would be the TKC80 front and Trailmax Mission rear tire.
Makes sense. I too like the idea of fronts and rears getting the same mileage. Hoping I get that with my new E-07+'s.
 

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Makes sense. I too like the idea of fronts and rears getting the same mileage. Hoping I get that with my new E-07+'s.
The E-07's are very similar to the Trailmax Mission in performance. I really liked the original E-07 but do not care for the E-07+. Without the small center strip it just didn't last as long.
 
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