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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi all,

Before the summer hits, I want to do some maintenance to my 2016's 1200GS LC. I have more or less everything set up, except for the end drive grease. I want to inspect and grease it. I bought the bike used and I don't know if any maintenance has been done there.

The problem I have is that I can't seem to find the correct grease and I don't know enough about the topic to do an educated guess about a substitute. As far as I know, the recommended grease for the end drive is the Castrol Molub-Alloy TA, which is not available on Amazon Germany nor is available on some known German retailers such as Louis or Polo. I also searched other on-line stores to no avail.

Now, does somebody know any worthy substitute for this Castrol grease? Anything a bit more available to the general public? Maybe a German member?

Any help is appreciated!
 

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Try this one:



Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
 

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Thanks! Unfortunately, it's not available on the German market either. I haven't been able to find the equivalent by looking at the product packaging...
Go to MG Cycle site. Under chemical they have Wruth SIG 3000. and they will ship internationally.


Ted Porter also has spline lube and I'm sure he also will ship internationally.


Worst case if you find something only avalaible in the USA buy it and have it shipped to me. I'll then readdress it and ship it out internationally via the United States Postal System.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Worst case if you find something only avalaible in the USA buy it and have it shipped to me. I'll then readdress it and ship it out internationally via the United States Postal System.
That's a very kind offer, thanks a lot!

Digging on German forums I finally found the correct stuff. I swear I've been looking for days now...

Thanks a lot everyone!
 

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Don't forget to carefully inspect the rubber boot. This rubber boot could touch the drive shaft in some circumstances, creating a tiny puncture and water ingress.
Do use a lot of that white lithium grease on the mating surface between the rubber boot and swing arm. It acts as barrier for water ingress. Compared to previous GS generation (K25), GS LC comes from factory with only small amount of this white grease. No wonder that water ingress case is quite high in GS LC.
 

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So the big rub is just about any EP grease or moly containing substance will work and anything is better than nothing. The problem the rear splines get all the attention as they are easily accessible. The upper splines (transmission side) rarely get any love. It is just as important to clean/inspect and lube these splines. It does take more effort but the driveline can be removed/reinstalled w/o removing the swingarm and rear drive.

This si for Hex/Camheads but assuming the WC stuff is very close.

1. Remove rear wheel
2. Remove rear wheel caliper and speedo sensor and hang out of the way
3. Remove the bolt at the top of the trailing arm at the rear drive
4. Hinge rear drive down
5. Remove the lower bolt of the rear shock and swing out of the swing arm housing (you make have to remove the muffler to access the bolt.
6. Put a jack under the swingarm and jack it up until its level
7. Cut the zip tie at the transmission rubber boot boss and pry back the rubber boot
8. Inert screwdriver at the face for the upper u-joint spline and rest it against the transmission housing boss. Move the screwdriver front to pry the u-joint of the transmission output shaft. It will move about 1/2"
9. Now move to the rear of the bike and grab the rear U-joint and pull the driveshaft out of the bike. It will take a bit of fenagling possibly some cursing and maybe a little more working the splines from the upper end but it will come out.

Once put clean, inspect and lube all the splines on the transmission, rear drive, and drive shaft. Lightly coat the driveshaft with a film of bearing grease and reverse the process.
 

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I just did a “pre-emptive” replacement of the drive shaft on my ’14 R1200GSw. I have 75K on mine and the first check at 60K revealed a lot of rust – I know of two local riders that have had a u-joint break, each at about 90K – one was the rear, the other the front which took out the engine case.

A pretty easy and straight forward procedure:

1. Remove rear wheel
2. Remove rear wheel caliper and speedo sensor and hang out of the way
3. Remove the bolt at the top of the trailing arm at the rear drive.
4. Pull back the rear boot
4A. Hinge rear drive down – the spine "should" come free of the shaft - I suggest that you have a bar or screw driver placed in the front u-joint to hold it on the front shaft; I do not think having the front come off before the rear is desirable.
5. I put a jack under the hosing a lifted a bit (careful to not bend the ESA rod) – the factory manual says to disconnect and then “recalibrate” – I talked to my local master tech who said he doesn’t disconnect the ESA rod… I had no issues by leaving it connected – but again be careful to not bend it as you jack up the swingarm housing – it will not lift to “level” but enough to allow you get the shaft out.
6. Pull forward the front boot – I did not have to cut the factory wire-tie and was able to push it forward enough for good access. The OEM wire tie looked a little odd sized (thin width) and I was not sure I had a replacement on hand.
6. I sprayed the spines with a powerful 3M penetrate and let things sit for a few hours. My rear spine came apart pretty easy – the front was well fused by rust and took some VERY careful use of a pry bar to get apart. (This is what led to me pulling off the final drive housing)
6A. I ultimately removed the bolt and pulled the rear drive to <carefully> use a dremel with a thin wire brush to clean the spines of rust. Be careful to not hit the seal with the tool
(I found a bit of standing water in the lowest area of the swingarm housing)
7. Both spines where cleaned with the dermal tool (wire brush)
8. Once I had the spines clean and free of rust I lightly coated the u-joints of the new drive shaft with marine grease before assembly.
9. I noticed that the swing arm casting has a small “boss”; probably from a mold pin at the low point as mounted on the bike. I drilled a 1/8’ hole as a drain – I have a piece of electrical tape covering it to prevent dust intrusion – I want to see if I get water after a rain or after a few miles from condensation. (Not yet confirmed)
10. I liberally coated splines with Honda Moly Assembly lube – wear gloves, this is some messy stuff and it will get everywhere J
11. The assembly is simply the reverse – getting the front spline on takes some patience – I ultimately found a large screw driver allowed me to keep the u-joint aligned to get the spline started on the shaft.
12. Use a coating of white lithium grease on the rubber boots to prevent water from seeping in.

From my observations I think the cush rubbers in the shaft start to degrade and the rusted u-joints are weakened enough that the added jolt (and fused splines) lead to potential u-joint breakage.

I noticed with the new drive shaft that my wheel did not have as large of “free” rotation space before the shaft engaged - the wheel felt much less "sloppy" after the new shaft was installed.

I plan to make my driveshaft spines a 25K service item going forward.
 

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Discussion Starter · #17 ·
4A. Hinge rear drive down – the spine "should" come free of the shaft - I suggest that you have a bar or screw driver placed in the front u-joint to hold it on the front shaft; I do not think having the front come off before the rear is desirable.
Well, I can't move past this step.
 

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Hi all,

Before the summer hits, I want to do some maintenance to my 2016's 1200GS LC. I have more or less everything set up, except for the end drive grease. I want to inspect and grease it. I bought the bike used and I don't know if any maintenance has been done there.

The problem I have is that I can't seem to find the correct grease and I don't know enough about the topic to do an educated guess about a substitute. As far as I know, the recommended grease for the end drive is the Castrol Molub-Alloy TA, which is not available on Amazon Germany nor is available on some known German retailers such as Louis or Polo. I also searched other on-line stores to no avail.

Now, does somebody know any worthy substitute for this Castrol grease? Anything a bit more available to the general public? Maybe a German member?

Any help is appreciated!
Appropriate grease isn't available in Germany where the bike is manufactured???
 

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Discussion Starter · #20 ·
Appropriate grease isn't available in Germany where the bike is manufactured???
Appropriate grease is available, but not the one BMW themselves use. The Castrol Alloy whatever is nowhere to be found. That‘s why I asked for alternatives
 
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