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What is your philosophy about how you plan and ride a trip where you're going to be headed farther from home after your first and subsequent nights on the go?

Are you the kind of rider that is much comforted by knowing exactly where you'll be with hotel or camp site reservations ahead of time? If you are, how often do you find yourself stopping for the day when you've got more riding left in your personal tank? How often does that turn in to an end of day grind to get there? Or how often does that leave you skipping some serendipitous fun because you wouldn't make the destination to which you've more or less committed?

Conversely, maybe you're the kind of adventurer that isn't concerned with how many miles a day you'll ride? You have a total travel window when you need to be back home but otherwise you're comfortable just winging it - maybe sorting out where you're going to lay your head on a pillow only a few hours before you need it? Does this attitude lend itself to unplanned experiences that you might otherwise skip? I call this the "I've got nowhere to be and all day to get there" attitude. How often does this approach leave you in a bind finding a place to call it a day?

It's my experience that there's a continuum of attitudes but many riders cluster around one end or the other of that spectrum. I've ridden some big trips with a rider that was anxious and not at all comfortable not knowing that he had a hotel reservation or camp site with his name on it every day. When I've tried to get those guys to just let it go they just do not enjoy the ride as much. On the other end, I've been on small group rides where everything was planned. It inevitably happened that there was someone interesting to spend time talking to; or, some side trip to see something they might never see again where they had to either skip it to stay with the group or get left behind. Asking one type of rider to adventure using the other philosophy is like asking a right handed person to write an essay left handed. They can maybe do it but they won't enjoy it nearly as much.

Perhaps more simply stated is your epic ride to get away from the structured and well organized life you live every day; or, is it a continuation of those planning skills that make your ride more enjoyable?

I'm not setting this up as a poll to leave room for a lot of different attitudes and philosophies about how you approach a big epic trip. Let's year yours!
 

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That's hard. Every trip is different but I do like to start around 7 and want a destination hotel at the end of each day arriving between 3 and 6pm. Unless I'm going through the hot desert. That's when I move everything up 2-3 hours.
I prefer to ride alone or with one person. I also try very hard to avoid any interstate. I'm retired so I don't have a time limit.
 

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2014 R1200 GS Lowered Chassis
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81 Posts
I take great pleasure in planning the route out in Google Maps, then going on this forum, ADV Rider, and the GL1800Riders.com sites to ask about good roads not to miss... that's a really important part!

Then I estimate how much time I want to leave for unplanned surprises (good and bad) and plan a motel location where we can park and walk to a restaurant so no worries about drinking and driving!

I transfer the route to my Navigator V or Garmin Zumo 550 depending on which bike I am riding, dividing up the trip into a separate route for each day. If something comes up that makes the plan unworkable (like 111F° temps in Arizona last June) I carry a little WIndows notebook computer and work on the changes, then re-download to the GPS.

We're not into camping, so each of the two or three guys I ride with divide up the responsibilities for making hotel/Motel/ B&B/VRBO/AirBnB reservations. That way, we get a variety of types of lodging.

From the Denver, Colorado metro area, we've traveled all over so if you want GPX files with some great routes, just PM me!

David
 

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Bobmanz
2018 R1200GSA
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32 Posts
Not yet retired, so this means I'll need to reasonably stick to a somewhat set itinerary (unless when I reach say Moose Jaw, the cool name far exceeds the cool factor of the town, which then I just keep riding). Usually try keeping it in the 400-450 mile range give or take, or 6-7 hrs total riding/fuel/quick snack time/day. Again, this is usually bc I have a set return by date, and must cover x-miles to achieve this, which almost always means no down days. Always pack for camping, yet prefer cheap hotels, yet I'll never make reservations. Prefer riding solo, just easier when you only have to please yourself, and can changing things up on the fly. Once I retire and am no longer on someone else's clock, then I'll be a bit less structured with itinerary, and maybe even hang out in a spot more than a day.
 

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Bobmanz
2018 R1200GSA
Joined
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32 Posts
I take great pleasure in planning the route out in Google Maps, then going on this forum, ADV Rider, and the GL1800Riders.com sites to ask about good roads not to miss... that's a really important part!

Then I estimate how much time I want to leave for unplanned surprises (good and bad) and plan a motel location where we can park and walk to a restaurant so no worries about drinking and driving!

I transfer the route to my Navigator V or Garmin Zumo 550 depending on which bike I am riding, dividing up the trip into a separate route for each day. If something comes up that makes the plan unworkable (like 111F° temps in Arizona last June) I carry a little WIndows notebook computer and work on the changes, then re-download to the GPS.

We're not into camping, so each of the two or three guys I ride with divide up the responsibilities for making hotel/Motel/ B&B/VRBO/AirBnB reservations. That way, we get a variety of types of lodging.

From the Denver, Colorado metro area, we've traveled all over so if you want GPX files with some great routes, just PM me!

David
Hey D from D, I too would develop my routes in Google Maps, then transfer to my Zumo 590 (Basecamp is just not user friendly to me), however, the problem I always ran into was despite having saved routes in my Zumo, the unit would invariably default to whatever setting (faster, shorter, etc.) was in the unit, overriding my saved route. Now unless I was in such a remote area where the alternate routes were far and few between, I found myself being routed NOT where I had planned. I figured that maybe by disabling the faster/shorted/etc feature would solve this issue, but this wasn't even an option on my 590. I've since (unfortunately) totaled the bike/sold the 590, and now have a Nav VI on my current bike, but have yet to have any opportunity to see if the same situation occurs. Is this something you have any experience with, with your Nav V? Thanks!
 

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Registered
2014 R1200 GS Lowered Chassis
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81 Posts
Hey D from D, I too would develop my routes in Google Maps, then transfer to my Zumo 590 (Basecamp is just not user friendly to me), however, the problem I always ran into was despite having saved routes in my Zumo, the unit would invariably default to whatever setting (faster, shorter, etc.) was in the unit, overriding my saved route. Now unless I was in such a remote area where the alternate routes were far and few between, I found myself being routed NOT where I had planned. I figured that maybe by disabling the faster/shorted/etc feature would solve this issue, but this wasn't even an option on my 590. I've since (unfortunately) totaled the bike/sold the 590, and now have a Nav VI on my current bike, but have yet to have any opportunity to see if the same situation occurs. Is this something you have any experience with, with your Nav V? Thanks!
I import my Google Map into Basecamp, swear a little, hold my mouth just right, and am able to review and correct any errors. Then I download to the Navigator V or Garmin Zumo and the routes come in just about perfect. This extra step matches the map in Basecamp with the map in the GPS, so all the via points and waypoints get transferred correctly. Still, every now and then, a route will have a section that is not what I planned. So I preview the route in the GPS to see if it it is correct, and if not, I correct it just using the GPS, or if it is really bad, go back and correct it in Basecamp then re-upload it to the GPS.

Being a bit OCD helps! :LOL:

David
 

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Premium Member
2017 R1200GS
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36 Posts
This rings of the dichotomy set up in Zen and the Art of Motorcycle Maintenance (which I last read over 20 years ago). But what is best, Phaedrus?
 

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Bobmanz
2018 R1200GSA
Joined
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32 Posts
I import my Google Map into Basecamp, swear a little, hold my mouth just right, and am able to review and correct any errors. Then I download to the Navigator V or Garmin Zumo and the routes come in just about perfect. This extra step matches the map in Basecamp with the map in the GPS, so all the via points and waypoints get transferred correctly. Still, every now and then, a route will have a section that is not what I planned. So I preview the route in the GPS to see if it it is correct, and if not, I correct it just using the GPS, or if it is really bad, go back and correct it in Basecamp then re-upload it to the GPS.

Being a bit OCD helps! :LOL:

David
Thank you, David!

Regards,

Bob
 
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