R1200GS Forum banner

1 - 7 of 7 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
1 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
Hi,

I am new to the forum and to the adventure bikes in general and to the R1200GS in particular. Recently (about a month ago), I have traded my 2014 HD to 2006 R1200GS. Friends told me that was not equal trade, but I do not regret. I love the way the bike feels on the road. I didn't take it off road so far, still getting used to it.

And, of course, one of my buddies, when he saw me on that bike, recommended me "The Ghost Rider" book by Neil Peart. Great book, btw. What I noted that Neil is always mentions that he was able to make at least 250 miles on a single tank on his r1100gs, previous model of r1200gs. Mine doesn't make even close to that. I was able to squeeze only 150 miles (the reserve signal turns on after about a 110 miles).

I have asked an opinion of a BMW service associate and he told me that many people have similar fuel consumptions, but the same dealership BMW service manager owns a year older bike with over than 250 thousands miles on it and he says he is able to make over 220 miles on a single tank.

Does anyone encounter similar problem?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,923 Posts
How many gallons are you adding when you fill up?

If I fill up when my "fuel low" light comes on and the odometer switches to range mode with typically 40-50 miles range I can add around 4 gallons with a standard GS. If you are adding much less than that your fuel gage is not well calibrated.

I can also usually add about 1/2 gallon to the tank after the pump automatic shut off is triggered.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
338 Posts
My '07 had a 5.6 gal tank IIRC, not very big. If your bike has a fuel strip you should not trust your fuel gauge as the strip is notoriously unreliable and why BMW stopped using them. I would usually ride for 170 miles on a tank and then start looking for fuel, got north of 200 miles a few times if I rode sensibly which I typically don't do. If you keep the hard cases on they act as a big air drag and with my '07 anything above 75 mph would really see the mileage drop. You should figure your average mpg over several tanks of fuel using actual miles and fuel consumed and forget what anybody else gets for mileage. It's a bit like one guy gets 10K miles on a set of tires that I burn up in 3K, riding style and aggressive throttle (or lack of) makes all the difference. When riding off road or cross country I would often carry a Rotopax with a gallon of fuel, it saved me many times in some very remote areas.
 

·
I'd rather be flying
Joined
·
236 Posts
I have a 2005 and a 2014.

On the 2005 I performed the canisterectomy which removes the charcoal canister and the return lines to the injectors. By doing so, I could remove the rubber insert in the gas tank which provided me with about 0.5 gallons more fuel in the tank. So my overall fuel tank capacity is about 5.5 gallons. I consistently get between 42 and 44 miles per gallon. If I'm going slower or riding downhill A LOT, I can get as high as 59 mpg. I pressed it once and got over 250 miles out of one tank. The dash displayed 9 miles remaining when I fueled up.

On my 2014 it gives me all of the pertinent information on the dash. Shows me mpg and miles remaining. I've only had the bike for a three or four weeks and about 1300 miles. I haven't done any modifications and I don't think that I will. It's such an outstanding bike. The display shows me that I'm getting about 45 mpg on the freeway at around 80 miles per hour. I took it off-road last week and averaged about 51 mpg. But there is a flaw. The speedometer has about a 3 mph discrepancy. It shows 30 when I'm going 27. It's consistently 3 mph high at all speeds above 0. So I cannot yet say that it truly is getting 45 on the highway. If I use the GPS then I'm certain I could get an accurate reading. But that is not what you are here for.

I had a problem on my 2005 where one of the quick-connects on the fuel pump cracked and it began seeping fuel. I did notice that fuel economy went down slightly and fuel smell went up significantly. Remove the side panels and check the quick-connects. There's one on the fuel pump on the upper, left side. And the other one is on the right side of the tank. Check for fuel leaking. Also check for a gas smell.

You also may have an imbalance on the throttle bodies. This is a simple check. Play with the throttle while the bike is off. The butterfly valves should close at the exact same time. If you let the throttle close and you hear two distinct closures of the valves, you need a sync. But this isn't a perfect method. Better to use vacuum tubes.

Lastly, I would suggest changing your oil, spark plugs and air filter. You can buy the kit from beemer boneyard. It's about $80 without oil and the best price you'll ever find. Get the one with oil and it's about $120. Change all 4 plugs. Inspect the old ones. Change your differential oil. Lube the splines. Check your valve clearance. I recommend all of this regardless of the problems that you might have with the bike.

But in the end, remember that the 2005 and 2006 had odd fuel gauges. They don't show actual fuel remaining until the tank is half empty. You might have a faulty fuel sending unit (in the fuel pump). You should measure your fuel consumption at the pump before you rely too heavily on the gauge. It may be that your bike is telling you that it's empty when it's got a couple of gallons left.

I hope that some of this helps. If you're in Southern Utah, I'd be happy to help you with a bike service. Everything from headlight fluid to pressurizing the exhaust. :wink2:
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,923 Posts
I hit a new high on my '13 about 10 days ago coming over Tioga pass where slow traffic and speed limits that max out about 45 MPH are the norm. Also I was going east-to-west which has more downhill than uphill. I got 54 MPG. My typical mileage is about 10 MPG less than that.
 
1 - 7 of 7 Posts
Top