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Discussion Starter #1
When considering a well cared-for used bike, how many miles would you consider to be a lot? Is there a threshold at which a high-mileage bike requires more minor maintenance, or possibly even major work?

Thanks all.
 

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I have 75k miles on my 04 and feels like it has many more miles left to do. Like any bike check the service history and general condition.
 

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I maintain my bikes so that they always run and look like new. When something wears out, breaks or gets damaged, I’m quick to replace it. Before it was squashed by a cager a few months ago, my 2012 R1200R had over 92,000 miles on it; but it looked and ran like it was new. My 2015 K1600 GT has over 50,000 miles on it and it too looks like a Beauty Queen.
Before giving up my pilot’s license to inability to keep my medical cert., I flew planes that were as old as I was. Go to any private plane classifieds and take a gander at how old the planes that are being bought and sold are. Planes must go through rigorous maintenance schedules and inspections. Not many fall out of the sky and when they do, it’s usually not due to age or hours in service. I have often said that motorcycling is the closest thing to flying.
Moral of the story: It’s not the age of the machine, it’s the way it’s been maintained.
 

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My 2006 GS turned 50,000 miles as I was riding it home from the dealer three years ago. It's now at 70,000. Along the way I've had a few problems, all of which were minor (see detailed list below). Records left by the previous owner showed only one failure, an early-style electronic fuel pump controller that was superseded by a much more reliable and robust one. And, of course, there were recalls for fuel pump and rear wheel flange, all done before I bought the bike. I also replaced back rotor and pads, and shocks at both ends, but that's just normal wear and tear stuff. These machines are made to last a long time.

TMI: the list of problems I've had in 20,000 miles and three years...

1) rubber boot on Telelever ball joint tore from age. Replacement part was $30, installation required a floor jack, wrench, Allen socket, and zip-tie.

2) clutch lever interlock switch didn't work, so I couldn't start the bike in gear. Fixing this required tightening a loose set screw and adjusting the switch's position. Cost nothing.

3) gear position indicator and neutral light started having trouble finding neutral (bike would be in neutral, green light off, position display blank). Fixed by unplugging the potentiometer, squirting in some contact cleaner, turning ignition on and off, reconnecting and going for a ride during which the computer apparently matched speed and rpm data to resistance and properly re-programmed things. Cost nothing beyond a squirt of contact cleaner.

4) final drive seal failed. This is the only problem that disrupted a trip, as it happened about 200 miles from home on the first day of a trip to Utah. I had no idea how much lube had leaked out, and didn't want to destroy a $2500 gearbox, so I brought the bike home on a trailer and went to Utah on my Harley instead. Had I known that the proper lube level was just below the plug in the back of the pumpkin (something I found in a Jim von Baden comment on this site after I got back from Utah), I would have bought some shop towels and a bottle of lube, and continued until I could get to a dealer and buy the seal. The seal itself is $30 and can be replaced in under a half-hour using only a screwdriver.
 
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