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...... That's not to say that a GS wouldn't make a good cross country touring bike but there are other bikes that would be much better at munching the miles.
I most certainly disagree with THAT statement! I can't think of a bike that gets as good mileage, carries as much, handles as well, and is as much fun to ride. Unless of course you never get off the Interstates....in that case a Gold Wing might be the ticket. And I've ridden a K1600....vastly prefer the GS.
 

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lots of good advice,but your experience will be your own. Learn from others, but learn from yourself also.
It makes a big difference whether you are going with another rider(s) or going solo. I would add a couple of things though. Consider a SPOT device. Look it up. Also, I am not in the smaller bike is better camp, even for a relatively new rider. For this reason, Many times, especially if you are riding out west you will be exposed to severe headwinds and cross winds, There have been many times when I welcomed the "heft" of the roadster or the GS over a 700 or even a 800in dealing with 30+mph crosswinds. If you are afraid of loss of stability with a bigger bike at low speeds, stop lights, etc, consider getting the low suspension version.
Make sure you travel with a couple or 3 credit cards, in case you lose one, and a good cell phone. You Will be out of cell coverage much of the time, so do not trust it for its gps functions, for that you'll need a dedicated gps, AND maps good enough to get you where you're going. AAA maps are good enough in my experience.If you are traveling via interstate the whole way--what fun is that--you won't need special stuff, but if you are on obscure backroads, you will.

word of warning: what tools do you tak is akin to tire threads and oil tthreads:wink2:

hope this helps
John
 

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Discussion Starter #43
I ran into the problem with GPS two summers ago when my brother and I drove out west in his car, Ford Focus ST. Drove from Chicago to Breckenridge, Arches, Vegas, Joshua Tree, San Jacinto, Sequoia, Yosemite and home to Chicago. Great car for the trip if anyone is curious. Looking to do similar adventures on a motorcycle now.

Thanks for the advice and all everyone.
 

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I most certainly disagree with THAT statement! I can't think of a bike that gets as good mileage, carries as much, handles as well, and is as much fun to ride. Unless of course you never get off the Interstates....in that case a Gold Wing might be the ticket. And I've ridden a K1600....vastly prefer the GS.
Good to know...

The OP asked for advice/information/opinions and I gave him mine. Someone else suggested a SPOT tracker. Good advice!

It's safe to say that traveling across the country by motorcycle requires a lot of thought and preparation, for yourself (rider skills), the choice of bike (what fits you best and how it's equipped), and last but not least, what you wear from head to toe.
I'll make another suggestion for the OP. You should consider purchasing good raingear and prior to your trip, watch the weather forecast and when it's raining, gear up and go out for and good long ride in it. This will pay off in many ways. Builds your confidence and skill, tests your gear for problems and to make sure it works! :grin2:
 

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Discussion Starter #45
Let's all remember, you have to want to ride the bike you are taking on any trip. If one wants to take a Bonneville cross country, it will be the best bike for them to take cross country, regardless of whether or not it really is the best bike to take cross country.
 

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It takes very little experience to ride cross other than knowing the right stuff to pack and dealing with adverse weather and road conditions. It takes a lot more skill and knowledge to ride safely in a city with thousands of distracted idiot drivers.
 
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