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Discussion Starter #1
I recently installed a Hydralift motorcycle carrier on my motorhome. Its big. Its heavy but it can haul a full size R1250GSA. Its so stable I can get on the bike while its locked into position. The plan is to tour the country then explore the different areas on the GSA two up.

Here are a couple photographs of the bike loaded. Please ignore the cheap straps and where they are attached. It was just a trial load. I have all new straps for long hauls. I have also installed lights strips since the bike blocks the tail lights on the coach. The carrier folds up when Im not towing a bike and for storage.
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Thank you for sharing, looks like a dream motorhome. Good luck in adventure :)
 

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Consider adjusting tie down points. The crash bars are not a good place. If you tie down right above the fork brace it allow the front wheel to be rigidly secured to the platform while allowing the suspension to move/float with bump in the road. For the rear wheel either throw a strap over the tire all you're doing is keeping it from moving around. The wheel chock and front straps hold the bike upright.

Too many folks bind the suspension down. That is harder on the bike than letting it float.

The hitch set up looks to be the bee's knees. (y)

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Skychs, Fantastic!! I have been thinking about this recently, whether to do something like this so I wouldn't always need to tow around a box trailer.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Looks good. How it is attached to the vehicle ?
The mount is welded to the back of the frame. Its heavy but very sturdy.

PerazziMX14 .... Thanks for the advise. The photo was taken during the initial set up. I would never haul a bike via the crash bars. I have 4 fresh straps to Haul this thing around the country.

Skychs, Fantastic!! I have been thinking about this recently, whether to do something like this so I wouldn't always need to tow around a box trailer.
Thanks. One thing I like about the carrier is ..... you can still drag a car or trailer behind the lift. The plan is to eventually add a Jeep Wrangler to the back.
 

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I knew a guy who put a Goldwing on one, so putting a puny thing like a GS on one will be fine ;) . It hung out past the edges of the motorhome but not beyond the mirrors, so although technically illegal he didn't get flak about it. He said the tires kicked up all kinds of crap and the wind back there made him worry about a cover chafing. I saw another guy with bicycles on the back of his RV and the cover just ballooned up to expose the bikes. If you're going to cover it, you might want to have someone follow you and video what happens to the cover at highway speeds.

Your owner's manual will give tiedown points. I think they recommend the passenger footpegs but that seems sketchy to me, if the bike bounces on the suspension it will shock load the tiedown - RV up/bike "down" = slack in tiedown, RV down/bike "up" = sudden tension in tiedown, eventually broken footpeg/broken tiedown. Soft tie above the lower fork leg looks good though.

It looks like a wonderful traveling setup, enjoy it!
 

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I knew a guy who put a Goldwing on one, so putting a puny thing like a GS on one will be fine ;) . It hung out past the edges of the motorhome but not beyond the mirrors, so although technically illegal he didn't get flak about it. He said the tires kicked up all kinds of crap and the wind back there made him worry about a cover chafing. I saw another guy with bicycles on the back of his RV and the cover just ballooned up to expose the bikes. If you're going to cover it, you might want to have someone follow you and video what happens to the cover at highway speeds.

Your owner's manual will give tiedown points. I think they recommend the passenger footpegs but that seems sketchy to me, if the bike bounces on the suspension it will shock load the tiedown - RV up/bike "down" = slack in tiedown, RV down/bike "up" = sudden tension in tiedown, eventually broken footpeg/broken tiedown. Soft tie above the lower fork leg looks good though.

It looks like a wonderful traveling setup, enjoy it!
And why its suggested that you tie down unspring parts and let the sprung parts "float'
 

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I tow my bike on a trailer all the time. Finally sprung for a Geza Cover.... supposedly rated for 100MPH towing....Will be getting it in a couple of weeks. Check out their site if you don't have a cover for your bike behind that monster RV yet.... GEZA GEAR | Stretch Fit Custom Motorcycle Covers... I went with the 'half'... you might want the 'full'.

I will also respond back to this thread on what I think about it once I've used it a few times. I travel full-time and will be getting the cover when I am in Eureka Springs, AR....I was hoping to ride the next leg of our journey, so the next trailer trip after that will be about an 800 mile trip after that... that should test it well!
 

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@skychs I'm quite jealous of your setup. Looks awesome (coach, carrier and bike). Still working on my wife to do an RV early in retirement.

BTW ... glad the crew here was easier on you than that rough crowd at GS Giants!
:D
 

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Discussion Starter #11
Thanks guys.....

I have been talking to GezaGear about one of their covers. Ill probably go with the half cover. It really does seem like the best option. I take my first trip with the GSA next week so Ill get a good idea of what's going on back there. The rear camera on the RV does a great job watching the bike.

Krons ........ I didn't expect all the responses I got on GS Giants but its all good. Among all the crazy responses was some good advise.
 

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Krons ........ I didn't expect all the responses I got on GS Giants but its all good. Among all the crazy responses was some good advise.
It's an interesting dynamic over there, some good people but also heaps of smart remarks. Need some thick skin to post stuff...especially if not a GS person (even though they are an all brand group).
 

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Interesting discussion on correct way to tie down a GS.


In my owners manual for my 2018 GS on page 135 it says:
'Fasten front straps to both sides of the handlebars'
'Guide straps through leading link and then tension'
'Secure and tighten the luggage straps at the rear on the brackets for the passenger footrests on both sides'
'Tension all straps evenly; the motorcycle should be pulled down against it's springs with the suspension compressed as much as possible.'

On page 134 it has a picture with the straps definitely attached to the handlebars on the inside of the brake fluid reservoir.

Now I'm confused!



Consider adjusting tie down points. The crash bars are not a good place. If you tie down right above the fork brace it allow the front wheel to be rigidly secured to the platform while allowing the suspension to move/float with bump in the road. For the rear wheel either throw a strap over the tire all you're doing is keeping it from moving around. The wheel chock and front straps hold the bike upright.

Too many folks bind the suspension down. That is harder on the bike than letting it float.

The hitch set up looks to be the bee's knees. (y)

View attachment 28050
 

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Interesting discussion on correct way to tie down a GS.


In my owners manual for my 2018 GS on page 135 it says:
'Fasten front straps to both sides of the handlebars'
'Guide straps through leading link and then tension'
'Secure and tighten the luggage straps at the rear on the brackets for the passenger footrests on both sides'
'Tension all straps evenly; the motorcycle should be pulled down against it's springs with the suspension compressed as much as possible.'

On page 134 it has a picture with the straps definitely attached to the handlebars on the inside of the brake fluid reservoir.

Now I'm confused!
This is not GS specific its pertains to all bikes.

Compressing the suspension as you are describing really over stresses it along with handlebars. I much prefer securing the unsprung parts and letting the sprung parts float.

I have sold a few bikes and I used to give input on how to tie them down. Now unless the buyer asks I let them do what they want. Most of the time they bind the bike down so tightly to the truck/trailer bed you could play a "A sharp" not on the ratchet strap. I also like when they put the bike on side stand then bind it down with 6 or 8 ratchet straps.

I use a wheel chock with 2 straps up from as shown in my earlier picture pulling the bike forward towards the truck/trailer bulkhead. Honestly thats plenty to hold the bike for a mile or across the country. It cannot go forward, backwards, side to side nor can the front wheel turn. More straps really do not do much of anything other than if you put one over the rear to keep it planted.
 

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This is not GS specific its pertains to all bikes.

Compressing the suspension as you are describing really over stresses it along with handlebars. I much prefer securing the unsprung parts and letting the sprung parts float.

I have sold a few bikes and I used to give input on how to tie them down. Now unless the buyer asks I let them do what they want. Most of the time they bind the bike down so tightly to the truck/trailer bed you could play a "A sharp" not on the ratchet strap. I also like when they put the bike on side stand then bind it down with 6 or 8 ratchet straps.

I use a wheel chock with 2 straps up from as shown in my earlier picture pulling the bike forward towards the truck/trailer bulkhead. Honestly thats plenty to hold the bike for a mile or across the country. It cannot go forward, backwards, side to side nor can the front wheel turn. More straps really do not do much of anything other than if you put one over the rear to keep it planted.
I just thought it was interesting that what i quoted above was directly from the BMW owners manual for the 2018 R1200GS. I agree fully compressing the suspension for extended periods sounds strange....
 

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It might have been the law department writing that segment of the owners manual to take out most if not all human error and no regard for the bikes wellness. Kind of like the universal engine breakin process that is the same in every UJM manual no matter single, twin, triple, 4 or 6 cylinder.
 

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Discussion Starter #17
I've done a lot of trailering over the years with a bike tied down front to rear. The side to side set up with the Hydralift is a different animal all together. The stress on the straps during acceleration and braking are much higher. I would never consider anything less than 4 ratchet straps.

Its going to take me a couple trips to figure out the best place to attach them. Some of the guys even suggested placing something under the bike (blocks) to keep it from bouncing. I will try to post a photo of the tie downs next week when I start the trip.
 
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