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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
I recently bought a wonderful used R1200GS, my only gripe being, i feel like i have to constantly change gears, especially for city commute. I am at about 25mph on 3rd gear and it feels like the bike continuously wants me to go a gear up, so i end up at 4th gear when i am at 30mph. Isn't that a bit much? this results in too much gear shift (both up and down).

Prior to this i used to ride a honda vtx1300 cruiser, and i used to easily go upto 40mph on gear 2 without any issues.

Thanks for your inputs in advance!


Edit: Its a 2016 R1200GS
 

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Boxers like some RPMs. 2500/3000 is good. Drive the tach in traffic and stay in a gear that that keeps your RPMs up. Lugging along isn't good for performance, the engine or gas mileage. A lower gear also has the benefit of engine braking when you get off the throttle.
 

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What he said, above.

I own both a GS and a Harley Road King, and it took a while to get used to the different feel of the two engines. The Harley is quite happy to putt along at 2000 rpm, and will respond happily if I whack the throttle at that speed. The GS really feels like I'm lugging it anywhere below 2500, and a quick twist of the throttle is met with little real ooomph if it's under 3000.

In addition, the Boxer's busy valve train is sticking out on the sides, and the valve covers are not stuffed with sound insulation, so you will hear a lot of mechanical racket that's muffled by the gas tank on a V-twin bike. The engine does sound rather busy at fairly low rpm. I suspect that's what's making you feel like it wants you to shift up a gear. That's just the way it is and not a problem.

Stick with it, pay attention to the tach, and one day you will notice that it suddenly feels all natural and right.
 

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what year?
2016 here and riding in the congested narrow streets of New Orleans--lots of stop and go, school zones, 30-35 mph speed limits, threading through traffic, etc. IOW, not fast.

At 30 mph I am probably in 2nd, maybe third???, but probably second.
As been said these engines loved to be flogged, and run up, and run hard (the so-called Italian tune up). Depending on year, at least 2k rpms, maybe 3k for later models--according to the wisdom on the internet. And that feels right for control in city traffic.
So, the next question you may ask is where are the shift points, and that is definitely personal and depends on circumstances...may be 3500-4 k or higher. If I am not hooliganing and in well paced city riding, probably 4k, though I use engine braking a lot in the city.
If you are under 2 k, you are lugging the engine.

I will add that when I got the 2016 it replaced a 2009 roadster. On that 2009 I felt like I was always searching for the gear between 2nd and 3rd in the city. On the 16, one of the first things I noticed was how it felt better geared for city traffic.
 

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My riding habits are similar to those of Rick92040. Riding below 3,000 RMP is somewhat rare on the street.

I may cruise down city streets at 3,xxx RPM. I'm probably between 4K and 6K having fun in the twisties. On trails in enduro mode I may be in the 2,xxx range in 2nd gear.
 

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Got my 2017 1200 GSA registered and on the road two days ago and already have found my self in 4th at 65 MPH and not thinking anything about it. But when I do realize I bump er up to 6th...My point is when you have a 9000 RPM red line dont be afraid to give her a good spin!!
 

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On my 2018 adventure I have tried the BMW guide arrow above the gear indicator to change gears recently and was surprised to find it worked really well. It was a bit like driving an automatic car in commuter mode, not gunning it but just sticking to the speed limit.
The big difference I found was the fuel consumption dropped from about 4.5l per 100km to 3.8l
 

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It sounds like your driving your motorcycle like a tractor. As mentioned there is plenty of room below the red line. Common with a new to you bike specially when your going from one engine configuration to another. You can't ring it's neck like an inline 4 but you can't John Deere it like a Harley either. Soon it'll be like breathing, you won't even think about it.
 

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Turn off the up-shift indicator if you have one, also.

Mine constantly nags me to ride in a much higher gear than practical.
 
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