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Hi all, new to the board here. Just got a 2016 GS. I'm planning a coast-to-coast trip later this summer, and I'm just wondering, are there any spare parts I could bring along that would save me a headache if they fail in the middle of nowhere? Beside the obvious - fuses, tire plugger, zip ties & duct tape, etc.
 

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Riding a 2009 R1200gs
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Unless you have added some electrical accessories, there are no fuses on recent BMW's (even on my old 2019, all is controlled by the 'computer' which cut the power on a circuit in case of short circuit or overload)

If you have aux lighting, heated clothing, then carry 2 spares of each fuses.

If you don't have LED or HID headlight, a spare bulb is nice to have.

Having your spare key hidden somewhere (in your jacket, not locked in your cases) can save the day.
 

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Maybe it sounds a bit pedantic, but rather than carrying "stuff" (that you'll likely not need) I would recommend having the bike's servicing completely up to date and not thinking you'll do it on the way. Even better is if you do it yourself to know the bike. You will then be able to see things that might mean a trip to the dealer before you leave, or a post here for advice.

The services, esp the 6k one, is easy. The 12k one is a bit more complex with changing the air filter and checking valve clearances, but very worthwhile to do...and don't be afraid of doing the service early. Make sure the bike is up to date on brake fluid flush, a 16 would likely have 2 by this time, initial and after 2 years.

Re tires...for me trickier, because I like to get maximum safe mileage out of them and that means close to the wear bars...I have changed them, at a dealer, along the way. If you prepare ahead for that it's cheaper, but logistically harder, usually takes half a day from your ride. Some dealers will fit you in immediately, others will not ( I have had good luck with Eurosports in Salem Va and Iowa City BMW, those places may be on your way, Sandia BMW motorcycles in ABQ and Santa fe are top notch also, and I like the peeps at the Transportation Revolution here in New Orleans).

So, I am facing a rear that has 1000+ miles left on it (I think) and a front in decent shape, do I change before I leave or along the way...the jury is out on that right now.

I don't take "spares" of anything, but do take the aforementioned things like the zip ties--including some stainless steel ones--duct tape, rubbing alcohol, instructions for my Sena, tire plugging, CO2 carts and a pump. I have the owners manual as a pdf on my phone.

WATER is probably your most important "spare" if you are crossing the US in the summer
 

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Always start with a fresh set of tires on any trip over 1000 miles. I've had to break of from a group a couple times thinking my tires would make the trip!
 

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Senile Member on 2006 GS
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There are plenty of dealers along the way. I wouldn't lug a bunch of spare parts you can get on the road.
IMHO.
Well, that one had me blowing milk out my nose from laughter...

There are plenty of dealers... unless you break down on a Sunday or Monday, in which case three-quarters of them will be closed and the remaining ones are too busy (or just to PO'd about having to work that day) to even bother seeing if they have the part you need in stock.

Yeah, my experience. Last summer. First day of the trip I'd bought my GS for and been planning for months. Bike ended up coming home on a trailer.

Always start with a fresh set of tires on any trip over 1000 miles. I've had to break of from a group a couple times thinking my tires would make the trip!
Wow, you must either take some long long trips or wear out tires really fast!

One of the nice things about keeping the same bike for a long time is that I've learned about how long tires last, and can generally maintain synchronization between tire wear and trip length. And yes, it does suck to have to make a tire replacement (often at the special "out-of-towner who needs a tire right now" rate) during a trip.
 

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I'd probably find out the known issue on your bike and carry a spare for that specific issue. For example, when I did Alaska to Argentina trip on a F650GS, the known issue is water pump failure so I had the water pump kit on me. Had first failure in Prince George BC Canada on way down to Latin America. Purchased second kit and had other failure in Chile. Replaced it but it was shortened and started to leak again after Ushuaia I patched the seeping hole and rode it to Uruguay where I sold the bike.

My '05 R1200GS, I would carry spare fuel pump. You need to find out your known issue and bring spare for it. Other than that I would not bother chugging along many spares because you can score plenty of parts and many can be to your hand within 2 days. Remember, BMW add 10% charge if you need something next day, which was my experience when I had to replace a new thermostat in Arizona.

Have fun on your trip!
 

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Is there one you recommend that fits that description? 18 GSA in particular.


I’ve always modified a regular plug socket...just grind it down lightly and evenly, it’s a low torque. Just take your time, it will work...


Sent from my iPad using Tapatalk
 

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Well, that one had me blowing milk out my nose from laughter...

There are plenty of dealers... unless you break down on a Sunday or Monday, in which case three-quarters of them will be closed and the remaining ones are too busy (or just to PO'd about having to work that day) to even bother seeing if they have the part you need in stock.

Yeah, my experience. Last summer. First day of the trip I'd bought my GS for and been planning for months. Bike ended up coming home on a trailer.



Wow, you must either take some long long trips or wear out tires really fast!

One of the nice things about keeping the same bike for a long time is that I've learned about how long tires last, and can generally maintain synchronization between tire wear and trip length. And yes, it does suck to have to make a tire replacement (often at the special "out-of-towner who needs a tire right now" rate) during a trip.
California riding is all about the curvy roads and they eat tires! I average 4K rear and 8K front on Shinko 705. The last 1000 miles go fast!
 

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great answers so far

I just came in from a 2100 mi jog from LA through Death Valley, Nevada, kissed Oregon and then down the coast to home. Have the regular services done beforehand, tire pressure gauge handy, Slime pump handy, spare keys on you and spare batteries for your heated jacket remote and SPOT. You can buy anything else outside of your normal tool spread. Don't hump oil for example. Keep it very light as you will remain nimble and you have a great bike.
 

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I have a 2015 R1200 GS Adventure and it has fuses. See page 132 of the handbook (for 2015 models, that is). Your owners handbook will tell you if you have fuses or not and where they are located. I rode my GS from North Carolina to Texas and back and did not need any spares. I have ridden all over France, Germany, Belgium and Austria and did not need spares. I did need to replace a tyre on my Texas trip and that was done by BMW Motorcycles of Baton Rouge. They also had the parts for the warranty recall that I was waiting for (for several months) and they completed that work at the same time. They were very accommodating. I always carry a small toolkit in addition to the screwdriver that lives under the rear seat so that if anything were ever to come loose, I have the tools needed to rectify that, but I do not carry a complete toolkit to tackle every job. So far, I have only needed the tools once when the gear shift pedal came loose and I was able to nip up the bolt. It is a good plan to have, and not need, rather than need and not have. Tools do take up space and weight but you can put together a basic kit that is in a small package (for peace of mind more than anything else) but unless you are are traveling around the world or are in some remote area you really do not need a “spares” kit with air filters and plugs and so on, but do consider taking a puncture repair kit and a few small tools (which might come in handy). As mentioned by others: water is about the best spare you will need. I also take paper maps (in case the GPS dies) and a list of dealers in case I do have a mishap. Also, have some sort of towing coverage for the worst case scenario and at least you can get somewhere to have repairs completed if needed. Regular servicing is worth doing and consider the tyre life or you will need to replace them while you are on your trip (which is what I had to do, but it was a planned event). Before undertaking a long trip, make sure your service history is up to date so the fluid levels are all correct and you have plenty of brake pad life, etc., and consider making a shorter “shake down” ride before the “big trip” just to make sure nothing is loose before you set off.
 
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