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I have been riding for years! I have had many dual sports, harleys, and other bikes but this is my first BMW. I got a pretty good deal I think. I just bought a 2005 BMW R1200GS, with 300 miles on it.... yes that's right a 2005 with 300 miles on it (and this is 2011). I had some hesitations about buying it because it was an early year for the 1200GS. But this is literally a new left over bike from 2005. So instead of paying 20k for a new one, i paid half of that. Seems like a steal to me! Let me know if I got screwed on this one, although I dont see how, everything on it is like new. Let me know too if there are problems that I need to keep an eye out for, like are these bikes known for having any kinds of problems? Thanks in advance guys I appreciate it.
 

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Sounds like the only problem you have to start out with is feeling bad for getting such a great deal. Watch out they do grow on you and make riding enjoyable again! :)
 

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Let me know too if there are problems that I need to keep an eye out for, like are these bikes known for having any kinds of problems?
Yes, just a few.... Failure of the fuel pump controller; failure of the immobiliser ring antenna (this will show as EWS failure on the display); failure of rear crankshaft oil seal and failure of gearbox oilseal (both of these will show as a smear of oil on the join between engine casing and gearbox on the right hand side of the bike); failure of the rear bevel drive oil seal and/or bearing. Lambda sensors have been known to fail. Brake discs sometimes warp as quickly as 3K miles on early bikes.

Also depending upon operating conditions, certain components are prone to corrosion. If riding in conditions where roads are salted, as well as taking the usual precautions of thoroughly washing the bike in cold water after every ride, you'd be advised to remove the plastic cover on the front engine casing and remove the foam pad which is underneath it. This soaks up salty water and retains it, promoting corrosion of the front cover.

Personally, I'd remove the mud flap thing from the rear wheel. It's on there to statisfy German TÜV regulations regarding rear bumper height. All it manages to do, in practice, is to send a jet of cold, dirty water at the back of your left leg from thigh to ankle when riding in wet conditions.

Keep a close eye on the oil level when you're running in (breaking in) the engine. It's likely to use more than you think.

Also, if you're a spirited rider, you'll probably want to run a considerable amount of preload on the rear shock absorber to get a reasonable rate of turn from the bike. Running it in the standard, mid-position, makes for a slow turning bike that understeers in the bends and, paradoxically, is less stable in a straight line. So jack up the rear and get some more weight over the front wheel. It's notable that '08 onwards bikes have a slightly steeper steering head angle and shorter wheelbase for this very reason.

Having said all this, above all, just ride it. If it breaks it breaks. It's a machine and they sometimes go wrong. Enjoy it....:D
 
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