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Thank you for the response sir. Just to confirm though, you would recommend a change to w50 before a ride in 100+ temps?
 

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In you Hexhead you can also use Mobil-1 15W-50 avalaible at Walmart for $23 per 5 quart jug. Every year they run a $10 rebate (two per household) so you get a great oil for $13. I use it and change it at 5,000 mile intervals only because I have mutiple motorcycles and 5,000 mile intervals are easy to remember. If I only had one bike I'd have no problem letting it go the recommended 6,000 mile change interval or beyond.

You can spend more money but you don't have to.

2005 R1200GS
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2012 DR650
Wait. So to confirm, you’d recommend changing the oil to a w50 before a ride in temps over 100?

Thanks again!
 

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Wait. So to confirm, you’d recommend changing the oil to a w50 before a ride in temps over 100?

Thanks again!


I am not recommending you do anything other than what you are comfortable doing. Personally I use 15w-50 in my Hexhead GS's. I live and ride in Pennsylvania year round in temperatures from below zero to 100+.
 

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Thank you for the response sir. Just to confirm though, you would recommend a change to w50 before a ride in 100+ temps?
Here is a screenshot of my 2007 manual...likely same for your bike.
20200705_203917.jpg
 

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I had not realized that there were many who preferred to change the oil at half intervals, me and most of the guys I ride with would much rather oil change interval were extended as it never fails that you need to stop for an oil change midway during the course of a long trip.

I can complete an oil change for about $30 ($20 for a gallon of Rotella T6 and $10 for a Hiflo HF160 filter) but the oil usually still looks very clean at around 3,000 miles, in fact I think I have about 2,900 on the oil in my bike now I'll post a photo when I'm able.
I'm not preaching against changing the oil sooner than recommended but I do wonder if it does any good or even more harm than good as new oil filters take a second or two to refill on initial start-up after being changed, I always cringe when hitting the start button after an oil change knowing that I have zero oil pressure until the filter fills.

Hi Folks
New member i am. (said Yoda)
Have i been screwing up my oil changes then ?
I 've always pre-filled my oil filter with the chosen oil, before screwing it into place and obviously incorporate its volume into the total refill !
Lots to learn from you guys ( n gals)
( I can almost sense the responses brewing :geek: )
 

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Many say pre-filling is not needed. I do it as on my last oil change the engine made a hell of a clatter at first startup. I should have bumped the starter first (without starting) to help prime it a bit.

Based on how the filter mounts there is low chance of spilling so seems worth it to do. But won't destroy the engine if you don't.
 

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There is enough oil in the motor to protect it for a few seconds until oil filter fill and the system repressurize.

If it was an issue manufacturers would position the oil filter threads u like the boxer. I've had mutiple vehicles/motorcycles where the filter is on its side making it impossible to fill the filter prior to installation. Then there are cartridge filters like on my DR650, small block Moto Guzzi and several KTM's where you fit the filter element into the block then screw on the sealed cover .Again no way to put oil in unless you lay he bike on its side or in some instance flip it over. Even then the oil would most likely run out of the filter cavity before you got it sealed up and turned on.
 

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A lot of information in these oil threads and a bit exhausting sifting through for the one piece of info you are looking for so I will ask my questions straight up. I am riding a 2012 GS with ~10k miles. I live in Idaho and I'm a three season rider. I put on more paved miles than dirt. I enjoy gravel and despite many years riding dirt bikes, I stay away from single tracks and overly challenging off-road tracks on the GS. Having bought the bike with 4k after which I had the dealer go through everything including new fluids all around I've done one oil change on my own using BMW oil and filter. Planning to do a spring change and looking at the many choices for oil. I'm thinking full synthetic and my questions mostly concern viscosity and brand. FWIW, I am not looking for an oil to allow me to stretch out my service intervals as I plan to change at 4-6k regardless.

1. Viscosity - Because I don't plan on riding in cold weather, what is the reasoning behind a 5-?w viscosity? The 2012 is air/oil cooled, is there a reason that I shouldn't consider a 10w? or 15w? oil? I would think that the 15w would provide better lubrication when the engine is up to operating temps. By the same reasoning, on the high end, 50w would not thin out as quickly as 40w. The last thought on viscosity concerns the transmission. Seems like somewhere in these threads there was discussion about shifting and deterioration of same over time. Is there a benefit to the transmission in running a 15w50 over a 5w50?

2. Brand - There seems to be a lot of brand loyalty when it comes to oil, and most oils are probably fairly comparable. There are a couple that jump out and raise questions. First is Motorex BOXER 4T, SAE 15W/50. It claims to be formulated for air cooled boxers. Another is Bel Ray EXS Synthetic Ester 4T and the last is Bel Ray EXL Mineral 4T which is the only oil Bel Ray recommends when you use their online oil selector. Both of the Bel Ray choices are 10w-40 or 20w50.

Thanks for any information you can provide.
 

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A lot of information in these oil threads and a bit exhausting sifting through for the one piece of info you are looking for so I will ask my questions straight up. I am riding a 2012 GS with ~10k miles. I live in Idaho and I'm a three season rider. I put on more paved miles than dirt. I enjoy gravel and despite many years riding dirt bikes, I stay away from single tracks and overly challenging off-road tracks on the GS. Having bought the bike with 4k after which I had the dealer go through everything including new fluids all around I've done one oil change on my own using BMW oil and filter. Planning to do a spring change and looking at the many choices for oil. I'm thinking full synthetic and my questions mostly concern viscosity and brand. FWIW, I am not looking for an oil to allow me to stretch out my service intervals as I plan to change at 4-6k regardless.

1. Viscosity - Because I don't plan on riding in cold weather, what is the reasoning behind a 5-?w viscosity? The 2012 is air/oil cooled, is there a reason that I shouldn't consider a 10w? or 15w? oil? I would think that the 15w would provide better lubrication when the engine is up to operating temps. By the same reasoning, on the high end, 50w would not thin out as quickly as 40w. The last thought on viscosity concerns the transmission. Seems like somewhere in these threads there was discussion about shifting and deterioration of same over time. Is there a benefit to the transmission in running a 15w50 over a 5w50?

2. Brand - There seems to be a lot of brand loyalty when it comes to oil, and most oils are probably fairly comparable. There are a couple that jump out and raise questions. First is Motorex BOXER 4T, SAE 15W/50. It claims to be formulated for air cooled boxers. Another is Bel Ray EXS Synthetic Ester 4T and the last is Bel Ray EXL Mineral 4T which is the only oil Bel Ray recommends when you use their online oil selector. Both of the Bel Ray choices are 10w-40 or 20w50.

Thanks for any information you can provide.
From the 2012 rider manual. Follow it for viscosity. With a dry clutch and seperate transmission gear oil a non-motorcycle oil can be used. At a 4-6000 mile interval any synthetic (or semi-syn) will be fine.
20210219_185128.jpg
 

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Does somebody knows a 'correct' way to have the starter turns the motor without spark nor injection to fill the lubrication circuit after a change ?

By correct, I mean a way to tell the ECU to not fire, not inject.

If there is no such thing, what about unplugging the starter relay wire and run the starter with a jumper wire, with the ignition OFF, ECU won't even know that the motor is turning.
 

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Would putting bike into 6th gear and moving the rear wheel, cycle the cylinders and get the oil moving?


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Would putting bike into 6th gear and moving the rear wheel, cycle the cylinders and get the oil moving?


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I thought of that too, but you'd be fighting compression. Easiest is a quick bump of starter, if it fires off probably no biggie.

I've heard of guys bumping the starter to get all the old oil out, after draining, I think that's a bit too much. While there would be some oil film if it fired off not worth the risk IMO.
 

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From the 2012 rider manual. Follow it for viscosity. With a dry clutch and seperate transmission gear oil a non-motorcycle oil can be used. At a 4-6000 mile interval any synthetic (or semi-syn) will be fine.
View attachment 29144
Thanks for the feedback Krons. I've always been suspicious of multi-vis that has such a wide range like 5-50. Seems that that covers them for all operating temps, but if I am not operating near of below freezing I don't see the reasoning. It's interesting that BMW seems to lean toward 5-50.
 

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Thanks for the feedback Krons. I've always been suspicious of multi-vis that has such a wide range like 5-50. Seems that that covers them for all operating temps, but if I am not operating near of below freezing I don't see the reasoning. It's interesting that BMW seems to lean toward 5-50.
As a dealer it is easy...new bikes need 5w on the low end...old (oil cooled like your) bikes need 50 on warm end so stocking 5w50 covers them all, although 20w50 is the official recommendation in your manual.

I agree spanning that range is tough for an oil. If the bike is garaged 20w50 is fine riding above freezing, I just let mine warm up a bit before getting on the throttle hard. Last winter I ran 10w40 in my 2007 but switched to 20w50 when the June temps started hitting 80°F + as I was close to a change anyway.
 

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As a dealer it is easy...new bikes need 5w on the low end...old (oil cooled like your) bikes need 50 on warm end so stocking 5w50 covers them all, although 20w50 is the official recommendation in your manual.

I agree spanning that range is tough for an oil. If the bike is garaged 20w50 is fine riding above freezing, I just let mine warm up a bit before getting on the throttle hard. Last winter I ran 10w40 in my 2007 but switched to 20w50 when the June temps started hitting 80°F + as I was close to a change anyway.
Any thoughts good or bad on Motorex Boxer 4T 15w50?
 

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