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Here's my 2 cents on auxiliary lights, you get what you pay for. On my 2017 GS I spent the money on the Denali Mounting bracket and EzCan but purchased some cheap Creed lights off Amazon, they served there purpose as far as being seen but at night I just didn't see a whole lot of increased visibility, especially with the high beams LED headlights on.
I found that to be true also with most of the inexpensive auxiliary lights because they seem to have a reflector design made for a flood pattern. And, comparing lumen ratings alone isn't terribly informative without understanding the reflector design for spot vs flood pattern of light. You get a lot of extra light all around in front of the bike but they don't project much light far down the road. That's when I went on a search for something that would be comparable in performance to Clearwater Krista (spot pattern) or Erica (flood pattern) lights. The links I provided above are to lights that I believe do that. The Ericas are 6,000+ lumen floods, 3.7" round and cost $980. The Kristas are 3000+ lumen spots in the same form factor that throw an 8 degree pencil beam far down the road and cost $780. If you put a pair of both of those lights on your bike you would spend something in the neighborhood of $1,760 for about 9000+ lumens of combination spot and flood light. The solution I linked to above provides a combination spot and flood pattern throwing 18,800 lumens of light (12,800 lumens of flood, 6,000 lumens of spot) with CANBUS integration for about $260.

There's a few quirks I've noted above and I've only had them on the bike for a few months so I'll follow up in, say, a year from now and let you guys all know if they've held up well.

I also feel like I have to say this when I'm posting about these cheap lights - that is that I'm not at all trying to throw any shade on Clearwater or any of the premium light brands. Everything I know about these products is that they are excellent and impeccably supported by their respective companies. There is story after story on just about any motorcycle forum about how these companies delighted their customers. My goal was something different. I set out to see just how cheaply I could throw some real game changing light down the road without concern for product support. What I've posted above is the result of that search. If product support is important to you then I think you would be very well supported by any of those companies.
 

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It's worth bearing in mind that most (all?)of the cheap light brands will simply pick a figure for output...."let's say this one has 10,000 lumens" and paste it on the box whereas the more expensive brands are far more honest with their outputs. Plus they put a lot of effort into having the light go where it works best. I see a lot of led lights on vehicles down here in Australia that put out a massive amount of light, but close to the vehicle. It initially looks impressive until you realise that so much light close up simply closes your eyes down and effectively destroys your long distance vision (which isn't lit anyway). A few of the cheaper brands are coming out with decent lights now but that excludes anything under 3 or 400 dollars.
 

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This video is remarkable appropriate as it tests some cheap Amazon lights very similar to those mentioned above against the lowest output Baja lights, the Squadron Sport. The Amazon lights claim 6,000 lumens, the BD lights are a claimed 3,150 lumens and are a lot brighter. I use the next level Baja Squadron Pro lights which are a claimed 4,900 lumens and they are genuinely bright and far reaching. I have a 2021 1250 Rallye GS and these lights make the stock led headlight somewhat insignificant.
 

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It's worth bearing in mind that most (all?)of the cheap light brands will simply pick a figure for output...."let's say this one has 10,000 lumens" and paste it on the box whereas the more expensive brands are far more honest with their outputs. Plus they put a lot of effort into having the light go where it works best. I see a lot of led lights on vehicles down here in Australia that put out a massive amount of light, but close to the vehicle. It initially looks impressive until you realise that so much light close up simply closes your eyes down and effectively destroys your long distance vision (which isn't lit anyway). A few of the cheaper brands are coming out with decent lights now but that excludes anything under 3 or 400 dollars.
I went in to my evaluation with that assumption - that a lumen claim was pretty useless in determining performance. The reflector design and how it is tuned to the LEDs used seems to be really important in what kind of performance you get out of any light. I'm sure the premium brands have spent a lot of R&D on getting that just right for the type of light they're selling (spot vs. flood) and that the enclosures and lenses are good quality construction. I was prepared to conclude that there were no really cheap options that could approximate the performance of these premium products. I went through a few different iterations of cheap lights that did exactly what these videos show - that there's a lot of bright light projected in a wide flood pattern but very little penetration into the darkness at a distance. But hey, they're really inexpensive so my failed experiments went into the trash or a box of misfit toys. The lights in the links I posted, particularly the spots, have exceptional distance penetration lighting up a black hole of a road for several hundred yards ahead and mounted up very easily to my Altrider protection bars.

I wasn't too concerned about wasting $100 trying multiple different cheap lights on the chance that I'd find something that worked well. It just didn't make sense to me, given the mature commodity nature of high performing LED components; and, how easy it should be to copy effective reflector designs that high performance lighting should cost several hundred to over a thousand dollars. And here's the main point, even the worst of the cheap Chinese lights that ended up in the misfit box are excellent choices for making you more conspicuous. If you don't ride a lot at night and your main goal for your accessory lights is to make yourself more visible day or night, then I'm very confident that there's no reason to spend more than about $20 on a pair of lights plus whatever you decide on CANBUS integration or simple relay/switch.
 
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I always get led spots vs floods...at speed the floods won't throw the light the distance needed and way more likely to blind oncoming traffic.

Definitely agree the lumen claims on any of the cheapies are a guide at best. Still great value IMO.
 

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And if you want to forgo the $260 CANBUS integration and just have lights that are on/off a

$2.81 30z fused relay
$1.66 for a Posi-TAP tee (to connect trigger wire to existing keyed power wire)
$2.99 for a duckbill switch
$0.50 for several 12v spade connectors
$5.00 in 16ga wire (red/black/yellow)
$2.00 in 1/4" shrink tube
$12.00 in cold beer and an hour of time

You can roll your own harness or buy a pre rolled harness from Amazon for $10.00 and cut it down to size.


Product Rectangle Font Schematic Slope
 

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Lot of good opinions here. My personal experience has been that the inexpensive Chinese LEDs are conspicuity lights at best and just didn't have the power I was expecting to augment the miserable OEM headlight on my 2012 GS. I just haven't had good luck with them.

Last summer, I purchased a pair of RubyMoto lights after the MOA national in Montana. They were half the cost of the "big names" and show commendable quality of materials and construction. I'm cheap and don't regret the purchase.

JohnD
 

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I wouldn't discard chinese led's so easily. 2 of my previous bikes were Suzuki VStrom DL1000. One was 2014 and the other one 2017. On both I replaced OEM halogen bulbs in low and high beam, both H7. I used chinese zDatt brand (as suggested by a friend) and they gave superb and sharp output, much better then halogen bulbs. I had more light on the road and oncoming drivers have never flashed me. Besides that, none of them have ever failed.
 

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Yes, right into the bike's harness.
My 2021 GS doesn't need Chinese led's but few months ago I installed a pair of those zDatt led's in my friend's GS 2006. We just had to lower the beam a lot. He later went to one tire shop to align the beam on the focus check equipment. Anyway, he has fully farkled GS but he said the best thing ever on his bike were those LED's.
So yes, they plug into the OEM harness and use projecting mirror from halogen bulb.
 

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The problem most often encountered in replacing an incandescent bulb (like an H4 or H6) with an LED is the resulting relationship with the reflector. If the LED emits light from a different position relative to the reflector then the result can be pretty bad. Some of those replacement LEDs look really bright but the first time you're caught out at night you realize that they are really bad at actually throwing light down the road. I ran in to this problem on my KLR. I replaced the light bulb to get back some watts to use for heated clothes (low output stator on that bike) but was ultimately unsatisfied with the result.

The spots that I found on ebay (linked above) really throw a lot of light far down the road. You can't just look at lumen ratings and need to find lights that advertise the product as spot beam pattern lights as well.
 

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I've been happy with my $30 LED Sideshooter 3" Cubes mounted on a lightbar. Not only do they illuminate the road ahead the "sideshooter" lights up the sides foir an almost 140 degree cast of light.


All in to include lights $40, light bar $52, harness/switch $12 and posi-tap $4 or about $120.

View attachment 31442
I have a question. Have any of you experienced the differences on mounting orientation of these Amazon LED lights in general, i.e. up-side-down or right-side-up in regarding of the bracket (or the brand label) of these light? Would they create more glare to coming traffic if they were mounted the "wrong" way? Thank you.
 

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I have a question. Have any of you experienced the differences on mounting orientation of these Amazon LED lights in general, i.e. up-side-down or right-side-up in regarding of the bracket (or the brand label) of these light? Would they create more glare to coming traffic if they were mounted the "wrong" way? Thank you.
I have not but have always gotten spot leds so the beams have been pretty focused with good cutoff. My DR650 are leds are mounted sideways, the GSA upside down.

Floods will be a different story.
 

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I could not even begin to tell you if I have flood or spots with the "sideshooters" but in the several instances I have used them they are mounted on the underside of the lightbar and focused forward and outward.

Honestly I do not care what the car in front of me (either following or oncoming) is seeing as long as the road is illuminated and I am not blinding them, I'm good.
 

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The spots that I found on ebay (linked above) really throw a lot of light far down the road. You can't just look at lumen ratings and need to find lights that advertise the product as spot beam pattern lights as well.
So, did you use those LED spots on the KLR? I've avoided auxiliary lighting on my KLR due to the low alternator output you mentioned.
 

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So, did you use those LED spots on the KLR? I've avoided auxiliary lighting on my KLR due to the low alternator output you mentioned.
Leds don't pull a lot of power, I wouldn't be afraid to put them on your KLR.

Here is what I put on my DR650:
AUTOSAVER88 2PACK 12W LED Spot POD Race Lights Off Road Motorcycle Dirt Bike Fog Driving Work Lights 1200LM IP68 Waterproof https://smile.amazon.com/dp/B01N3YR0AE
 

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So, did you use those LED spots on the KLR? I've avoided auxiliary lighting on my KLR due to the low alternator output you mentioned.
I didn't and moved that bike along to it's next adventurer before solving that problem. If I still had the bike today I wouldn't hesitate to put those floods on the bike (about 3A draw). The spots I linked to in this thread are much more powerful and draw a bit over 9A at full power. I'm not sure I would have done that and ran my heated gear on the KLR but your situation may vary depending on what else you're running.

EDIT: I just looked at the lights that Krons posted a link to and they require much less power (12W per light) than the spots I indicated (60W per light).
 
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