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I am considering aluminum panniers. Most manufactures have a low exhaust pipe option. Is there an advantage/disadvantage to lowering the pipe?

Thanks
 

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One of the first things I did when I got my 12GS was to lower the muffler so I could get full-size bags on. Never had a problem, although I never did really deep water crossings.

Even with the pipe lowered, the water would have to be very deep, and I think water ingress while the engine is running is very unlikely anyway.

$ .02 :D
 

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A buddy just e-mailed to inquire where I'd gotten the muffler lowering kits for my for my GSA. Seems he didn't lower his silencer when he mounted his new panniers and, on a trip, it got so hot inside the left box that the cork blew out of his single malt scotch.:D

Mike
apology for making this thread up. oh! :p had a same happened to me as yours mate! a man ask me for where should i got the muffler lowering kit.but the funny thing is i didn't even post any thread or something.:cool: are you answered to his mail? just confused. :rolleyes:
 

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apology for making this thread up. oh! :p had a same happened to me as yours mate! a man ask me for where should i got the muffler lowering kit.but the funny thing is i didn't even post any thread or something.:cool: are you answered to his mail? just confused. :rolleyes:

No, I didn't know about your friend and his "hot toddy" problem. My friend lowered his muffler but, just in case, he keeps his hooch in the right bag!:D He isn't taking any chances.

Mike
 

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Even with the muffler fully submerged, water can't get in unless you stall.
I've heard of cases where water pressure has caused an idling engine to stall, and the general advice is to make sure you keep the revs up a little.

I believe another potential downside of lowering the exhaust is that the reduced clearance that might affect off-road capability.
 

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I've heard of cases where water pressure has caused an idling engine to stall, and the general advice is to make sure you keep the revs up a little.

I believe another potential downside of lowering the exhaust is that the reduced clearance that might affect off-road capability.
It clearly does reduce off road capacity. The sole reason the muffler is high on off road bikes is to allow long travel suspension to do its job without slamming the muffler against things. Imho, lowering the pipe is absolutely fine if your off roading is limited to gravel country roads. Luggage capacity can be greatly increased. If you plan to actually do any serious back country work with it, its not a good idea. There is a company that builds a set of stacked twin pipes up high that seems to offer the best of both worlds. Another member here has emailed them for details and hopefully will be reporting back soon.

http://www.hattech.de/bmw_r1200GS_GSA_doublefire_1.html

See comments in this thread:

http://www.r1200gs.info/forum/showthread.php?t=3888

Ken
 

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It clearly does reduce off road capacity. The sole reason the muffler is high on off road bikes is to allow long travel suspension to do its job without slamming the muffler against things. Imho, lowering the pipe is absolutely fine if your off roading is limited to gravel country roads. Luggage capacity can be greatly increased. If you plan to actually do any serious back country work with it, its not a good idea.
Ken
Sorry Ken, but I have to respectfully disagree. Perhaps if you're talking about a 'Dakar' level competitive bike, this may be valid, but the lowered pipe mod I did to my 12GS never presented a problem, even in deep sand and heavily rutted trails. Even when the bike wound up "resting" on its left side a number of times, the muffler did not contact anything, and the bike was sold @ 45,000 km with absolutely no damage at all to the original muffler. The new owner is also an off-roader, and reports no ongoing problems.

The mod was basically an appropriately sized 15 degree adapter where the muffler joined (a different clamp may be necessary), and an extended (or in my case, because of the system cases, a dogleg) hanger. Also, because my bike was a 2005, I had to modify the centerstand stop. The beauty of this setup was that it was easily reversible should any future owner want to return to the stock or other setup. I would recommend this to anyone.

Oh yeah, I never "cooked" anything in my luggage either... ;)

JP
 

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Sorry Ken, but I have to respectfully disagree. Perhaps if you're talking about a 'Dakar' level competitive bike, this may be valid, but the lowered pipe mod I did to my 12GS never presented a problem, even in deep sand and heavily rutted trails. Even when the bike wound up "resting" on its left side a number of times, the muffler did not contact anything, and the bike was sold @ 45,000 km with absolutely no damage at all to the original muffler. The new owner is also an off-roader, and reports no ongoing problems.
Oh yeah, I never "cooked" anything in my luggage either... ;)
JP
JP,
I couldn't agree more with your assessment. I lowered my muffler reluctantly and my concerns were completely unfounded.






If you're nervous about water crossings (and I've never had problems with that), stay on the caprock!

Mike
 

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I'm not concerned at all with off-roading a lowered muffler. I don't take the GS on that kind of tight trail where it might be a problem. But I find it butt ugly and I ride mostly with the side cases off. Therefore I try to avoid it.
 

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I'm not concerned at all with off-roading a lowered muffler. I don't take the GS on that kind of tight trail where it might be a problem. But I find it butt ugly and I ride mostly with the side cases off. Therefore I try to avoid it.


Cug,

You're right: it is butt ugly! So's the bike.:D As you stated, I don't get too aggressive with the GSA, either. A spill in a remote part of Big Bend taught me that. The very functional bags help hide the lowered pipe.

Mike
 

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Sorry Ken, but I have to respectfully disagree. Perhaps if you're talking about a 'Dakar' level competitive bike, this may be valid, but the lowered pipe mod I did to my 12GS never presented a problem, even in deep sand and heavily rutted trails. Even when the bike wound up "resting" on its left side a number of times, the muffler did not contact anything, and the bike was sold @ 45,000 km with absolutely no damage at all to the original muffler. The new owner is also an off-roader, and reports no ongoing problems.

The mod was basically an appropriately sized 15 degree adapter where the muffler joined (a different clamp may be necessary), and an extended (or in my case, because of the system cases, a dogleg) hanger. Also, because my bike was a 2005, I had to modify the centerstand stop. The beauty of this setup was that it was easily reversible should any future owner want to return to the stock or other setup. I would recommend this to anyone.

Oh yeah, I never "cooked" anything in my luggage either... ;)

JP
Wow, I guess I stand corrected. My comments come from observation, and not personal experience never having lowered a GS muffler myself, hence the "IMHO" caviat. Just making the observation that if it didn't need to be higher for off road use, the manufacturers would have no reason to do it and complicate luggage storage. Think Honda Scrambler.

That said, I am impressed at the success you had off road with it down that low. Amazing!

Then of course, there's the issue of looks but seeing your photos wth the dog legged bracket, I'm warming up to the idea:)
 

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I was partial not to lower the muffer, but I now I am having second thoughts. I wasn't so much concerned about water but about the possibility of the muffer getting hit by rocks, but after looking at some pictures I have realized that is not getting that much lower, and I think the practical benefits far outweight the "aesthetic" issue.

I don't want to have a left saddle sticking out, nor I want to compromise capacity. Planning to go down to Italy and Spain for the summer, overheating of the bag will definitely be an added issue.

If I can find a pretty bag and a lowering kit I will go for it for sure, so unless there is a major technical issue I've overseen, this is where my money is going.
 

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If I can find a pretty bag and a lowering kit I will go for it for sure, so unless there is a major technical issue I've overseen, this is where my money is going.
Mark,

There are plenty of fine panniers out there. I chose the Jesse Odyssey II and they recommended, of course, their lowering kit. I liked the one-stop shopping and have been quite satisfied.


Hope this helps.

Mike
 

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IMO your lowered pipe looks nice. I would do it to mine if I were buying new luggage.
There has been a styling trend to point mufflers up at a steep angle. I think the Euro brands started this, they even do this on their street bikes now. I remember talking with David Robb at the BMW rally in Morgantown NC. Looking at a K1200RS I asked "why is the muffler positioned to point up, which dictates using a small left luggage bag?" He said it "gives the motorcycle a more sporting design which is important to european buyers."
 

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the only reason i am holding off on lowering the exhaust: cant hang stuff below the panniers like the sleeping bag or the camping mattress (which take up much more than the 8 liters you lose due to a notched pannier.
 

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Anyone done a lowered pipe and two right-hand Vario cases?

Has anyone done the lowered pipe and used a second right-hand Vario case for the left side?

I'm impressed with the look of the lowered pipe. I like Bullwinkle's idea that the modification can be put back to stock if necessary. That could be done for rides where water crossings might be a concern. I'm using SKB 44 liter cases (think Pelican) on a Givi rack for backcountry camping. Although the left side sticks out, I've got a ton of space, they're waterproof, and only cost $100 to replace if they get damaged in a spill but also give good protection for the bike in that scenario.

I prefer the Varios for around town or road-only trip, especially because of they're expandability. However, like most, I find the chopped left Vario case to be seriously space compromised. Considering I already have to spend about 30 minutes swapping the racks around to prepare for a back country trip, another 30 minutes to swap the muffler back to stock configuration would not be that a big deal.
 
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