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Discussion Starter #1
Good Day everybody.

I'm Diaan, I live in Durban, South Africa. A Helicopter pilot by profession. I ride a 310R and a 2007 R1200GS.

I was involved in a small prang that left my GS in need of repairs. Nothing too serious, bent front shock and the pillion footrest needed re-welding. I removed the entire rear frame and front shocks. The engine was in perfect running order after the accident. The airbox was removed and the injectors covered to keep debris out.

For various reasons, the bike stood like this for almost a year and a half. Eventually, everything has been fixed and I'm reassembling the bike.

Here's the question: Following an extended period of not running, what is the best way to get this motor running again? What maintenance tasks should I complete before cranking it up with the expectation of going on a test ride around the block?

I'm thinking oil change service at least. I'm also wondering if it would be worth it to remove the plugs and crank the starter ( or turn the shaft ) to ensure things are turning without the added stress of combustion.

Your advice is eagarly awaited.

Regards,

Diaan
 

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I wouldn't worry about it. A year and half isn't that long if the bike was stored properly. You could always start it up on the main stand and run through the gears before going out on the road.
 

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There is plenty of oil film on the engine internals to provide protection until the oil pump re-primes (about 2 seconds) and the motor is getting new oil everywhere it needs.

Top up the gas oil battery charge/ Check the tire pressure and ride.
 

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I live in north Texas where winter storage it not an issue/required. However, as motocross, cross country, and trials rider I've spent many hours on the KTMTalk forum where this subject is a common topic of discussion among riders in the northern states and Canada.

Before Starting:

Before even touching the bike check the ground underneath it for any signs of fluid leaks or seepage. Find the source and fix any if found.

If the bike has been stored using the side stand, roll the bike 1/4 to 1/2 of a wheel revolution and over-inflate tires by 20-30%. This will eliminate any flat spots that have developed and should be done at least 24 hours before your first ride. Note the new tire pressure of each wheel. De-inflate the tires back to their proper pressure before your first ride but, before doing so, check the overinflated pressure once more and compare those readings to your notes taken previously to insure both tires are holding pressure and that you don't have any slow leaks.

Most remove the spark plug(s) and put a few drops of motor oil in the cylinder(s). Cover the spark plug hole(s) with a rag. Put the bike 2nd gear and, with rear wheel off the ground, rotate the rear tire by hand for a couple of minutes to help re-lubricate the dry rings and cylinder walls. (Obviously motor oil works better on bikes with vertically oriented cylinders. A liberal squirt of fogging oil through the spark plug holes would probably be more effective in our boxers)

Check the plugs and reinstall or replace as needed.

With the both wheels back on the ground, put the bike in 2nd or 3rd gear, and with the clutch engaged (lever out), rock the bike back and forth a several times. Long periods of storage can cause clutch plates to stick together. This will free them. With the bike still in gear, pull in your clutch lever and roll the bike forward. It should roll as easily as if in neutral - if not repeat first steps and keeping rocking it back and forth until it rolls freely in gear with the clutch lever pulled in.

Rotate the throttle to fully open and release to check that snaps back to fully the closed position. Repeat several times to confirm proper operation.

Open the airbox. Check it, the filter, and snorkels. Remove any cobwebs, bugs of other critters that may have taken up residence (you may be surprised at what you find!). Clean or replace air filter as needed.

Check the coolant level and top it up if necessary.

At a bare minimum, give your rotors, calipers and brake pads a generous blast of brake cleaner. If the brake fluid is over two years old, replacing it will help insure maximum and consistent brake performance.

If you used a good fuel stabilizer prior to storage topping the tank up with fresh fuel should be sufficient. However, draining the tank completely and refilling with fresh fuel would be optimal.

Starting & Riding:

Upon starting the motor let it come back to life gently - idling for 5 minutes or so without touching the throttle. Use this time to check for any leaks and visually confirm proper operation of the turn signals, headlight and brake light for proper operation.

Find a nearby sparsely traveled road for a test ride to confirm the brakes and ABS are working properly at a safe, moderate speed - test the front and rear individually and both collectively.

This is probably not an issue for you in South Africa but if the bike's been subjected to above and below freezing temperatures while stored it's highly likely there's water from condensation sitting atop the engine's oil. Riding the bike for at least 30 minutes after it's reach its normal operating temperature will insure any water in your motor is turned into steam and vented out your motor.

Good luck!
 
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