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Toklat
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Anybody know the correct air pressure for this tire? The Anakee 3’s were 36 front 42 rear for my GS. Is it the same for the adventure or different. My OEM dealer put 32 front and 36 rear so I’m confused I couldn’t find anything on the Michelin web site. Any help would be appreciated even an opinion would help. Thanks.
 

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Recommended pressures are related to the bike and not the tires. For my '17 R1200GSA - it's 36.3psi Front / 42.1psi rear. Plus/minus 1 or 2 psi is not a big deal and within accuracies of most gages and your Tire Pressure Monitoring System. Depending on tire heat up, you may even inflate a little lower, so that as they heat up - they stay close the 36/42 thing. Going off-road, some go as low as 25/25 Front and rear - it's all a preference. Your manual and a sticker under the rear pillion seat should have the tire pressure specs.
 

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2019 R1250 GSA
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Since the Anakee Adventure was installed from the factory on some 2019 GSA's, it follows the BMW (owners manual) recommended 36 front and 42 rear. That's what I used when I ran a set of Adventures.
 
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Does anyone actually know how the manufacturer determines the one-size-fits-all air pressure recommendation?

Does it make sense that the recommended pressure would be for the max load for the tires? They don't tell you to exceed that if you're really heavily loaded so it must be, right? What if you are riding substantially under the max weight? Is that still the best pressure to run in your tires?

I've run TKC80s and Michelin Wilds in the low 20's psi to get better traction off-road - never bent a rim or had a tire problem. On the road I run my Michelin Wilds that I have now at 34F, 36R. I get really good cornering traction on the pavement as well as pretty decent even wear.
 

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Does anyone actually know how the manufacturer determines the one-size-fits-all air pressure recommendation?

Does it make sense that the recommended pressure would be for the max load for the tires? They don't tell you to exceed that if you're really heavily loaded so it must be, right? What if you are riding substantially under the max weight? Is that still the best pressure to run in your tires?

I've run TKC80s and Michelin Wilds in the low 20's psi to get better traction off-road - never bent a rim or had a tire problem. On the road I run my Michelin Wilds that I have now at 34F, 36R. I get really good cornering traction on the pavement as well as pretty decent even wear.
I agree the recommended tire pressure is for maximum loads. I run my 80/20 tires at 36F and 38R unless I load it up.
 

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2019 R1250 GSA
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I've run TKC80s and Michelin Wilds in the low 20's psi to get better traction off-road - never bent a rim or had a tire problem. On the road I run my Michelin Wilds that I have now at 34F, 36R. I get really good cornering traction on the pavement as well as pretty decent even wear.
I run my Michelin Wilds at 36 front and rear because that is the rated pressure for the max load on that tire. They say you don’t have to air down the Wild because it is a radial tire.
 

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I run my Michelin Wilds at 36 front and rear because that is the rated pressure for the max load on that tire. They say you don’t have to air down the Wild because it is a radial tire.
Hmmm, that's interesting and I didn't know that was a recommendation. My experience is that there is some significant improvement in traction in muddy and other soft terrain riding when the tires are aired down and I carry a compressor to air them back up if I know I'm going on and off road on a multi-day ride.

I'm wondering what the rationale is for them being radial tires vis a vis soft terrain traction?
 

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2019 R1250 GSA
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Hmmm, that's interesting and I didn't know that was a recommendation. My experience is that there is some significant improvement in traction in muddy and other soft terrain riding when the tires are aired down and I carry a compressor to air them back up if I know I'm going on and off road on a multi-day ride.

I'm wondering what the rationale is for them being radial tires vis a vis soft terrain traction?
I just installed the Wilds. Because the tire's max load is at 36 psi and my dealership inflated them to 42 psi, I did an exhaustive search to find out at what pressure I should run. I found that folks ran pressures that are all over the map. Like you, some folks ran them (off-road) in the 20 psi range. Some in the low 30's. Several folks made the comment that the Wilds didn't need to be aired down because it is a radial and a radial sidewall is more flexible hence it can conform to changes in the terrain. I too believe airing down has it's benefits, I'm only sharing what I found about this tire.
 
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I think the jury is out as to whether it's better or not to air down your tires. I personally never aire down any of my off road tires. Mitas EO7s I kept at 36 & 42 psi and Battleaxe Adventurecross I kept at 35 psi. I fear the bent rims more then anything.
 

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I just installed the Wilds. Because the tire's max load is at 36 psi and my dealership inflated them to 42 psi, I did an exhaustive search to find out at what pressure I should run. I found that folks ran pressures that are all over the map. Like you, some folks ran them (off-road) in the 20 psi range. Some in the low 30's. Several folks made the comment that the Wilds didn't need to be aired down because it is a radial and a radial sidewall is more flexible hence it can conform to changes in the terrain. I too believe airing down has it's benefits, I'm only sharing what I found about this tire.
Anybody ask the tire manufacturer or BMW NA? I have not asked about the Wilds, but I have asked manufacturers’ representatives (Dunlop, for Roadsmart IIIs, Metzler, for Z8s and Michelin, for Anakee Adventures), about pressures loaded and unloaded, for my K1600 and loaded, unloaded and off road for my GS. The answers have been universal. For riding on road riding on paved roads, inflate as per the motorcycle manufacturer’s instruction-both bikes. BMW specifies that the correct pressures for the K and the GS are, respectively, 42/42 and 36/42, cold, at ambient temp of 68F. Tires will heat up and pressures will rise accordingly. Do not chase these variations in pressures. Inflate to the specified pressures when tires are cold. These specifications are a compromise between traction on the one hand and tire wear, both with respect to overall life of the tires and maintaining profile. On a track or when traction is the only consideration short term, reduce pressures a few psi. Tires will wear faster and unevenly in exchange for the best traction. Over time, the lack of profile and tread will reduce traction.
For riding the GS off road, the rep who I asked stated that reducing pressures a few pounds will provide better traction without excessive wear or loss of profile of the tires. When the ride returns to pavement, reinflate to manufacturer’s specifications for on road riding.
 

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Anybody ask the tire manufacturer or BMW NA? I have not asked about the Wilds, but I have asked manufacturers’ representatives (Dunlop, for Roadsmart IIIs, Metzler, for Z8s and Michelin, for Anakee Adventures), about pressures loaded and unloaded, for my K1600 and loaded, unloaded and off road for my GS. The answers have been universal. For riding on road riding on paved roads, inflate as per the motorcycle manufacturer’s instruction-both bikes. BMW specifies that the correct pressures for the K and the GS are, respectively, 42/42 and 36/42, cold, at ambient temp of 68F. Tires will heat up and pressures will rise accordingly. Do not chase these variations in pressures. Inflate to the specified pressures when tires are cold. These specifications are a compromise between traction on the one hand and tire wear, both with respect to overall life of the tires and maintaining profile. On a track or when traction is the only consideration short term, reduce pressures a few psi. Tires will wear faster and unevenly in exchange for the best traction. Over time, the lack of profile and tread will reduce traction.
For riding the GS off road, the rep who I asked stated that reducing pressures a few pounds will provide better traction without excessive wear or loss of profile of the tires. When the ride returns to pavement, reinflate to manufacturer’s specifications for on road riding.

Can we agree there is a range of weights at which your motorcycle may operate? That should be a yes for everyone.

Can we agree that there is a proper tire inflation that depends on the weight you're tires are carrying? If your answer is no, then read no further because you're going to disagree with what I'm about to say.

Running the factory recommended pressure on a lightly loaded bike is not going to get the proper profile of the tire and it's going to wear out faster in the middle due to over inflation. This has always seemed intuitively correct to me and I've realized the truth of it in many 10's of thousands of miles on many different bikes. So it's my experience, as a 190lb rider on a lightly loaded bike, that running lower pressures on the street will increase tire life and allow the tire to perform the way it was intended.

However, I'll concede that if you run pressures so low that the tire profile is not maintained, then more heat will build up in the tire. That can be good or bad. As LAS pointed out running a pressure low enough to create more contact patch and heat will create more grip - up to a point. If there's too much heat getting in to a tire that is being pushed hard at the track then at some point it'll get greasy. And, with all that heat in the tire at a low pressure that alters the profile of the tire, it'll wear faster as well.

So the trick is to find the right pressure for your weight and I did that through trial and error on my K1600GT (long distance touring), my S1000RR (both street and track use), and my KTM 1290R hooligan bike. On my 1600, 36/36 would give me the best traction but with slightly faster wear and 38/38 would give me the best wear - way better than running 42/42 as recommended. On my GS, I'm running 34/36 unless I really load it up with all my epic adventuring gear, then I run the tires at 36/38 and I get better than average tire life out of my TKC80s or Wilds in a mix of paved, unpaved riding.

My S1000RR running Dunlop Q3s after a few track sessions showing the proper amount of heat/inflation in the tire for track day loops:


That's the rear running 29 psi. On the street I ran them at 32/34 for better tire life and still acceptable grip. The recommended pressures from the factory for that bike are 36/42 which I guess is what you'd want if you were a 300lb rider.
 
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Riding a rear tire for the last 4000 miles (in combination with Bridgestone AX41 and Mitas e07+ front).

Road: tried 34 to 42 and settled on 40.
Off-road: 28/29 works well.

I initially thought that the tire was too much of a trade off on the road compared with the 90/10s (eg Metzeler Tourance Next) with little gain off-road (I switched from the Bridgestone AX41), but after riding quite a bit of muddy roads and water crossings, I’d say that the tire beats the 90/10s traction by quite a large margin.
‘Need to take it slow, keep momentum and a good line though - throttle through soft stuff is not an option...
Dry grip on road is a bit uninspiring compared with 90/10s and good sport touring tires, but (as all Michelin’s) they shine in the rain.


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
 

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2019 R1250 GSA
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Ok..what does the BMW off-road Academy run their bikes tire pressures at..?
I can't comment on the BMW Off-Road Academy, but during my recent CA RawHyde Class, I checked the TPM of the 2019 R1250 GSA that I rented and they were running 30F and 30R on the Mitas tires they use.
 

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I can't comment on the BMW Off-Road Academy, but during my recent CA RawHyde Class, I checked the TPM of the 2019 R1250 GSA that I rented and they were running 30F and 30R on the Mitas tires they use.
I was told 36/42 on TKC 80's. An instructor said you don't need to air them down, but didn't mention you shouldn't.
 

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Riding a rear tire for the last 4000 miles (in combination with Bridgestone AX41 and Mitas e07+ front).

Road: tried 34 to 42 and settled on 40.
Off-road: 28/29 works well.

I initially thought that the tire was too much of a trade off on the road compared with the 90/10s (eg Metzeler Tourance Next) with little gain off-road (I switched from the Bridgestone AX41), but after riding quite a bit of muddy roads and water crossings, I’d say that the tire beats the 90/10s traction by quite a large margin.
‘Need to take it slow, keep momentum and a good line though - throttle through soft stuff is not an option...
Dry grip on road is a bit uninspiring compared with 90/10s and good sport touring tires, but (as all Michelin’s) they shine in the rain.


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk


Short update: tire lasted 6000 miles and performed well on and off-road to the end - attached a pic from last weekend snow covered forest roads in the
Pennsylvania mountains


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
 
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