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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Wheel Tire Vehicle Automotive fuel system Fuel tank


Got a Harbor Freight lift table from a buddy who is getting out of motorcycles. I'll put my Baxley sport chock on it for future use. The HF front vise is pitiful. This will come iin handy.
 

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Report back in a few weeks and let us know what you think using a lift vs not.

My lifts followed by a tire machine have been the best investments i have made when it comes to motorcycling. I'm now at the point where i do not even bend over to check oil levels or tire pressure. I put the bike on the live, raise it up then check.

Loves me some MC lift/table! makes things so much easier.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
I've got to get a better chock, and one of those small scissor lifts to be able to have front in chock and raise the rear to put on center stand. The tire machine has been an awesome purchase. It and the Marc Parnes balancer have given me complete freedom and effortless tire changes. The Parnes balancer is amazing, and fun to use. It is incredibly sensitive. In the end, you do it all, without killing yourself, and it is done perfectly, which makes me smile. I like working on the bikes, almost as much as riding them. Almost!
 

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Hope some of the following will help:

Wheel vise vs chock

1. I had a Baxley sport chock bolted to the front of my HF lift and it was great for bikes with 17" 120 series tires. Puch it in and forget it. No need to tie-down. Any wheel/tire bigger or smaller the bike needed to be secured with a couple of straps.
2. My new lift has a wheel vise and while not a convenient as a wheel chock it fits a variety of wheels better and no hump to roll the bike in/out of. Its also much easier when backing a bike in. I have found that I do secure all bikes no matter the wheel/tire size with two straps.


Scissors jack

1. Originally, I had a $10 scissors jack form the junk yard and a 6" section of 2x4 for all my jacking needs. On a whim I bought the Amazon "motorcycle" scissors jack and abandon the car jack
2. The MC scissors jack took more effort as the handle is short. You can also take the handle off and use a socket and rachet. After about 2 years of use the threaded rod was totally stripped and the jack was rendered useless. I could not bring myself to spend another $75+ on the same thing as it would probably do the same thing. I went to Lowes and bought a RV stabilizer jack (same as a car scissors jack) for $30 and it has a long handle that makes lifting the bike quick and easy. I also got a section of 2 x 4 to put on top of the jack as a softie. I prefer the small automotive scissors jack over the MC specific jack. The smaller jack is also much lighter and to store and is rates for more weight at 1-1/2 tons.

Tie-Downs

1. I bought a couple non-ratcheting straps from HF and a couple of good quality quick clips so that the tie-downs stay with the lift. I cut the one hook off the strap and quick clipped it to the eyebolt in the table-top.
2. Also HF has a set of double loop straps for $3 per pack of 4. They are great for wrapping around for tubes then giving you a loop to hook the tie-down too. I also keep a set in the truck for tying down bikes. They are hand for when the hooks on the ratchet straps are not big enough to go over frame rails.

Another thing on the HF lift if you find it is sliding across the floor when you load a bike into it put a small section of rubber under the two levelers in the front of the lift. They do have rubber feet on them but get squished and allow the metal to contact the concrete.

Another nice ad is Tractor Supply has cut to length rubber mat for sale. Its 4 feet wide and makes a great anti fatigue mat. Get a 5 or 6 foot section and cut it down the middle.

HF also has inexpensive magnetic parts bowls. These also come in handy for holding small fasteners when working on the bike.

And finally, Amazon has 24" bar stools for not a lot of money. 2 or 4 of them are perfect for when the work is done and the bike is off the lift. Elevate the table and you have a garage bar.

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Automotive tire Automotive design Motor vehicle Aircraft Bumper
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Clean DR-Z, I'm going to look at one tomorrow, been missing having a light bike.
Thanks, it's a 2016 I picked up with 800 miles on it. Added the Seat Concepts comfort seat, IMS Pro Series pegs, 14 tooth countershaft sprocket (-1), a Racetech spring for my weight, 3x3 mod, JD jet kit with extended mixture screw, and a Rekluse clutch. Bike runs awesome, and the Rekluse is absolute money in the slow technical stuff. Oh, also Dunlop D606s in place of the death wings.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Hope some of the following will help:

Wheel vise vs chock

1. I had a Baxley sport chock bolted to the front of my HF lift and it was great for bikes with 17" 120 series tires. Puch it in and forget it. No need to tie-down. Any wheel/tire bigger or smaller the bike needed to be secured with a couple of straps.
2. My new lift has a wheel vise and while not a convenient as a wheel chock it fits a variety of wheels better and no hump to roll the bike in/out of. Its also much easier when backing a bike in. I have found that I do secure all bikes no matter the wheel/tire size with two straps.


Scissors jack

1. Originally, I had a $10 scissors jack form the junk yard and a 6" section of 2x4 for all my jacking needs. On a whim I bought the Amazon "motorcycle" scissors jack and abandon the car jack
2. The MC scissors jack took more effort as the handle is short. You can also take the handle off and use a socket and rachet. After about 2 years of use the threaded rod was totally stripped and the jack was rendered useless. I could not bring myself to spend another $75+ on the same thing as it would probably do the same thing. I went to Lowes and bought a RV stabilizer jack (same as a car scissors jack) for $30 and it has a long handle that makes lifting the bike quick and easy. I also got a section of 2 x 4 to put on top of the jack as a softie. I prefer the small automotive scissors jack over the MC specific jack. The smaller jack is also much lighter and to store and is rates for more weight at 1-1/2 tons.

Tie-Downs

1. I bought a couple non-ratcheting straps from HF and a couple of good quality quick clips so that the tie-downs stay with the lift. I cut the one hook off the strap and quick clipped it to the eyebolt in the table-top.
2. Also HF has a set of double loop straps for $3 per pack of 4. They are great for wrapping around for tubes then giving you a loop to hook the tie-down too. I also keep a set in the truck for tying down bikes. They are hand for when the hooks on the ratchet straps are not big enough to go over frame rails.

Another thing on the HF lift if you find it is sliding across the floor when you load a bike into it put a small section of rubber under the two levelers in the front of the lift. They do have rubber feet on them but get squished and allow the metal to contact the concrete.

Another nice ad is Tractor Supply has cut to length rubber mat for sale. Its 4 feet wide and makes a great anti fatigue mat. Get a 5 or 6 foot section and cut it down the middle.

HF also has inexpensive magnetic parts bowls. These also come in handy for holding small fasteners when working on the bike.

And finally, Amazon has 24" bar stools for not a lot of money. 2 or 4 of them are perfect for when the work is done and the bike is off the lift. Elevate the table and you have a garage bar.

View attachment 34028 View attachment 34029 View attachment 34030
Your forum name would suggest that you are a well equipped Sporting Clays shooter!

Thanks for the advice. When I got the GS and DRZ, I picked up the appropriate cradle from Baxley, which now holds them rock solid. I'll use it to start. Not sure what I will use long term. Thanks for the advice on the scisssor lift. All of them appear to be cheap Chinese junk with poor steel quality screw hardware. I like the RV jack idea. I just want to be able to have the bike in the chock and raise the rear of the GS enough to put on center stand. Hope this is possible. Like the tie down mod idea. I have the loops for the bars/forks. I use the Baxley in my Toyhauler and use the loops to tie down. Adult beverages go down so well when the job is done, or when you create another issue that cannot be rectified immediately. DAMHIK!
 

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Your forum name would suggest that you are a well equipped Sporting Clays shooter!

Thanks for the advice. When I got the GS and DRZ, I picked up the appropriate cradle from Baxley, which now holds them rock solid. I'll use it to start. Not sure what I will use long term. Thanks for the advice on the scisssor lift. All of them appear to be cheap Chinese junk with poor steel quality screw hardware. I like the RV jack idea. I just want to be able to have the bike in the chock and raise the rear of the GS enough to put on center stand. Hope this is possible. Like the tie down mod idea. I have the loops for the bars/forks. I use the Baxley in my Toyhauler and use the loops to tie down. Adult beverages go down so well when the job is done, or when you create another issue that cannot be rectified immediately. DAMHIK!
Former Trap shooter. I've shot a few rounds of sporting clays and never grew to like it much. Trap especially doubles marathons were to my liking. Nothing better than getting at least 500 pair of targets per day. Twice got 850 pair and always wanted to get 1000 pair but never did. Now shooting is too expensive. To shoot the same amount I did when I gave it up in 2009 I could buy a brand-new top of the line fully kitted GSA every year.

The scissors jack will raise the bike up more than enough to get the bike on the center stand. I do it frequently,
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 · (Edited)
I am 5 miles, as the crow flies, from Garland Mountain Sporting Clays. I really enjoy it, but, 12 ga. used to be $62 a flat, and it's now $105. Now feasible to reload 12s, if you can get components. That's a big IF these days. We just shoot less frequently, and I ride more. 68 degrees up on the forest roads around Suches, GA today. It was gorgeous. About in the middle of the forest roads, I noticed the pin on right side window mechanism backed half way out. The little circlip absconded. I spent the rest of the off-road journey pushing the pin back in repeatedly. Got to add some duct tape to the kit.
Tire Wheel Plant Plant community Automotive tire
 

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In 2007/08 I was getting shells for $22.50 a flat buying them buy the skid (22,000 rounds at a time). Reloading cost me about $1.25 a box buying shot a ton at a time, 34lbs of power and 10,000ea primers and wads/

I had a Mec 9000H hydraulic press and could reload 500 rds per hour.

Those days are long gone.
 

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Thanks, it's a 2016 I picked up with 800 miles on it. Added the Seat Concepts comfort seat, IMS Pro Series pegs, 14 tooth countershaft sprocket (-1), a Racetech spring for my weight, 3x3 mod, JD jet kit with extended mixture screw, and a Rekluse clutch. Bike runs awesome, and the Rekluse is absolute money in the slow technical stuff. Oh, also Dunlop D606s in place of the death wings.
Mine is a mostly stock 2011 with 17,000 miles. It cleaned up well today. Ordered some parts (bars, grips, handguards, etc) It was pretty inexpensive, will see once I get more time on it and dive into maintenance.
 
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