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I've always stayed dry in Klim Latitude. Love it. Big advantage is that you take only one suit and when it rains, you just zip up. Best advice I ever got before a big trip was from a woman friend who traveled the world riding: take only one suit for everything.
 

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Okay, I’ll be the outlier. For the record, I walked away from a 60mph takedown on my morning commute, largely without trauma beyond my concussion, and I credit that good outcome to my gear and incredible luck. ATGAT.

#1 Your jacket and pants are there to save your hide and bones in a get-off, and the only 2 coverings that will do that are leather and high heat resistant fabrics, like Kevlar and a couple of other proprietary brands from Japan and Germany. We all know leather’s limitations, like it has nearly zero abrasion resistance when wet, and its incredible hotness in hot, sunny weather.

#2 Codura is not a high heat resistant fabric, nor is polyester, nor is nylon; these polymers are all called thermoplastics because they are used by melting them into liquid form. These all melt at ~>140° which is well below the temperatures generated during a slide on tarmac. Melting also means they melt into your exposed skin, which = skin graft surgery — that is if the abrasion doesn’t burn through the fabric, then your skin, and into your bone. Klim and Aerostitch use Cordura. These fabrics require either a coating (urethane) or a bonded film (GoreTex) in order for the very slippery and round fabric fibers to keep from unraveling in normal use, hence you’ll notice that nearly EVERY Moto jacket has some whiz-bang waterproofing (to keep it from coming apart).

#3 GoreTex has lost its patent, so there are other comparable and cheaper options available. In any case, I’ve used GoreTex since the very 1st jacket was made with it and it has proven to deliver a lot less than it promised. Its promises are made under very specific laboratory conditions, namely there must be a temperature difference and a humidity difference between the inside and the outside in order for the water vapor to push thru the membrane. Remember, we sweat no matter what. So, in warm and humid weather, the fabric‘s claims diminish, eventually down to zero or possibly even negative. On the other hand, in cool, windy, lower humidity conditions, the moisture drive away from the interior will work and you’ll be happy. In the South, during summer, GoreTex is a real bummer, its a frickin’ plastic bag under your jacket. The last ugly detail is that even though things may be too warm to shut down the moisture drive, we continue to sweat, and eventually in places with warm days and cool evenings, like the mountains and out West, that interior clamminess will become very chilly and wet, which can bring on hypothermia.

#4 Because of #3, choose a system of separates, then you have the flexibility you need — a one-size-fits-all solution BLOWS In 99% of the uses. Personally, I like the cheapo PVC rain suits or one-piece moto fitted suits that pull on over the protective gear -- easy on, easy off, and I don’t sweat to death. In a get-off, it will get shredded, but who cares, it’s the real Moto gear underneath that counts. Added benefit is that rainsuit is easily washable and keeps the gnarly wet road grime off of the nice real riding gear.

#5 I use Motoport, which is all Kevlar. The stretch version is the only textile sanctioned for race use by the AMA. My suit is the mesh version, and with the full-torso armor, mesh with a variety of under layers is the right choice IMO, even in sub freezing temps. For now, I use my GoreTex type fabrics underneath because they are what I have. This solves all of the above challenges.

#6 Motoport is 100% custom made for you, and that’s for pretty much the same price. It just doesn’t have the name recognition, but it is what most of the police motor patrols are buying now. It saved my hide and its all I’ll use.
I have motoport Kevlar mesh, I agree, it’s the absolute best. The op wanted something for rain. The suit I have has a traditional rain liner which is bulky to carry around.
 

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As mentioned above, you can buy the cheap PVC type rain suit. I did. Found that in the summer I'd get just as wet as if I didn't wear it cause you sweat like a mother under that thing here in the humid south. Plus got tired of packing it.

Sent from my SM-G998U using Tapatalk
 

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Okay, I’ll be the outlier. For the record, I walked away from a 60mph takedown on my morning commute, largely without trauma beyond my concussion, and I credit that good outcome to my gear and incredible luck. ATGAT.

#1 Your jacket and pants are there to save your hide and bones in a get-off, and the only 2 coverings that will do that are leather and high heat resistant fabrics, like Kevlar and a couple of other proprietary brands from Japan and Germany. We all know leather’s limitations, like it has nearly zero abrasion resistance when wet, and its incredible hotness in hot, sunny weather.

#2 Codura is not a high heat resistant fabric, nor is polyester, nor is nylon; these polymers are all called thermoplastics because they are used by melting them into liquid form. These all melt at ~>140° which is well below the temperatures generated during a slide on tarmac. Melting also means they melt into your exposed skin, which = skin graft surgery — that is if the abrasion doesn’t burn through the fabric, then your skin, and into your bone. Klim and Aerostitch use Cordura. These fabrics require either a coating (urethane) or a bonded film (GoreTex) in order for the very slippery and round fabric fibers to keep from unraveling in normal use, hence you’ll notice that nearly EVERY Moto jacket has some whiz-bang waterproofing (to keep it from coming apart).

#3 GoreTex has lost its patent, so there are other comparable and cheaper options available. In any case, I’ve used GoreTex since the very 1st jacket was made with it and it has proven to deliver a lot less than it promised. Its promises are made under very specific laboratory conditions, namely there must be a temperature difference and a humidity difference between the inside and the outside in order for the water vapor to push thru the membrane. Remember, we sweat no matter what. So, in warm and humid weather, the fabric‘s claims diminish, eventually down to zero or possibly even negative. On the other hand, in cool, windy, lower humidity conditions, the moisture drive away from the interior will work and you’ll be happy. In the South, during summer, GoreTex is a real bummer, its a frickin’ plastic bag under your jacket. The last ugly detail is that even though things may be too warm to shut down the moisture drive, we continue to sweat, and eventually in places with warm days and cool evenings, like the mountains and out West, that interior clamminess will become very chilly and wet, which can bring on hypothermia.

#4 Because of #3, choose a system of separates, then you have the flexibility you need — a one-size-fits-all solution BLOWS In 99% of the uses. Personally, I like the cheapo PVC rain suits or one-piece moto fitted suits that pull on over the protective gear -- easy on, easy off, and I don’t sweat to death. In a get-off, it will get shredded, but who cares, it’s the real Moto gear underneath that counts. Added benefit is that rainsuit is easily washable and keeps the gnarly wet road grime off of the nice real riding gear.

#5 I use Motoport, which is all Kevlar. The stretch version is the only textile sanctioned for race use by the AMA. My suit is the mesh version, and with the full-torso armor, mesh with a variety of under layers is the right choice IMO, even in sub freezing temps. For now, I use my GoreTex type fabrics underneath because they are what I have. This solves all of the above challenges.

#6 Motoport is 100% custom made for you, and that’s for pretty much the same price. It just doesn’t have the name recognition, but it is what most of the police motor patrols are buying now. It saved my hide and its all I’ll use.
Don't Klim blend in Ceramics to the slide points to prevent the 'melting'?
 

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Hey guys,

I'd appreciate a lot some real life feedback on Gore-Tex gear regarding the waterproofness.

We're touring on road. I'm kind of fed up to keep a rainsuit in one of the cases and stop road side to put it on while it's raining when you hit the shower.

All companies have their own tech for waterproof gear but most are not very good and will eventually get you wet, which make the rainsuit mandatory on a tour.

We're looking into Klim gear, the Latitude jack and pants for me and Altitude series for the wife. So question: with that kind of gear, can I really leave the rainsuit forever at home? Will we stay dry through a 8 hour day in the rain? Is Gore-Tex really worth the investment?

All input will be greatly appreciated.

Thanks a lot guys,

Ride safe.

JFS.
Hi JFS

I have used Gortex suits for many years. My current suit is a Bikers Gear which I have been using for over ten years now. It still keeps my perfectly dry. As an example I rode up to the Open Roads Rally from Melbourne and it absolutely poured down for all 5 hours of the journey with no leaks whatsoever. My previous suit was a Hein Gericke full Gortex as well. Delivered the same performance. The only additional consideration is if you ride in cold temperatures, buy one that has a storm collar as it improves overall warmth.
 

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Hey guys,

I'd appreciate a lot some real life feedback on Gore-Tex gear regarding the waterproofness.

We're touring on road. I'm kind of fed up to keep a rainsuit in one of the cases and stop road side to put it on while it's raining when you hit the shower.

All companies have their own tech for waterproof gear but most are not very good and will eventually get you wet, which make the rainsuit mandatory on a tour.

We're looking into Klim gear, the Latitude jack and pants for me and Altitude series for the wife. So question: with that kind of gear, can I really leave the rainsuit forever at home? Will we stay dry through a 8 hour day in the rain? Is Gore-Tex really worth the investment?

All input will be greatly appreciated.

Thanks a lot guys,

Ride safe.

JFS.
Just returned from a 2,200 mile trip. Several rain storms and snow. I wear Scorpion gear. It’s not as expensive as most gear but it keeps me worm and dry. Lots of zippers to let air in when weather allows.
Good luck in your search. I’m 5’10” 220 lbs and wear a xxl.
 

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I am NOT trying to bust on anyone, but a cautionary thought: How well does anyone think the open zipper vents protect against rash? The closed plastic zippers?

How about the polyester and nylon thread used to sew the seams?

Even my gloves are sewn with Kevlar thread.
 

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Cautionary thoughts are always good. For me, like riding a motorcycle, clothing is somewhat a risk vs reward situation.

My clothing has to provide a level of protection while providing the functionality I'm looking for. There is definitely a trade off, yet one I'm willing to make to the extent I do.
 

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Cautionary thoughts are always good. For me, like riding a motorcycle, clothing is somewhat a risk vs reward situation.

My clothing has to provide a level of protection while providing the functionality I'm looking for. There is definitely a trade off, yet one I'm willing to make to the extent I do.
Very valid.....I agree
 

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No one mentioned Aerostich? I use their R3 one-piece for the last 3-years for all purpose touring and no matter rain or shine it has been solid. I also have other gear, but this is my bad weather go-to suit.

Expensive, but worth it.
 

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Hey guys,

I'd appreciate a lot some real life feedback on Gore-Tex gear regarding the waterproofness.

We're touring on road. I'm kind of fed up to keep a rainsuit in one of the cases and stop road side to put it on while it's raining when you hit the shower.

All companies have their own tech for waterproof gear but most are not very good and will eventually get you wet, which make the rainsuit mandatory on a tour.

We're looking into Klim gear, the Latitude jack and pants for me and Altitude series for the wife. So question: with that kind of gear, can I really leave the rainsuit forever at home? Will we stay dry through a 8 hour day in the rain? Is Gore-Tex really worth the investment?

All input will be greatly appreciated.

Thanks a lot guys,

Ride safe.

JFS.
Short answer is yes.
 
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