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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
Hey folks! Glad to have found this forum, looking at tapping into some of the experience here. I've owned mostly newer sport bikes and worked on quite a few vintage Honda's..this would be my first 'adventure' bike.

So this bike has parked outside around the corner for a few years and I finally got curios about it and tracked down the owner. It's an 08 with 99k kilometres (hello from Canada) and needs work. I've got it to start with brake cleaner and have just removed the fuel pump housing to bench test the fuel pump - I think it might be bad because I never heard it prime. The FPC seems to check out - I measured ~9v when cranking.

The bike:



The major issue is the swingarm gaitors - they are worn and water is sitting inside. When I first tilted the bike upright water spilled out - how bad could the driveshaft be as a result?
Second major issue is that the owner reports he was only getting 10L/100km on the highway...fuely reports state folks get 5.5L on average...huge difference...any ideas?

Minor issues:
  • the top shock bolt is partially withdrawn and only holding on by 1 side of the frame.
  • 1 screw missing from clutch slave cylinder - it rocks a little when clutch is pressed, not sure how long its been missing
  • numerous dash warning lights..what is the absolute cheapest way to pull codes...there's an app similar to Torque but the interfaces are pricey?
  • front and rear rotors have a noticeable lip, maybe close to 1mm, probably original?
  • tires are DONE
  • when I turn the ignition on, I hear rapid clicking from the rear shock for a second or two
I called BMW and there is one open recall on it - something about the rear wheel flange. Pretty entertaining how many recalls these bikes have had...I thought when you buy BMW you get a rock solid machine...are these good bikes?

Other than that, electrical seems to be good, no hacks. Quite sun beaten overall but nothing seems brittle. Owner has luggage for it.

The figure we have tentatively settled on is $3000CDN...is this reasonable?

I'm a tall rider, 6'3" with 35" inseam. TY
 

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The search tool in the forum will be your best friend.
:)
A few items to start...

Codes:
GS911 or Motoscan app

Swingarm boots/driveshaft:
Pull the entire swingarm and inspect/grease the bearings in addition to the driveshaft. Replace the boots. Replace driveshaft with a Ted Porter rebuildable if needed.

Loose bolts:
Tighten them.

Purchase advice:
Original BMW parts are notoriously expensive, you may want to price a fuel pump online. Aftermarket and used parts not as bad. 3000 Canadian doesn't sound bad but you need to budget the repairs to know what you are in for. Once you repair it it should be good for 200k of trouble free miles, but sitting outside a few years is a wildcard.
 

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$3000CAD/$2200USD is parts bike money. I'd buy it for that running or not. If it turned into a money pit (which it very well may) I pull the wheels, bodywork and fuel cell and a few other select parts then scrap the rest.
 

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Welcome Canadian friend, if you are near (or not too far) from Quebec city, I can read the codes for you.

Check with your local BMW dealer, there is a recall on the fuel pump (see attached document). You might get a new pump for free.

Anyway, it's a good thing to have all the recalls done.
 

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Looks like the poster never logged back in
Lots of one hit wonders sign up weekly. Not sure if they are phishing or are actually genuine.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Thanks for replies folks.

Appreciate the info, i was waiting for the new battery and fuel pump to get here so I could take the bike on a test run and report back.

In terms of the mechanics, i am on a budget. I do not want to swap shafts, or purchase upgraded anything...a gs911 is certainly out of the question, etc. I

Thank you, 20-100, for the offer, if you are ever in the Toronto area please feel free to connect with me, but for the tine being I will be looking at cheaper options. For my automotive endeavours, the Torque app and a $20 amazonia obd2 interface have worked well.

My main concern is the fuel mileage the PO was getting...what would cause such a increase in consumption? The bike must've felt fine enough to keep going so it as simple as a faulty O2 or MAP sensor?
 

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Not swapping the driveshaft isn't really an option if the one on it is rusted up and notchy. Full range of motion should be smooth or it should be replaced. Will be a bad day if it locks up at 130kph. As mentioned, Replace driveshaft with a Ted Porter rebuildable if needed. The good news is the Ted Porter unit is cheaper than BMW and better as it is rebuildable.

Price the MotoScan app, if too expensive look for a local BMW club and make friends, good chance one has a GS911 that may let you use.

On fuel mileage start with fresh plugs, OEM style air filter and cleaning the injectors. Typically if a coil is bad you'll know it by it running rough. Your first test ride should tell you a lot more.
 

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10L/100KM = 23 MPG
5.5L/100KM = 42.3 MPG
 

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You can get 23 mpg with full load and all the panniers on the bike. You’re fighting allot of wind that way. And fuel consumption wont be an expensive issue if you diagnose it right the first time. So after you get it fit with little to no money( bolts missing cleaning greasing etc.) find a way to read the codes.
As a side note i would like to know what type of communication the bike speaks as modern scan tools speak at least 6 languages can,can+,iso9140 etc. and an adapter could be made if a diagram of the bmw can be found that and multi meter used to probe the pins easy.
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
Got the bike running today with a fresh battery and new fuel pump. Took it for a short test ride up and down the street but the rear end was clunking...not horrible but bad enough that I wouldn't want to take it out.

Here's what some of the shaft looks like behind the boot:



As far as seating position, the thing is surprisingly tall..i could not plant my heels on the ground. Is this bike an adventure edition? With the tall seat?
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
Adapter cable 20$
Well goodie someone already did that. That’s gunna work, hot damn. Looks like maybe your most expensive problem solved. Works with an app and a common scan tool.
Thanks! So my understanding is that a common adapter won't work? That you need at least a ScanTool MX and the Motoscan app to do anything useful like reset codes or get into the ABS module to bleed it (the fluid in this bike is not fresh) and its like $80...it seems like a common OBD2 car adapter will not do it?
 

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Before I went any further, I'd trouble shoot the rear drive "clunk" to see what's wrong and if it worth it to you to repair. If a $300 GS911 is out of the question doubtful a $900 drive shaft and/or $1500 rear drive rebuild is palatable.
 
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Discussion Starter · #15 · (Edited)
Before I went any further, I'd trouble shoot the rear drive "clunk" to see what's wrong and if it worth it to you to repair. If a $300 GS911 is out of the question doubtful a $900 drive shaft and/or $1500 rear drive rebuild is palatable.
Well, it would be prudent for sure but I cant start taking the rear end apart on the street...taking some body panels off to drop in a fuel pump is about as far as I could go.

Let's say there was water sitting in the rear end at the level you see the rust buildup...are we talking all the bearings and seals in the rear gearbox would have to be changed? I don't think the needle bearings in there are sealed. How do these bikes manage water getting in through the boots?

In terms of budget, while the 911 im sure is a great unit, surely there are alternatives for someone like me who might use it a few times. Its not the absolute expense, its the value. I had a vag-com for my TDI because i was tuning it but for my gasser dailies a have a $20 dongle to meet my needs. If it needs a driveshaft, it needs a driveshaft. Worst case scenario the Ted shaft is 900 plus bearings and seals for the rear gearbox are maybe 500. Some new boots, recall flange from the dealer and im off, c'est non? He's willing to let it go for about 2k USD..

In terms of the mileage, the bike comes with full luggage so i assume he was riding fully loaded when he got 23mpg. Makes sense but also a little disappointing because a small Honda will do better, again on absolute terms.
 

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23mpg is extremely low mileage. Fully loaded and running highway speeds I’ll see mid 30’s. Never lower. I'd be curious to see of the bike is actually getting that king of mileage or the seller was just remembering wrong??

Parts for the rear drive may be in the $500 range or they may exceed that say if the gears are no good. Rebuilding a rear drive can be a little more complicated than swapping out a few bearings and seals. Setting the lash and either buying or making some specialized tools are all things most shade tree mechanics are not able or willing to do.

The Hex/camhead GS manage to keep water out rather poorly. When the boots are new and pliable the seal is with a bead of lithium grease between the boot and swingarm. It not a good design nor does it do a good job and only gets worse as the boots get dry and not as pliable and eventually crack/split.

$2000 for the bike is a good price if you don’t have to spend $5000 more to get it up and reliably running. Sometimes free ends up being too much to pay.
 

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Let's say there was water sitting in the rear end at the level you see the rust buildup...are we talking all the bearings and seals in the rear gearbox would have to be changed? I don't think the needle bearings in there are sealed. How do these bikes manage water getting in through the boots?
As mentioned, final drive particularly the front pinion seal/bearing requires a special tool and over 500 ft/lb. of torque. Sending off for all new rebuild is about $1500USD, I priced it last summer when I pad $500 for a new pinion seal job.

In terms of budget, while the 911 im sure is a great unit, surely there are alternatives for someone like me who might use it a few times. Its not the absolute expense, its the value. I had a vag-com for my TDI because i was tuning it but for my gasser dailies a have a $20 dongle to meet my needs.
My understanding is the BMW diagnostic protocol is proprietary. Only two options I've seen is GS-911 and MotoScan app. As far as I know no automotive scanner will work so your experience there is unfortunately irrelevant, welcome to B_ring M_ore W_allet country.

In terms of the mileage, the bike comes with full luggage so i assume he was riding fully loaded when he got 23mpg. Makes sense but also a little disappointing because a small Honda will do better, again on absolute terms.
Maybe you'd be happier on a Honda?
 

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As mentioned, final drive particularly the front pinion seal/bearing requires a special tool and over 500 ft/lb. of torque. Sending off for all new rebuild is about $1500USD, I priced it last summer when I pad $500 for a new pinion seal job.


My understanding is the BMW diagnostic protocol is proprietary. Only two options I've seen is GS-911 and MotoScan app. As far as I know no automotive scanner will work so your experience there is unfortunately irrelevant, welcome to B_ring M_ore W_allet country.


Maybe you'd be happier on a Honda?
From the looks of the severely corroded u-joint in the picture I'd bet the splines are dogfast and it'll take some work to get them separated. Hopefully the male splines are good but if not then you are into buying a ring and pinion set. If the transmission output shaft is in the same condition then a new transmission output shaft or donor transmission is in order. Negative equity build fast.
 

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would it be possible to pre fill it with trans fluid and acetone? That way it will fill the same as if it was full of water. Then hopefully it will help release the rusted parts. Also a product like beet juice or equivalent “evapo-rust”. But ya no need to do anything else until the damage to the “rear end” is assessed.
 

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would it be possible to pre fill it with trans fluid and acetone? That way it will fill the same as if it was full of water. Then hopefully it will help release the rusted parts. Also a product like beet juice or equivalent “evapo-rust”. But ya no need to do anything else until the damage to the “rear end” is assessed.
While trans/acetone makes a really great penetrating oil that probably not the best way to go about it. 1st try to hinge the rear wheel down. If it swings down that means at least the lower splines are not dogfast. If it doesn't hinge down then its best is to cut the boot off and then soak, heat and repeat the u-joint several times over the course of several days in hopes the oil will get between the splines and allow them to separate. If that does work, they it's time to start applying brute force.

For those who don't know acetone and ATF mixed 50/50 are an excellent penetrating oil. The acetone thins the ATF allowing it to flow into very small areas. Then the acetone evaporates and leave the ATF deposited behind. The ATF if the lubricant the acetone is more a carrier agent.
 
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