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Discussion Starter #1
Hi All
After fighting a new tourance with the spoons last night I had to call it quites and head another direction. I’ve seen the zip tie method but YouTube showed me a gent who used gorilla black tape to tape the tire together at 4 locations and with a little soap popped it on the rim with minimal effort. Well I had to share that that tourance went on with little effort and no spooning required. I will never again attemp to spoon on a tubleas tire.
 

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Ah wow yes. Personally I leave tyre changing to the professionals, well equipped. I find it hard enough on a tubeless mountain bike tyre, won't even try on a motorbike!
Those guys on youtube make it look easy.
 

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Ah wow yes. Personally I leave tyre changing to the professionals, well equipped. I find it hard enough on a tubeless mountain bike tyre, won't even try on a motorbike!
Those guys on youtube make it look easy.
I live 100 miles round trip to a dealer that'll put on a tire and I'm putting on new tires every couple months. No one in town will do it because they're scared of BMW rims. Local non BMW dealer had to buy me a new $1500 wheel! traveling to town requires me to buy their tires at inflated prices and mount service. So I buy tires online, mount and balance them myself saving hundreds of $$$. I'm getting pretty good at it too :)
 

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I have spooned on new tires several times using a modified Harbor Freight changer and a mojo lever. Oh yes, then when you get it on, getting the bead to pop is fun too. Both Pirelli Scorpions and Conti Road/Trail attacks were a b--ch. Luckily I found a guy less than half a mile from my house with all the tools AND at $10 per tire it was steel. I recommend looking around for one of these shade tree shops. It will surprise you what some of them have.


Don't let these guys tell you "you aren't using the right technique." Screw them! The right technique for me is getting someone with the right tools that knows what they are doing.
 

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I live 100 miles round trip to a dealer that'll put on a tire and I'm putting on new tires every couple months. No one in town will do it because they're scared of BMW rims. Local non BMW dealer had to buy me a new $1500 wheel! traveling to town requires me to buy their tires at inflated prices and mount service. So I buy tires online, mount and balance them myself saving hundreds of $$$. I'm getting pretty good at it too :)
Other than the rear rim having a big, automotive-style hole in the center (for which adapters are readily available), I can't see what makes a BMW rim different from any other tubeless-tire rim. I mean, if there were a difference in the rim itself, would tires made for "standard" rims even fit? So what was the problem these guys had?

Back in the mid '80s I had a couple Harley touring bikes with the enclosed chain drive. Though it was a two-sided swingarm, from the tire-change standpoint it was more like a single-sided setup in that the wheel hub/sprocket/left bearing stayed inside the enclosure on the bike; you had to remove five lug bolts through a hole in the chain housing to take off the wheel itself. And even though I found the process of removing/installing the wheel to be, if anything, easier than on a conventional setup, I knew many dealers who charged extra for the enclosed-chain bikes or flat-out refused to do them unless you brought the wheel in by itself. Go figure.
 

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I've spooned on many tires in my 50 years or owning motorcycles. When I started getting older I went in with my brother an bought a NoMar. To be honest it wasn't much better. We now have a Weaver simply because I'm to old for that crap anymore. If you can find someone to share the cost it's worth it. I think Atlas is now selling the same one in a different color for less money. https://www.gregsmithequipment.com/Atlas-TC211-Tire-Changer
 

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I've never tried ty-wraps or tape, actually never heard of using tape until now. Good ideas to try sometime, but I've never had a problem using spoons, like they say if you're fighting it, you're doing something wrong.

Thanks for sharing this idea.
brian
 

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Other than the rear rim having a big, automotive-style hole in the center (for which adapters are readily available), I can't see what makes a BMW rim different from any other tubeless-tire rim. I mean, if there were a difference in the rim itself, would tires made for "standard" rims even fit? So what was the problem these guys had?

Back in the mid '80s I had a couple Harley touring bikes with the enclosed chain drive. Though it was a two-sided swingarm, from the tire-change standpoint it was more like a single-sided setup in that the wheel hub/sprocket/left bearing stayed inside the enclosure on the bike; you had to remove five lug bolts through a hole in the chain housing to take off the wheel itself. And even though I found the process of removing/installing the wheel to be, if anything, easier than on a conventional setup, I knew many dealers who charged extra for the enclosed-chain bikes or flat-out refused to do them unless you brought the wheel in by itself. Go figure.
Low man on the totem pole get tire duty and they tend to be inexperienced and ham fisted! Dealer hit the TSP sensor once and paid BMW dealer to replace it. Second time hit the TPS sensor so hard it bent the TSP senor hole and couldn't be sealed! New wheel $1500! And this is a multi motorcycle dealer including Indians that have TSP :(
 

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Discussion Starter #10
I’m telling you guys squish the beads together tape them at 4 spots lube tire and rim with dish soap and push it on. No tools required. The soap also helps the bead. I was amazed. I look forward to changing another. I also got the mark Parnes balancer and adapter. Very nice!
 

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That simple ? Well I'll have to look that up...
How about removing a used tire, what's the easiest way ?

Sent from my LG-H815 using Tapatalk
 

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Discussion Starter #12
Removing the old. Break the bead with the kick stand, lube and spoon off. I’ve never had issue getting the old off. I have 2 motion pro spoons.
 

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I attempted changing my tires with spoons. Those Heidenau K60s are hard as rock. I ended up damaging the bead in a couple places on the brand tire. $194 down the drain. Now it's just hanging up on my garage wall as a decoration. :|
 

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I attempted changing my tires with spoons. Those Heidenau K60s are hard as rock. I ended up damaging the bead in a couple places on the brand tire. $194 down the drain. Now it's just hanging up on my garage wall as a decoration. :|
I see people changing tire by the side of the road on Youtubes with a couple spoons and Just wonder how they did it! I put on my own Shinko 705 with at least 3 big spoons and super tire snot after the tire sat cooking in the sun for quite awhile. Can't imagine K60s!
 

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My question is about simple method for balance if I change tire on the road (front or rear). If I need some simple tool or so similar? Is that possible?
Next question is speed limit (approximately mph/ or km/h) without balance?
 

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Many tires these days are pretty well balanced off the shelf. They don't even come with the markings to denote the light spot. What I'd recommend is the next time you have the tire off balance the wheel before mounting the tire. When the tire is mounted you''ll need little to no extra weight.

As for how fast can you go with an unbalanced tire? As fast as you feel comfortable. When you feel the unbalance slow down. There's no mph/kph magic number. If you need 10 grams to balance your tire you may not feel anything at any speed. If you need 225 grams (about 8 oz) you'll notice an issue right a way. Example: a friend had too many helpers changing a tire once and wound up with a small tire iron inside the tire. He didn't get half a block before he turned around.
 

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@marc: Thank You Very Much for Info friend, up to this moment I have not need to make this on the road, but prefer just to be informed, good to know that nowadays tires are enough balanced;
@rsmith: I like this way of social live :wink2: when is possible prefer it :grin2:;
@jaxon: very good, but I haven't enough place in the garage, cool tool :grin2:
 
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