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I heard that most tire centers, for cars and motorcycles, refuse to work with tires which have sealant filled because of the messiness (in the old time, those sealant-in-a-can even used flammable propellant, which caused explosions). I have never used sealant on car's or motorcycle's tires so I do not know the truth of my first statement. Any of you know whether what I heard is true or not? I have used sealant in my tubeless tires of my mountain bicycles. The sealant works wonderfully against thorns and nails. I have always wanted to put some sort of motorcycle sealant into my BMW tires but worry that: 1) tire center refuse to fix/replace the tires. 2) the sealant may not be compatible to the tire bacon plugs. Do you know if the Ride-On sealant is compatible to the tire bacon plugs? Thank you.
 

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I do not use Ride-On tire sealant but cannot imagine why a tire shop would refuse to work on a tire that has it in it. Unlike aersol like Fix-A-Flat or liquids like Slime Ride-On adheres and coats the inner tire basically lining it with a sticky film.

As for compatibility with a bacon strip type plug I don't know why would need to use both unless you had a huge hole or tear in the tire. I would imagine the Ride-On would seal around a tire plug no problem. Just not sure if it would also lubricate the plug allowing it to push/pull from the puncture??

 

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2016 R1200GS
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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
I do not use Ride-On tire sealant but cannot imagine why a tire shop would refuse to work on a tire that has it in it. Unlike aersol like Fix-A-Flat or liquids like Slime Ride-On adheres and coats the inner tire basically lining it with a sticky film.

As for compatibility with a bacon strip type plug I don't know why would need to use both unless you had a huge hole or tear in the tire. I would imagine the Ride-On would seal around a tire plug no problem. Just not sure if it would also lubricate the plug allowing it to push/pull from the puncture??

Thank you for your responses thus far. Many of your questions and concerns can be answered on Ride-On’s website. I can tell you after twenty-one years of constant use the following: non flammable, non corrosive, bio degradable, washes away from a used tire using an ordinary garden hose. I will not ride without it, my Shoei NeoTec 2 helmet and HeLite air vest. Lastly, you will not find a traditional lead weight on either my GS or GTL wheels all thanks to Ride-On.
 

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I don't know. I seem to get along just fine with a tire repair kit and tire pump for the last 50+ years of riding. Most of the time I'm out hundireds of miles away from anyone. No BMW dealer at the next exit.
 

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I just re-read the post and are you sure the ride-on really worked? I though the idea is it is supposed to seal the puncture not slow the leak if you can call suddenly dropping from 42 to 32 psi slow?

I got an error message on my bike's TFT screen alerting me to a sudden drop in PSI in my rear tire; from the recommended 42PSI down to 32PSI

Seems like the TMPS sensor was the bigger hero in alerting you there was an issue?

Either way glad you made able to make it to the shop for a replacment w/o incident.
 

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Can you use Ride - On with a TPMS system?? I thought it gums up the sensor and thus doesn't work. I've used Ride On with other bikes and it works well.
 

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Can you use Ride - On with a TPMS system?? I thought it gums up the sensor and thus doesn't work. I've used Ride On with other bikes and it works well.
Gleaned from the Rid-On site:

 

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2016 R1200GS
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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Can you use Ride - On with a TPMS system?? I thought it gums up the sensor and thus doesn't work. I've used Ride On with other bikes and it works well.
Yes, with the exception of early year models of the Honda GL1800 Goldwing. Never ever had an issue with the product.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
I just re-read the post and are you sure the ride-on really worked? I though the idea is it is supposed to seal the puncture not slow the leak if you can call suddenly dropping from 42 to 32 psi slow?

I got an error message on my bike's TFT screen alerting me to a sudden drop in PSI in my rear tire; from the recommended 42PSI down to 32PSI

Seems like the TMPS sensor was the bigger hero in alerting you there was an issue?

Either way glad you made able to make it to the shop for a replacment w/o incident.
The sensor did its job in alerting me of air loss; Ride-On did its job in stopping the leak.
 

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.... As for compatibility with a bacon strip type plug I don't know why would need to use both unless you had a huge hole or tear in the tire. I would imagine the Ride-On would seal around a tire plug no problem. Just not sure if it would also lubricate the plug allowing it to push/pull from the puncture??
I always view the sealant as a very, very short-term fix against the sudden loss of tire pressure. The sealant would give me the added safety on controlling the bike (after the puncture) and on choosing where to stop to fix the tire. Once I find out about the puncture, even if it is small, I would want to remove the cause (nails, etc.) and put a better fix on the tire, whether with a bacon strip plug, or patching from the inside, or replacing the tire. Hence the question about compatibility of sealants and bacon strip plugs. My guess is that they are compatible but would like to hear facts from this huge forum.
 

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The atmosphere. Call 336.456.7077 if you care to discuss further.
Bruce is right. The air leaks out to the atmosphere. It is no joke. The sealants need the air leakage to fix the holes.

This is based on my tubeless mountain bike experience but my GUESS would be similar to sealants in motorcycle tires. Note that I am wanting to but have never used sealants in my motorcycle tires. When a puncture occurred on the tire, the air rushes out of the hole and along with the air, the sealant. How much air loss is depending on the size of the hole, the thickness of sealant and the quality of the sealant. At the initial time, the liquid sealant is sprayed out through the hole. When the sealant contacts the outside air, it starts to clot the hole. Eventually, the leak gets smaller and then the leak stops. Most sealants would have gritty particles or short strands of fibers to speed up the clotting process and reducing air loss. Sealants inside the tire also get dried out, thickened over time and cannot do their job effectively and would take longer time to stop the leak. I have to check and refill or replace my sealant every few months on my mountain bike tires.

There are videos on YouTube explaining how tire sealants work. There are always some air losses. There are also videos comparing one sealant brand vs. others. The winner is the one with the least air loss based on the same hole size.

So in Bruce case, maybe the hole was big and it would take 10psi to seal the hole.
 

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The atmosphere. Call 336.456.7077 if you care to discuss further.
Not being argumentative just trying to understand if Ride-On is al it is made out to be. I was skeptical about this product before you made your post and your expierence has done nothing to make me want to use this product.

I don't really see how this product "saved your bacon" and in my opinion it actually failed by allowing 10 PSI to escape. If it had not been for your TMPS alerting you to the "sudden drop in pressure" you could have very well continued to ride until the tire was severely underinflated or even flat.
 

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Not being argumentative just trying to understand if Ride-On is al it is made out to be. I was skeptical about this product before you made your post and your expierence has done nothing to make me want to use this product.

I don't really see how this product "saved your bacon" and in my opinion it actually failed by allowing 10 PSI to escape. If it had not been for your TMPS alerting you to the "sudden drop in pressure" you could have very well continued to ride until the tire was severely underinflated or even flat.
I am not salesperson for Ride-On or any other brands. I am just a believer of tire sealants in general. I expect the followings:

1) In the best case scenarios, tire sealant stops the leak with minimal air pressure loss. I may not even know about the puncture but as soon as I find out, I will try to put a better fix for it.

2) In the less ideal scenarios, the leak is much slower but not totally stop. The sealant does it job by preventing sudden and total loss of air and allowing me to travel further to a safer stop to fix the tire, or for me to refill the tire with air to get to a tire shop.

3) In the worse case scenarios, the puncture is beyond the capability of the sealant, I hope the sealant would buy me a few minutes or a few seconds more (compared to no-sealant) for me to stop safely on the side of the road (and save my bacon).

There is no available magic solution that would make our tires bulletproof and prevents any loss of air pressure yet. I wish I could think of one and then be rich :D .
 

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So are we talking about "tire sealants" or "leak slower downers"?

I get there will be a "some" loss of pressure if there is a puncture until the sealant can take effect. I'd not expect 25% loss until the "sealant" can activate especially from a nail that was still in the tire partially plugging the leak????

I'm not saying this elixir doesn't work or partially work but it is not panacea. Yes it allowed the rider to make it to the next exit (assume a mile or 2) is not bacon saving material. The TMPS was the devise that made the alert. If there were no TPMS the OP would have most likely passed the exit and rode until the tire was significantly deflated.
 

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Discussion Starter · #18 ·
Bruce is right. The air leaks out to the atmosphere. It is no joke. The sealants need the air leakage to fix the holes.

This is based on my tubeless mountain bike experience but my GUESS would be similar to sealants in motorcycle tires. Note that I am wanting to but have never used sealants in my motorcycle tires. When a puncture occurred on the tire, the air rushes out of the hole and along with the air, the sealant. How much air loss is depending on the size of the hole, the thickness of sealant and the quality of the sealant. At the initial time, the liquid sealant is sprayed out through the hole. When the sealant contacts the outside air, it starts to clot the hole. Eventually, the leak gets smaller and then the leak stops. Most sealants would have gritty particles or short strands of fibers to speed up the clotting process and reducing air loss. Sealants inside the tire also get dried out, thickened over time and cannot do their job effectively and would take longer time to stop the leak. I have to check and refill or replace my sealant every few months on my mountain bike tires.

There are videos on YouTube explaining how tire sealants work. There are always some air losses. There are also videos comparing one sealant brand vs. others. The winner is the one with the least air loss based on the same hole size.

So in Bruce case, maybe the hole was big and it would take 10psi to seal the hole.
The plugs from Sa
 

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Folks, I still need your helps in answering one of my questions relating to sealant in tires: would the tire centers refuse to work (fix or replace new) on tires with sealant filled?
 
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