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After recommendations for waterproof riding/hiking boots. I have decent road boots but they are no good for extended walking/hiking, I am tending to go for more of a work safety boot, waterproof and a high ankle, my main concern is how do they go changing gear with a larger toe cap (steel cap)...anyone using something like this? how do you find it? I would guess enduro/adventure boots have similar chunky toes sections if not bigger and plenty of people use these
 

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It all depends on how much protection you want. For extended miles of pavement you really want something like a motocross boot to protect your ankles in an off. A hiking boot won't do that. You can always pack a pair of hiking boots for when you stop.

For road use a tight laced work boot likely offers same protection of road and most 'adventure' boots. A steel toe should not mess with shifting.

 

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Klim outlander GTX might work for what youre looking for.

After recommendations for waterproof riding/hiking boots. I have decent road boots but they are no good for extended walking/hiking, I am tending to go for more of a work safety boot, waterproof and a high ankle, my main concern is how do they go changing gear with a larger toe cap (steel cap)...anyone using something like this? how do you find it? I would guess enduro/adventure boots have similar chunky toes sections if not bigger and plenty of people use these
 

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I've not found motorcycle boots that are comfortable for other activities. I have, however, used regular side-zip boots used for military/law enforcement/security to do well. They have some mesh on the sides and leather where the safety counts. I've had good luck with Bates boots. That company did, at one time, make motorcycle boots. The toe area is not huge and is comfortable for walking. I do not have boots with steel toes.

You might have luck going that way.
 

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After recommendations for waterproof riding/hiking boots. I have decent road boots but they are no good for extended walking/hiking, I am tending to go for more of a work safety boot, waterproof and a high ankle, my main concern is how do they go changing gear with a larger toe cap (steel cap)...anyone using something like this? how do you find it? I would guess enduro/adventure boots have similar chunky toes sections if not bigger and plenty of people use these
Steel toes do interfere with shifting because of the high profile. I have to wear steel toed boots for work and when I use my bike to commute I have to radically change my shifting foot to almost point down to get under the shifter. Another issue I have found is that steel holds heat, and the proximity to the heads makes them a bit hotter Sidi Adventure boots
After recommendations for waterproof riding/hiking boots. I have decent road boots but they are no good for extended walking/hiking, I am tending to go for more of a work safety boot, waterproof and a high ankle, my main concern is how do they go changing gear with a larger toe cap (steel cap)...anyone using something like this? how do you find it? I would guess enduro/adventure boots have similar chunky toes sections if not bigger and plenty of people use these
Before purchasing my Sidi Adventure boots I used to wear a pair of White’s Boots, logger type. They have strong ankle support a steel shank and once broken in, allow for shifter movement. They are custom boots so they can be ordered with a chunky Vibram sole or a less aggressive sole. I worked in the forest industry so the sole on mine is aggressive. They do not have a steel toe so shifting is not an issue. I currently have to wear steel toed boots for work, when I commute on my bike I have to radically adjust my shifting to almost point my toe downwards to get the steel toe under the shifter. Somewhat uncomfortable but it works. BTW the White’s are all day hikers, they have an anatomical fit that truly allows your feet a comfortable position all they long.
 

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i'm an avid hiker and i just bring my trail running shoes with and lock my riding boots in my hard case panniers. i have a pair of steel toes for work and they are too heavy for hiking. my adv boots are great for riding but pretty abysmal for walking more than a few yards.
 

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I bought some Redwing boots Model 4200 and I got the steel toe so I had to adjust the shifter up a little. I'm an inspector for an engineering co. on Municipal construction so I needed a work/riding boot. They make the boot without a steel toe also.


2006 BMW R1200 GS
 

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I'm not sure there is such a thing as riding/hiking boots as each of those activities has very different needs. You'll seldom fall at 80 km/h whilst hiking or have a heavy bike land on you. I wouldn't expect my helmet and sun hat to do double duty either. If you are looking for decent boots for riding around town and doing a bit of walking, the aforementioned Klim Outlanders work quite well for that. I'm quite happy with mine and find the BOAs system is much better than I thought it would be. But if I was planning to ride around Southern Utah and then go for a real hike there would definitely be two pair of footwear with me.
 

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I have Irish Setter Wingshooter boots that always keep me dry and very comfortable from day one. I have a lot of miles on them as I use them bird hunting as well and they are still in great shape. They are the same company as Red Wing boots.
 

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I'm not sure there is such a thing as riding/hiking boots as each of those activities has very different needs. You'll seldom fall at 80 km/h whilst hiking or have a heavy bike land on you. I wouldn't expect my helmet and sun hat to do double duty either. If you are looking for decent boots for riding around town and doing a bit of walking, the aforementioned Klim Outlanders work quite well for that. I'm quite happy with mine and find the BOAs system is much better than I thought it would be. But if I was planning to ride around Southern Utah and then go for a real hike there would definitely be two pair of footwear with me.
See post #9
 

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Altberg, in the UK, make a combined motorcycle/hiking boot. I don't have personal experience yet, but came across them on someone's RTW motorcycle blog (I forget who). They listed the equipment they couldn't do without and included these boots. I intend to get measured for them on some future visit to the UK!
 
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