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I’ve not ridden a GSA, I’m strictly a GS guy.

yes, the suspension of the GS is biased to the tarmac, but there are much better aftermarket suspensions available, and I’m not referring to Ohlins, so through judicious spending, one can “fix” the GS to be more off-roady.

I’ve ridden some shocking single tracks on my stock 2017 Rallye, and I would compare it to riding a1/2 suspended mountain bike. It can be somewhat stiff, but I just take things more slowly than guys in smaller, softer bikes.

What I like so much about my bike is thathere in NorCal, we have sick mountain tarmac galore…with tons of awesome Forest Service logging roads that lead off to wonderful off-road choices ranging from easy to gnarly. My Rallye is the perfect “point and shoot” beast — I see something interesting and the bike says “yes. “👍🏼👍🏼
 

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IMG_20210514_115249.jpg


I had my first contact with TET recently, I tried it on street tyres and - oh boy... A wild ride it was! To be honest, the best way to learn falling from bike is to do it on such deep soft sand, and I did tested it for soft landings a lot :) I crashed, but I loved it and I plan on switching to more offroad oriented tires like tkc80 to do some more TET adventures. In the sand front wheel is going crazy and I had a lot of sketchy recovers, but this is fun to challenge it and master these difficulties. GS is far from easy in the sand, but it's possible to learn how to deal with it, mototrek tutorials from Bret Tkacs were super helpful here. Hard patched fire roads, gravel and dry forest roads are easy and fun to ride on this big bike. I'm afraid of getting into soaking wet mud and swampy meadows.

There's one super important lesson learned on my small offroad adventure, never ever go alone if you risk any falling from bike or getting stuck in mud.

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I don’t trailer my bike anywhere. I ride whatever bike I’m on into whatever terrain I encounter. I promise you that doesn’t always end well, but it usually does. And either way, it goes to show me what I can accomplish on the bike I’m on.

If you don’t try, you’ll never know and will always wonder.
 

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I don’t trailer my bike anywhere. I ride whatever bike I’m on into whatever terrain I encounter. I promise you that doesn’t always end well, but it usually does. And either way, it goes to show me what I can accomplish on the bike I’m on.

If you don’t try, you’ll never know and will always wonder.
I’m generally of the same mind. Except when I bring pops along. Here’s our plan to get to MOA in Great Falls next month.
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AB7C4BCA-645C-4EFD-A7EB-846DA84D5D31.jpeg
 

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Echo that X 100.
and echoed by just about everyone who ever had done it.
there are some great schools to be had. BMW, Rawhyde, West 38 Moto, Motoventures, etc etc.

What’s funny to me is that many of us will go ahead and buy a good skid plate for $500 and won’t ride where it would likely be needed because we don’t have the skills. But we won’t spend that on training, which will be used every time we turn the key. It s human nature mostly. I was that way until my first off road class. It changed my life.
 

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I take motorcycle classes fairly often. I have taken the BMW off road class twice. Bill Conger (former Chief BMW Performance Center Trainer) has also come to my place in Kansas a number of time to give classes. When he is there he will work with me one on one.

Last week, Chris Smith and I along with two friends from Minnesota (Brant and Mike) met up with Bill Conger for 3.5 days in intense off black top training and .5 day on blacktop in the Smokey Mountains.

It was the best motorcycle experience I have ever had. All 4 of use are better riders because of the time spent with Bill.

Chris, Brant, Mike and Bill were on 1200GSA. I was on my 1250GSA. Bill would spend time in the morning and lunch giving general advice on what was ahead and thing to practice while riding. He would then be the last rider in the group. While riding he would watch the person in front of him. After a number of miles he would pass that rider and start watching the next in line, he would continue that routine until he has watched everyone and then stop the group to give instructions on what were were doing right as well as wrong. We would then start the process over again. The only difference would be the order the students were taking.

The majority of the roads were similar in difficulty to forest service roads in the Ozarks. However there were a few places that were tougher than anything I have done in the Ozarks or Colorado because of the length of the difficult area. On mountain climb was an extremely steep incline that started off with stair steps for 100 yards with lots of loose rock making it difficult to gain traction. After the rock garden the climb was full of 3-4 foot ruts and potholes with boulders of all sizes thrown in that needed to be dodged. Picking a line was difficult because a rider would not see a boulder until you were almost on top if it. The total length of the incline was about 3/4 to a mile with no place to stop along the way. That may not sound like much but when working so hard to get up the mountain we all needed a break (except Bill).

There was not a lot of opportunity to take pictures because we were all working on our riding. However, Mike and I were the first to climb on a steep section and and that gave us time to take pictures while waiting for the others.

One of the ruts at the top of the mountain:

Image


I was not walking down to far down to get pictures lower in the mountain because I didn't want to walk back up. On the left of the picture (the gray area) is a ledge and a huge hole that can't be seen. You needed speed and gravity to stay on the right edge.

Image


Far left was an easier line. I went over the old phone cables:

Image


Chris Smith at the top of the mountain:

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The crew at the top. We are sitting on the Appalachian Trail:

Image


We had a few water crossing. This was a river and was about 50 yards long with a turn in the river.
Image


The scenery was fantastic:

Image


Image


We all learned so very much riding with Bill. He has the knowledge and know how to share it. It made learning easier. All came out much better riders because of our experience. The 4 of us are already talking to Bill about another class.

We as a group would ride about 125 to 135 miles in a day and at the end of the day we were exhausted.
 

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I take motorcycle classes fairly often. I have taken the BMW off road class twice. Bill Conger (former Chief BMW Performance Center Trainer) has also come to my place in Kansas a number of time to give classes. When he is there he will work with me one on one.

Last week, Chris Smith and I along with two friends from Minnesota (Brant and Mike) met up with Bill Conger for 3.5 days in intense off black top training and .5 day on blacktop in the Smokey Mountains.

It was the best motorcycle experience I have ever had. All 4 of use are better riders because of the time spent with Bill.

Chris, Brant, Mike and Bill were on 1200GSA. I was on my 1250GSA. Bill would spend time in the morning and lunch giving general advice on what was ahead and thing to practice while riding. He would then be the last rider in the group. While riding he would watch the person in front of him. After a number of miles he would pass that rider and start watching the next in line, he would continue that routine until he has watched everyone and then stop the group to give instructions on what were were doing right as well as wrong. We would then start the process over again. The only difference would be the order the students were taking.

The majority of the roads were similar in difficulty to forest service roads in the Ozarks. However there were a few places that were tougher than anything I have done in the Ozarks or Colorado because of the length of the difficult area. On mountain climb was an extremely steep incline that started off with stair steps for 100 yards with lots of loose rock making it difficult to gain traction. After the rock garden the climb was full of 3-4 foot ruts and potholes with boulders of all sizes thrown in that needed to be dodged. Picking a line was difficult because a rider would not see a boulder until you were almost on top if it. The total length of the incline was about 3/4 to a mile with no place to stop along the way. That may not sound like much but when working so hard to get up the mountain we all needed a break (except Bill).

There was not a lot of opportunity to take pictures because we were all working on our riding. However, Mike and I were the first to climb on a steep section and and that gave us time to take pictures while waiting for the others.

One of the ruts at the top of the mountain:

Image


I was not walking down to far down to get pictures lower in the mountain because I didn't want to walk back up. On the left of the picture (the gray area) is a ledge and a huge hole that can't be seen. You needed speed and gravity to stay on the right edge.

Image


Far left was an easier line. I went over the old phone cables:

Image


Chris Smith at the top of the mountain:

Image


The crew at the top. We are sitting on the Appalachian Trail:

Image


We had a few water crossing. This was a river and was about 50 yards long with a turn in the river.
Image


The scenery was fantastic:

Image


Image


We all learned so very much riding with Bill. He has the knowledge and know how to share it. It made learning easier. All came out much better riders because of our experience. The 4 of us are already talking to Bill about another class.

We as a group would ride about 125 to 135 miles in a day and at the end of the day we were exhausted.
If you see training coming up in the Midwest pass it on....I've yet to find much closer than Rawhyde in Colorado.
 

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Watch the “booking” tab on west 38 Moto

Also watch the BMW MOA sight as we are providing classes for them at their requested locations.
you might try googling Bill Dragoo as he has a good school somewhere in the Midwest I believe.
Bill is in Norman, OK...about 8 hours from me and the closest.
 
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