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1988 R100 RT, 2018 R1200 GS
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I took my bike in for service yesterday, and went out to the garage to make sure the tire pressure was good. It was about 35 F (2 C) and set my tire pressure to spec (36 front and 42 rear). While riding I checked tire pressure and the bike (2018 R1200 GS) indicated 40 front and 45 rear. I get that air expands when heated, but I thought that a rather large bump. Typically, the bike is within one psi of my gauge. My guess is that the increase is due to the air in the tires warming up. What do people normally do here? Is it best to be 1-2 psi low when checking when cold or just not worry about the increase?
 

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2006 R1200GS, 2007 R1200GS. 2005 R1200GS, 2009 R1200GS, 2009 R1200GSA, 2005 R1200GS, 2006 R1200GS, 2
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2,392 Posts
I have aftermarket TPMS sensors on one of the GS's and along with pressure they also read temperature. If interesting watching the pressure swings as the tire heats up or cools down if you encounter rain.

It is generally accepted that a 3 or 4 PSI increase for a heated-up tire is good. If the tire pressure is exceeding 4 PSI then the starting pressure is too low.

FWIW I've found the one board TPMS on my 2008 GSA to be about as accurate as a Veglia tachometer on an Italian motorcycle.
 
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R1250GS 2021
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597 Posts
All the manufacturers (cars or bikes) have the tire pressure recommendation when cold. They know the air will expand when tire is warmed up, so their recommendation for cold pressure is already lower then "working" pressure. So just stick with what they recommend and make sure you check the pressure with tires cold.
 

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2016 R1200GSA
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50 Posts
Actually the tire recommendation for a BMW bike is at 68 degrees I think and the TPMS is temperature compensated to that temp so the pressure it is displaying is the pressure it would be at if the temperature was 68 degrees.

So setting them to spec at 35 degrees will result in them being above pressure at 68 and at operating temp.

This is all in my owners manual so refer to yours. Mine is a 2016.
 

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I took my bike in for service yesterday, and went out to the garage to make sure the tire pressure was good. It was about 35 F (2 C) and set my tire pressure to spec (36 front and 42 rear). While riding I checked tire pressure and the bike (2018 R1200 GS) indicated 40 front and 45 rear. I get that air expands when heated, but I thought that a rather large bump. Typically, the bike is within one psi of my gauge. My guess is that the increase is due to the air in the tires warming up. What do people normally do here? Is it best to be 1-2 psi low when checking when cold or just not worry about the increase?
Be mindful a lot of tyre pressure gauges are inaccurate as well.
Had mine checked by our calibration team (I work for an airline) and found both my pocket gauge and compressor gauge were under reading by about 2-3 PSI.
Comparing the cold set pressures the bike read only 1 PSI less than the corrected pressures, so it’s accuracy is not too bad.
So there is some variables.
So set cold pressure and go enjoy the ride!
 
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