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Many of those videos are very helpful - HOWEVER - I have just finished lubing the splines on my 2016 GSA and it was a total disaster of an exercise!!! I pulled the entire driveshaft out, cleaned everything up and lubed everything and then went to reassemble everything. I had little trouble inserting the driveshaft on to the gearbox end BUT the final drive end took me the better part of 2 days of trying and retrying before it managed to pop on!!!!!! I actually ended up inventing new swear words! It just seems to be the luck of the draw - when it eventually popped on it was totally without any pressure or resistence. So - be warned and be patient!
I'm gonna guess that you didn't have the transmission end fully in. I've never removed that end and the rear alway went on with a few minutes of fiddling.
 

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Hey guys… cant find no recommended lube product in canada that dont cost like 75$ plus shipping from outside canada..
only thingi can find in a moto shop here are these 2
Liqui moly lm48 it has tungsten instead of moly
Or
Liqui moly lm47 , this one does have moly..

any you guys use one of these??
 

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2006 R1200GS, 2007 R1200GS. 2005 R1200GS, 2009 R1200GS, 2009 R1200GSA, 2005 R1200GS, 2006 R1200GS, 2
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Hey guys… cant find no recommended lube product in canada that dont cost like 75$ plus shipping from outside canada..
only thingi can find in a moto shop here are these 2
Liqui moly lm48 it has tungsten instead of moly
Or
Liqui moly lm47 , this one does have moly..

any you guys use one of these??
There are 100's if not 1000's of spline lubes out there. Pick one, use it and go about your day. Any auto parts store, heavy machinery repair shop or marine store should have it. I used to use Moly Honda Paste 60 but now that it has been discontinued have switched to Wurth SIG 3000 that has no moly.

If you wan to ride down to Pennsylvania I'll give you a few ounces of Wurth SIG 3000 grease that will be enough to lube the spline on you GS many times. Or give MG Cycles a shout in Wisconsin ans see what shipping is to Trudyland


This product is a multi-purpose grease fortified with special additives enabling it to withstand the heavy impact and pounding pressures common to heavy equipment. Our special additive package allows the grease to stay in place and not to spatter or pound out of the bearing or fitting. Most greases manufactured today do not have this anti-spatter capability.

The product contains extreme pressure additives to provide long life under heavy loads, up to 65,000 PSI - 65 Timken load. This grease will withstand temperatures up to 550F. It has superior water resistance and resists most acids, salt spray, steam, dirt, dust and weather. We have also blended extra rust, corrosion and oxidation inhibitors into this product. You now have a grease that not only resists high temperatures and heavy loads, but also provides extra protection of equipment with its superior anti-spatter capabilities. A true long lasting product that can replace many commercially available greases.


Features:
  • Lasts longer than many conventional greases, won’t pound out
  • Performs at a wide range of operating temperatures up to +500F
  • Excellent load carrying capability -65 Timken load
  • Superior water resistance
  • Special rust and corrosion inhibitors
  • Resists most acids, weather, dirt, water, steam and oxidation
  • Synthetic formula will not burn grass on golf courses


Warning
This product can expose you to Quartz which is known to the State of California to cause cancer.


For more information go to: https://www.p65warnings.ca.gov/
 

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104 Posts
Hey guys… cant find no recommended lube product in canada that dont cost like 75$ plus shipping from outside canada..
only thingi can find in a moto shop here are these 2
Liqui moly lm48 it has tungsten instead of moly
Or
Liqui moly lm47 , this one does have moly..

any you guys use one of these??
The spline lube is pretty easy. There are a lot of good moly products at auto parts stores. It should have over 60% moly. The lithium paste that's needed to seal the rubber boot to the housings is pricey. There are a couple of them out there. They should say

My "trick" is to use a length of 16 gauge house wire through the u-joint to hold the shaft in the right place and angle while I tilt up the drive unit. I use the same trick to get the front connection as well. I've found that it helps to level the swing arm when installing the front, I use a couple of ratchet straps to raise up the swing arm.
The goop you use on the rubber to seal it should say (didn't finish above....Doh!) Should say: "NBU30 PTM"

The white lithium grease used for car door hinges etc is not the stuff. Might work? But it's thinner and I wouldn't recommend it. It's pretty important to seal this area from water incursion, so, I got the real McCoy.

Kluber Lubrication (Germany) STABURAGS (I think this is their line of special lubes...some German word that I don't know the meaning of...not important.)

The important bit is "NBU30 PTM". This Kluber branded stuff costs about $60 for a small tube...probably enough to get your bike to 100,000 miles. I used it for this session. I don't expect that water will enter my driveshaft case through there.

BTW: I saw a listing for a 5 gallon bucket of Kluber for only $12,495.67...Stock up now!

There is another company selling NBU30 PTM on Amazon...also expensive, but a bit less than Kluber. Kluber comes in a black/yellow tube. The competing one comes in a white plastic "cold cream" type jar with threaded top. Pick your poison. Both are expensive. I bought one of each to see if there was any difference. They look and feel exactly the same to me. I think there's a BMW branded one too...made by Kluber.

I also bought a big tube of standard lithium grease for $8 at the "good" local auto parts store, the one where they actually sell stuff to people who fix cars. ...It's not the same. If you want to take a chance using it, go nuts. I'm going to stick with NBU30 PTM.
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Agree with the above comments concerning getting the spline back together..make sure the drive-shaft is pushed all the way in before you start. Boxflyer shows an example of a bike that had a rusty spline and the trans end got pulled out. He shows pushing it back in with his thumbs until it clicks...I doubt my thumbs are that strong anymore. I'd use some sort of leverage or soft hammer with a wooden dowel to get that in...The boot should be completely off while you're doing that part. Don't hammer with a lot of force. There are needle bearings in the U-joint that might not react well to that. Just enough.

One problem I had was the weight of the FD. I used a floor jack with a towel over it. Use a towel so you don't scratch up the housing.

Watch the videos before you try it..again, the Boxflyer one covering 1250s was the one that worked for me.

IMPORTANT!...Before you try this spline lube procedure or even take off a wheel, tie the center stand to the front of the frame or engine crash bar or around the front rim. You don't want the center stand to fold up while you're working...and it can happen...so start with that. You can use a rope, strap or chain to tie it...but not a bungie because it'll stretch too much once the weight of the bike starts to move the stand. Stretch is not your friend here.

I have a short adjustable strap with clips that came with something or other that I don't use. It's so perfect, I keep it with my tool kit. Anytime I work on the bike on the center stand...like, removing a wheel, I use this strap.

Put the floor jack under the FD housing, not under the brake disc. Use the jack to slowly lift the FD while you hold the driveshaft up with the wire and turn the disc a little. You can kinda tell when the spline engages the other spline...then just jack it up a little more, if it doesn't bind, you're in. Jack it a little more, then remove the wire, jack it a little more and clip the front part of the boot. Finally, put the bolt in that supports the FD. Clean up, then re-assemble everything else and you're done.

Check out Boxflyer's video on this. I think his illustrates the process pretty well..but he has a bike stand and holds the FD up by hand...It's possible, but much more difficult, especially if you have to re-try a few times...I did.

Using my floor jack (Harbor Freight) was the only way I could get it done...but it worked well. You have to do several things at once during the fiddling process, so having that extra hand to hold up the FD really helps.

I don't have a motorcycle stand. I did it sitting on the floor and just rolled my floor-jack up to the rear of the bike. Maybe leverage is better for holding the FD by hand if you have a bike stand?

Anyway, whatever works and doesn't destroy the bike in the process is fair game. Have fun!
 
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