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He was asking about street tires only.
We all kinda chipped in with all kinds of tires.
I still maintain the best street tires for the GS are the Dunlop Roadsmart 3
 

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I'm thinking of putting a set of street only tires on for the next set, what? I want high mileage and handling..........

GO???
My favs are Dunlop Road Smart 3. I'm on set 6 or 7 w/ the last 2 sets on this GS. I use them on my Ducati Monster, my last 2 RTs. Typical for me is an easy 10,000 mi. Great in the NC, SC, Ga twisties, rain no problem and mileage has been good. These don't get the flat spots (for me) like the Michelin Pilot Road 4 did. And I went through 15 -18 sets of Michelin 2,3 & 4 on 3 RTs.
 

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And if equipment was as important as you believe every swinging dick that raced motorcycle with deep pockets would be a MotoGP level racer. Every wonder why out of the 6 billion on earth there are less than 100 GP level riders. The only reasonable answer gotta be Rossi and the other GP riders can get different tires than you or I. I know it and the COVID-19 travel bans are the only 2 thing holding me back from podium finishes.
He was asking about street tires only.
We all kinda chipped in with all kinds of tires.
I still maintain the best street tires for the GS are the Dunlop Roadsmart 3
agree
 

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And if equipment was as important as you believe every swinging dick that raced motorcycle with deep pockets would be a MotoGP level racer. Every wonder why out of the 6 billion on earth there are less than 100 GP level riders. The only reasonable answer gotta be Rossi and the other GP riders can get different tires than you or I. I know it and the COVID-19 travel bans are the only 2 thing holding me back from podium finishes.
If that’s what you understood from my post, you may want to consider getting your GED, or at least taking a high school reading comprehension course.
 

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'05 R 1200 Gs
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If 15,000 to 20,000 miles out of a rear tires sounds good and only cost less than $51.00 shipped try an Achilles Economist ATR in a 175/55-17 for the rear.

I just ordered another from Walmart.com total price with tax was $50.36 shipped to my door. It was one of two left.
Isn't that an automobile tire?
 

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If that’s what you understood from my post, you may want to consider getting your GED, or at least taking a high school reading comprehension course.
If that’s what you understood from my post, you may want to consider getting your GED, or at least taking a high school reading comprehension course.
So what was you post about? You are under the belief that equipment is a bigger part of the equation. So wonder what would happen if you put a new rider on a GP bike then put a MotoGP level rider on a bone stock Ninja 300 and turned then loose on a track to battle it out. Obviously the GP spec bike is a much better purpose built piece of equipment where as the Ninja is at a 200 HP disadvantage and an is 109 MPH slower than a GP bike. Wonder who win even a 1 lap shootout? Wonder if the talent would overcome spec? I know where I'd bet my money!
 

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Is it still a automobile tire if you put it on a motorcycle :unsure:
I'll bite.

Local grocery was out of ground beef, I bought hot dogs. They were out of hot dog buns, I bought hamburger buns. I will be eating a hot dog on a hamburger bun. My situation does not turn my hot dog into a hamburger.

You sir have a car tire on a motorcycle. :)
 

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So what was you post about? You are under the belief that equipment is a bigger part of the equation. So wonder what would happen if you put a new rider on a GP bike then put a MotoGP level rider on a bone stock Ninja 300 and turned then loose on a track to battle it out. Obviously the GP spec bike is a much better purpose built piece of equipment where as the Ninja is at a 200 HP disadvantage and an is 109 MPH slower than a GP bike. Wonder who win even a 1 lap shootout? Wonder if the talent would overcome spec? I know where I'd bet my money!
Asking me what my post was about is just further proof of your need to adress your lack of reading skills. Taking from my post that I am under the belief that equipment is a bigger part of the equation is another example of your need to seek a remedial reading course or two. In the meantime, I’ll try to help you to understand what my belief as expressed in my post is using as few words as possible so it will be easy for you to understand: You need the right tool for the right job. Simple.
 

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The OP requested a street tire. I would take that as a 100/0, not a 90/10. My pick would be the Michelin Road 5 GT. I ran the 4 GT on my FJR and they stuck like glue in the wet, and handled great in the dry. The 4 GT had a very neutral roll-in for the corners. They are dual compound and had good mileage. I see they make a Michelin Road 5 Trail that is nearly identical but targeted to the ADV bike world. However, I have no experience in that tire.
 

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I have the Michelin Road 5 Trails on my GS and have put about 4K mikes on them so far. I would agree with everything you said about the GTs and with current mileage I have on them, no real signs of wear yet. Great handling tire on the GS


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
 

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Michelin Anakee Adventures. Good life, good handling plus a great grip. I hit a patch of oil on a twisty road in West virginia last summer and thought I was going down but the Adventures grabbed and kept me up.
Agreed.. actually surprised by their performance overall.. we pretty had a soggy Northeast winter with a lot of solution dumped on the roads and makes it slimy at times, we ride a lot of back roads with elevation changes (asphalt whoops) with turns on them, never lost confidence with the adventures... trust me I’m chicken shit when it comes to seeing “wet road” and get all white knuckled at times... so for sure in the cold season they’re pretty damn good
 

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I see the OP asked a question about putting road tyres on his GS, and most of the responses are about other than road tyres. In my view, if you are reasonably certain that you won't be straying from the tarmac at all (or no more than you would on a road bike), and aren't concerned about the appearance jarring with the visual purpose of the bike (wouldn't worry me, I hasten to add, but it might for some) then road tyres are surely a no-brainer. However, if you think you might very occasionally stray from the black ribbon, I think a heavily road-biased adventure type is the way to go, and am considering the same on my 1250GS. I have heard very good things about the Pirelli Scorpion Trail II (which was included in MotoModi's list above), including from the guy who just bought my 1200GS and has had them fitted.
 

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Michelin Anakee Adventures. Good life, good handling plus a great grip. I hit a patch of oil on a twisty road in West virginia last summer and thought I was going down but the Adventures grabbed and kept me up.
Sorry, I'm perpetuating a sub-thread unrelated to the original question but wanted to quickly reply. I have Anakee Adventures fitted to my 1250GS and am less convinced. I've had the rear step sideways slightly at unexpected times, though I would certainly not rule out rider error; however, I rarely had such issues in the Anakee IIIs fitted to my 1200. Also the Adventures are extremely noisy (as were the IIIs in fairness). I dare say they are competent on trails, though.
 

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I see the OP asked a question about putting road tyres on his GS, and most of the responses are about other than road tyres. In my view, if you are reasonably certain that you won't be straying from the tarmac at all (or no more than you would on a road bike), and aren't concerned about the appearance jarring with the visual purpose of the bike (wouldn't worry me, I hasten to add, but it might for some) then road tyres are surely a no-brainer. However, if you think you might very occasionally stray from the black ribbon, I think a heavily road-biased adventure type is the way to go, and am considering the same on my 1250GS. I have heard very good things about the Pirelli Scorpion Trail II (which was included in MotoModi's list above), including from the guy who just bought my 1200GS and has had them fitted.
I have no problems putting pure street tires on my GSA because 99% of my riding is on pavement. Iv'e used PR4s for that purpose and thought highly of them. I expect I'll be putting on Road 5s when replacing the Anakee Adventures that came with the bike. I've used others when traveling to Alaska or the trans-Lab because I knew the pavement was going to be poor or occasionally absent, mostly TKC70 and once K60 Scouts (which surprised me with how good they were, bad press about being terrible in the wet notwithstanding. And yes, they bump at low speeds because they're full knobbies after all, and yes they wear like iron.).

I didn't particularly care for the set of Pirelli Scorpion Trail IIs I tried, I thought the ride was harsher than Michelin or Conti, perhaps because the sidewall is stiffer?


Sorry, I'm perpetuating a sub-thread unrelated to the original question but wanted to quickly reply. I have Anakee Adventures fitted to my 1250GS and am less convinced. I've had the rear step sideways slightly at unexpected times, though I would certainly not rule out rider error; however, I rarely had such issues in the Anakee IIIs fitted to my 1200. Also the Adventures are extremely noisy (as were the IIIs in fairness). I dare say they are competent on trails, though.
I experienced some tar snake squirreliness with Anakee Adventures as well, my first on Michelin tires. Not a fan. My mission now is to finish wearing them out as quickly as possible so I can put on some Road 5s :).
 

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Thank goodness there are so many good choices and whatever you pick is ultimately disposable. You can't beat a Stinko 705 for value. Both Dunlop and Michelin make great sport touring tires (a few others as well but those two I have a lot of experience with). And finally, all that advice in this thread about ADV tires has been made obsolete by the new Dunlop Trailmax Mission tires. They've somehow pulled off a magic trick with a tire that can be railed on in the twisties, is quiet on the open road, and hooks up like a TKC80/Wild off the pavement. The only thing left to find out about these tires is how long they last with me riding my 1200GS in a 70/20/10 mode - 70% road/touring, 20% hooligan, 10% off the pavement on mostly groomed forest roads.
 
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