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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
I've been running what the manual specifies 36/32 but the BMW tech said that is way too low. He says 42/40 if I was spending 90% on the asphalt. Adventure, spoke wheels,Bridgestone BW-501/502 Battle Wing tires.
What are all of you running?
Thanks
 

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And the Tech is a tire expert?

I listen to the tire manufacturer myself. I've been using conti tires and they have a very-hard-to-navigate web page which eventually led to recommendations as to what they believe is the best pressure for their tires when mounted on my bike.

Without tire manufacturer input I'd likely listen to what BMW has to say.

What I, joe-tech, ricky-racer, or random internet expert has to say is likely meaningless drivel. There are probably a few who actually know what they are talking about, but how can you tell?
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Interesting, I took your advice and went to the Bridgestone website. I found a max psi of 41, which is closer in line with what the tech told me than what the manual states.
095158 150/70R17M/C 17 BW502R BW TL - 69V V 25.4 6.1 9 (4.0)3.50-4.50 716 41 BMW R1200GS 2007-2008
 

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tire pressures & web sites

I ran the BMW numbers in the OEM Anakees and got 10k on them before the rear was too flat spotted to be any fun.

On the Tourances I had been running the 33 / 37 front / rear (I round up) but the tech said he ran 36 / 42 in Tourances, which is the BMW two up setting. Lo and behold the Metler web page says the same thing. I like Jake at Country Rode (sorry for the shameless plug).

BTW, if the web site says that the MAX is 41psi then I would say that is the maximum in any case and you want to be something less than that.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Yea, I assumed that would be for 2up situations. I'm going to try 35/38 in them and will see how she performs this weekend.
 

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2013 R 1200 GS Tire Pressure

I have temporary custody of a 2013 R 1200 GS LC bike without any of the documentation… Could anyone please tell me the recommended tire pressures?
 

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DON'T go with the max pressure, why would you want to do that? You will wear the tire out in no time that way.

For road use go with what the BMW manual recommends.

Not sure why anyone is running their GS on the road and proper off road is going to around 25 psi.
 

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My 2015 manual says 36.3 front, 42.1 rear (cold).
I run my Anakees at 37 and 44, to give an extra month before I have to check them. They lose about 1 to 2 lbs. a month.

This has produced 7,000 on the rear and 13,000 on the front....twice.

One thing most don't pay attention to is that the manual states the tires should be checked at EXACTLY 68 degrees F. The further away from this temp you are at the so-called cold check, the more wrong the actual pressure may be.

At 80F, for instance, the correct pressure will be something like 38/45. (In the garage!) Luckily for me my garage is close to 70F.:D
 

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Hi All,

I ride 2014 1200 GSA LC and carry approx. 100-110 lbs gear. I run air pressure 28 PSI front/34 rear all the time without issue on my Full knobby TKC80 tires - just enough in front to prevent error code. And get about 4000-4500 miles on a set. Have had a few rock strikes on rear wheel and out of round measurement at 0.30-.040 inch. PS If you run road exclusively would recommend 34 front/38 rear. Just put new Michelin Wild tires on and dealer had inflated to 40 front/40 rear when swapped out.

M
 

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On probably my 15th set of tourances. I run 38-40 front and 42 rear. I get about 14k in front and 12k out of the rear. All on road longish trips. The bike is loaded but I only weigh 153 lbs.
 

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Would love to get 4,000 out of my TKC80! Wore out two sets in one week this February. 800 miles all of road. So that's about 400 a set. Although I could have gone further on the front tires. It was the rears that was toast.
 

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Look on the tire. They stamp the recomended pressure right on the tire. they did that just for me because I have CRS and can't ever remember the car, truck, bike, tractor, quad tire pressures.
 

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Look on the tire. They stamp the recomended pressure right on the tire. they did that just for me because I have CRS and can't ever remember the car, truck, bike, tractor, quad tire pressures.
Tires are stamped with the MAX PSI that the tire can be filled to when cold, this is NOT the Recommended Tire pressure and often times will result in poor ride quality, handling and reduced tire life.

Bikes and cars have decals showing the recommended tire pressures and that is a great place to start, tire pressures are not an exact science and what one person likes another may hate.
A wise Michelin rep told me to use the manufactured recommended pressures but it is acceptable to vary it by up to +/- 10% depending on what suited me when using tires on-road.
 

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I've heard that information a bit differently from a Michelin tech. The pressure stamped on the side of the tire is the pressure at which the tire has it's best load carrying ability. Any more pressure than that does not increase the load it can carry.

It's hard to argue against going with what's stamped on the swing arm of your bike. However, my feeling on that is that is the pressure BMW engineers (and lawyers) want in the tire when the bike is fully loaded at it's max vehicle weight. If you buy in to that assumption, then does it not make sense that you'd get better performance and tire life from the tires running a slightly lower pressure if the bike is not fully at its max weight?

How many of us are wearing out out tires in the middles? Is that situation made better or worse by inflating the tire to the swing arm listed pressure vs. say, about 10% less?

My personal data for this rationale comes from having three different BMW bikes, an S1000RR, K1600GT, and the 1200GS LC. I've gotten great performance on all these bikes running pressures less than recommended by the manual or swing arm sticker. The 1600GT recommended 42/42. I ran that bike for tens of thousands of miles at 38/38. My S1000RR recommended 36 front/42 rear. The dunlop tech (and California Superbike school) recommends 31F/29R for the track and I ran 3 psi more for the street on each end. On my GS running TKC80 tires, I run them in the mid-20's off road and in the mid-30s on road.

I have the pro mode plug in mine and run it in Enduro Pro off-road. That mode turns off the tire warnings on the dash in the acknowledgement that riding off-road will typically have the tires aired down below their alarm thresholds.

My advice is to do whatever puts your mind at ease but don't sweat a few psi here and there.
 

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I have been riding for over 46 years now and tyre pressures are a bit of a dark art/science in much the same way as tyre choice itself. I have always used the manufacturer's recommendation as a starting point or guide. I then experiment to suit my riding style and go with what feels about right. I have always gotten great mileage out of my tyres (by and large) - with the odd exception! The manner in which you ride makes the greatest difference.
On my 16 GSA I have settled on 42 rear and 38 front on Tourance Nexts. That feels about right for me and I only do on road long distance touring stuff mainly.
 
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