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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
For ADV riding, I believe the TKC 80's are the gold standard when it come to traction both on and off blacktop. The biggest drawback it tire life. I get between 3,000 and if gentle up to 4,000 miles, therefore I go though 3 or 4 rear tires a year.

This year, I'm trying the TKC 70 Rocks on the rear and a TKC 80 in the front. I'm hoping to get double the miles without giving up too much traction off blacktop.

They are well named because they are as hard as a rock when trying to mount. It it by far the hardest tire I have ever mounted. The body of the tire has so much hard rubber it does not want to bend into the drop center if the rim. I got it done but it took over twice the time it normally takes.

While riding this weekend, I could feel how stiff the tire is. Soft tires allow for more flexibility therefore are better self cleaning. These tires may clog easily. I didn't ride any mud this weekend so I'll find out later. I did ride a couple hundred miles on gravel and dirt and numerous water crossing. They handled that terrain better then I expected. I never felt the tire loose grip that I didn't expect in corners or while accelerating/breaking. It is a small sample so far but I'm pleased.

Later this month, I'm meeting Bill Conger (former head BMW Performance Center instructor) for a four day, advanced, off blacktop class. I'll know a lot more about the tire after spending time with him and a total of 6 days mostly off blacktop getting to and from the class.
 

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For ADV riding, I believe the TKC 80's are the gold standard when it come to traction both on and off blacktop. The biggest drawback it tire life. I get between 3,000 and if gentle up to 4,000 miles, therefore I go though 3 or 4 rear tires a year.

This year, I'm trying the TKC 70 Rocks on the rear and a TKC 80 in the front. I'm hoping to get double the miles without giving up too much traction off blacktop.

They are well named because they are as hard as a rock when trying to mount. It it by far the hardest tire I have ever mounted. The body of the tire has so much hard rubber it does not want to bend into the drop center if the rim. I got it done but it took over twice the time it normally takes.

While riding this weekend, I could feel how stiff the tire is. Soft tires allow for more flexibility therefore are better self cleaning. These tires may clog easily. I didn't ride any mud this weekend so I'll find out later. I did ride a couple hundred miles on gravel and dirt and numerous water crossing. They handled that terrain better then I expected. I never felt the tire loose grip that I didn't expect in corners or while accelerating/breaking. It is a small sample so far but I'm pleased.

Later this month, I'm meeting Bill Conger (former head BMW Performance Center instructor) for a four day, advanced, off blacktop class. I'll know a lot more about the tire after spending time with him and a total of 6 days mostly off blacktop getting to and from the class.
Looking forward to your future comments on the tire mixing.
I just posted about adding a more aggressive front tire to my Dunlop Trailmax Mission rear because I found the Dunlop Trailmax Mission front tends to slide when off road.
I think the Dunlop Trailmax Mission and the TKC 70 Rocks are of similar profiles?
 

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My riding buddy has had the TKC70 Rocks for the past few thousand miles. Likes them a lot, but doesn't venture much past gravel. Thinks they perform better than Anakee Adventures that came on the 1250.

For truly "in the dirt" performance I think the TKC80 front and Mitas E07+ rear is the best combo for tire life. Loved knobby rears but hated the short life too. E07+ still won't match the life of the Trailmax Mission or TKC70 Rocks.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Looking forward to your future comments on the tire mixing.
I just posted about adding a more aggressive front tire to my Dunlop Trailmax Mission rear because I found the Dunlop Trailmax Mission front tends to slide when off road.
I think the Dunlop Trailmax Mission and the TKC 70 Rocks are of similar profiles?
Last year, one of my buddies had Trailmax's front and rear. He had the same problem with the front. Got back from a short trip and put TKC80 on front. He joined me on part of my Pony Express ride where we encountered a major section of mud about 10 miles long. His was very happy with the combination.

The bike on the left has the combo. It is standing without a kickstand.

 

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Last year, one of my buddies had Trailmax's front and rear. He had the same problem with the front. Got back from a short trip and put TKC80 on front. He joined me on part of my Pony Express ride where we encountered a major section of mud about 10 miles long. His was very happy with the combination.

The bike on the left has the combo. It is standing without a kickstand.

Thanks for the info @ajayhawkfan (y)
 

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Last year, one of my buddies had Trailmax's front and rear. He had the same problem with the front. Got back from a short trip and put TKC80 on front. He joined me on part of my Pony Express ride where we encountered a major section of mud about 10 miles long. His was very happy with the combination.

The bike on the left has the combo. It is standing without a kickstand.

Impressive the TMM does that well in mud, looking at the tread pattern doesn't appear it would be that good. Proof is in the experience.
 
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