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A high end pro mechanic will always have torgue wrenches tested and the
testing agency will placard with a sticky on the wrench showing the
actual readings from the test. For more info Google "Torque Wrench Testing"

This is especially important in engine rebuilding. Chassis work probably
not so critical./QUOTE]

Torque wrenches can vary in accuracy initially (cheaper vs more expensive) but most are probably within a safe range. Over time this can change with either and anyone doing critical work has their wrench tested and verified, even when new. I whole heartedly agree with pdxmccgs....A lot of fasteners don't require precision torque, just enough to provide fastening and too little to avoid stripping threads. Bearing caps, head bolts and the like require an accurate verified torque value application. A major source of income for a couple of machine shops I had was broken (torque sheared) bolts and stripped threads. Thread classes are derived from formulas which the pitch diameter tolerances are based on increments of the major (nominal) diameter, the pitch, and the length of engagement of the thread. Critical applications have tighter tolerances and more need for torque precision. Less critical applications tolerances are loosened and torque values require less precision. Own a couple of ranges and use the one appropriate to the fastener you are working with. Don't fuss over testing wrenches used for slap it on components, just avoid ruining the fastener. For engine work or other critical high tolerance thread class materials and applications, use a verified tool.
 

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I've found the ACDelco digital adapter my go to torque wrench. My other torque wrenches just sit in the tool box unloved. https://www.amazon.com/ACDelco-ARM602-3-Digital-Adapter-Audible/dp/B004VYUKTC
No experience with these but AC Delco is owned by General Motors and manufactures not only GM parts but aftermarket parts as well. Probably Chinese made which may or may not be OK. Would I use an AC Delco digital torque meter in critical applications without testing, nope. Do I think it's a nifty advance in torque measurement technology, yup. Would its bulk get in the way of some jobs, probably.
 
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