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With the large range of torque settings for the numerous bolts and screws on the GSA, has anyone found one torque wrench that will work for all, or do you own two, a small and mid-size wrench?
 

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With the large range of torque settings for the numerous bolts and screws on the GSA, has anyone found one torque wrench that will work for all, or do you own two, a small and mid-size wrench?
I own three (3) torque wrenches and 99.9% of the time they all stay in the tool box.
 
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With two 2 torque wrenches, you can get most of the fasteners by the book. Get a good 3/8" and 1/2" drive.

Some experienced mechanics boast they can torque correctly by the feeling... I run away from places not using torque wrenches on all the fastener where a torque is specified.

If they have to work in the motor, I ask to see the calibration certificates.
 

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I have found 1 will do that job. I used it every time I reinstall a wheel.
On my 2009, both 3/8" and 1/2" drive are needed to replace the front wheel. My 1/2" drive can not go low enough for the axle clamp (lower setting is 20 Pound/Ft)

What is the range of your torque wrench ?

Rear wheel
T50, 60 Nm (44 Pound/Ft) Same value for both cast and spoked wheel

Front wheel
Axle : 50 Nm (37 Pound/Ft))
Axle clamp : 19 Nm (168 Pound/In) or 14 Pound/Ft)

Brake caliper (must remove one to place wheel) : 30 Nm (266 Pound/In or 22 Pound/Ft)
 

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With two 2 torque wrenches, you can get most of the fasteners by the book. Get a good 3/8" and 1/2" drive.

Some experienced mechanics boast they can torque correctly by the feeling... I run away from places not using torque wrenches on all the fastener where a torque is specified.

If they have to work in the motor, I ask to see the calibration certificates.
Every fastener has a torque spec.

I think you'll find the most "experienced mechanics" do not boast about not needing a torque wrench they simply do not use them for every single fastener, and you never even know it.
 
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I use 2 torque wrenches. One for lower values and other for higher. Torque wrenches are most accurate in the middle of their range.
 
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To make sure my point is clear, I do not torque generic fasteners, body panels, screws, etc. I torque only when a value is specified in the manufacturer procedures (even if they provide a chart for the generic fasteners).
 

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I have three up to 25Nm, 100Nm and 200Nm. In the service manual is written all about every one fastener. Only one that I miss is one of the bolt close/around battery that is 2Nm, smallest value that I have is 5Nm, but this is not so critical. Main Idea about using of torque wrench is when tight group of bolts/ nuts for example engine head, car wheel or so, all of them to be with equal force. Even wrench to be out of spec with 1-2 Nm above/ below, they will be again with equal force tightened.
 

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To make sure my point is clear, I do not torque generic fasteners, body panels, screws, etc. I torque only when a value is specified in the manufacturer procedures (even if they provide a chart for the generic fasteners).
Oh.....so you work like most "experienced mechanics" and do not torque EVERY fastener to spec even though every fastener has a torque spec.?? I mean you've said it both ways:unsure:


"Some experienced mechanics boast they can torque correctly by the feeling... I run away from places not using torque wrenches on all the fastener where a torque is specified."

"I do not torque generic fasteners, body panels, screws, etc. I torque only when a value is specified in the manufacturer procedures (even if they provide a chart for the generic fasteners)".
 

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Oh.....so you work like most "experienced mechanics" and do not torque EVERY fastener to spec even though every fastener has a torque spec.?? I mean you've said it both ways:unsure:


"Some experienced mechanics boast they can torque correctly by the feeling... I run away from places not using torque wrenches on all the fastener where a torque is specified."

"I do not torque generic fasteners, body panels, screws, etc. I torque only when a value is specified in the manufacturer procedures (even if they provide a chart for the generic fasteners)".
Geez people!!!! The OP asked about the number of torque wrenches required. Stop the pissing matches!!
To the OP, I have a 3/8" drive torque wrench which handles the larger torque values but only goes down to 20 ft-lbs. So, for the smaller torques, I use an inch-pound torque wrench and just convert the values from N-m. I created a sheet of torque values that shows each value in N-m., ft-lbs., and inch-lbs.
 

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Geez people!!!! The OP asked about the number of torque wrenches required. Stop the pissing matches!!
To the OP, I have a 3/8" drive torque wrench which handles the larger torque values but only goes down to 20 ft-lbs. So, for the smaller torques, I use an inch-pound torque wrench and just convert the values from N-m. I created a sheet of torque values that shows each value in N-m., ft-lbs., and inch-lbs.
The reality is depending on what the OP is going or wanting to do he may not even need a torque wrench. If he going to do routine maintenance like oil (engine, trans, rear drive) and bleed brakes, brake pads, valve checks there is no need for a torque wrench. If he going to do more than routine maintenance, then maybe he'd need one or three different sizes/range torque wrenches. Not knowing what the OP wants to perform makes it hard to say what he may need.
 

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The reality is depending on what the OP is going or wanting to do he may not even need a torque wrench. If he going to do routine maintenance like oil (engine, trans, rear drive) and bleed brakes, brake pads, valve checks there is no need for a torque wrench. If he going to do more than routine maintenance, then maybe he'd need one or three different sizes/range torque wrenches. Not knowing what the OP wants to perform makes it hard to say what he may need.
Routine maintenance includes front wheels, rear wheels, valve adjustments, spark plugs, handlebar adjustments, removing and installing crash bars, etc. Engine, trans, and final drive plugs all have torque specs. Pretty sure you should use a torque wrench on most routine maintenance, for values from 4 N-m to 65 N-m.
 

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Routine maintenance includes front wheels, rear wheels, valve adjustments, spark plugs, handlebar adjustments, removing and installing crash bars, etc. Engine, trans, and final drive plugs all have torque specs. Pretty sure you should use a torque wrench on most routine maintenance, for values from 4 N-m to 65 N-m.
out of you list of maintenance items the only thing I routinely use a torque wrench on is the rear wheel lugs. Not sure why maybe from the aluminum hub days when over torquing the lugs would crack the boss. The rest of the items you list I do not use a torque wrench on a simply tighten by feel.
 

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This is a very good topic that I'd like to add to. I'm a retired journeyman industrial millwright and had always used beam style torque wrenches until I ended up working in a Nuclear plant, they use click style with the calibration checked yearly, but also when you returned the tool to the tool crib a quick check was done there to make sure the tool was still in spec.....a way to confirm the high pressure flange your just torqued was done correctly.

I have 3 click style torque wrenches at home, a 1/2" (ftlbs), a 3/8" (inlbs), and a 1/4" (inlbs). My 3/8" inch lbs doesn't go high enough, and the 1/2" ftlbs doesn't go low enough for a lot of jobs, even though the scale may go down to 20ftlbs, doesn't mean that its accurate at the low end, ditto for the high end.

One day I decided to check my 1/2" torque wrench, I set it for 70ftlbs and it tested at 60, 10lbs light!!! This was the wrench I use for my rear wheel bolts. I corrected the wrench, but no longer trust it, (Nappa Purchase).

I've since bought a used Snap On digital 3/8" wrench, that is good from 5 - 100 ftlbs. I've tested it and its accurate. This will be my go to wrench for 90% of the work I do. My 1/2" Nappa will be used solely for changing car and truck tires, My 1/4" for spoke tightening and other light work.

My long winded reply is buy a high end digital torque wrench, such as Snap On, Rigid, Milwaukee, etc. Stay away from Amazon off shore purchases, (junk). I bought used for $125.00 US, much cheaper than $400.00 new and if required Snap ON will service and calibrate for less than $100.00. The high end brands are better made, and repairable.

brian
 

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It's easy enough check torque wrenches. All you need is an inexpensive luggage scale.

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Watched the YouTube videos. Calibration looks easy. Seems to be putting a lot of faith in the accuracy of $5.99 piece of Chinese junk to check another more expensive piece of chinese junk! Kind of makes you laugh. If you did this procedure on a new Snap-On torque wrench, and the scale said it was off, would you believe it, or trust the wrench? I'd trust the wrench.
 
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