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I took my rear tire off the wheel (Motoz Tractionator GPS), but I am completely unable to get it to re-bead after trying for an entire day. I used a heavy duty ratchet strap to crank down all along the center circumfrance of the tire, then hit it will my air compressor at 100 psi, but it simply won't go on the bead. I tried spraying some window cleaner around the bead area, with no luck. It seems like there is one portion in particular that doesn't want to go on the bead. I have no idea what else I can possibly do.

I was able to get the front to re-bead without even using a ratchet strap. I just sort of pushed the bead into position and hit it with the air compressor, and it popped.

The tire is from 2018, so its about four years old now. Is there some magic trick or are these things simply too old and stiff to get back on? I don't want to put a completely excessive amount of force on the wheel either, as these are light weight spoked wheels...not steel truck wheels.
 

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If I get your post correctly, the tires seals against the rim (no air getting out) but even after putting 100 psi inside it did not pop back in place.

If it's the case, try cleaning tire and rim, then get some real tire soap (a local tire garage can sell/give you some). Once the tire hold the air, remove the strap around to let the tire expand to it's full size before raising the pressure.

Don't forget to let the tire bask in the sun a few hours before to get it really warm (uncomfortable to the touch).
 

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20-100 offers good advice. In addition, I have used spray silicone twice in the hundreds of tires I’ve charged to get a bead to seat on a rim. Worked well both times. This is of course a solution if the bead is holding air but will not seat.

If the bead will not hold air, then one solution is an air tank that will release 100 PSI all at once. It has a narrow opening that allows the air to be directed into the tire. I use it rarely but it works well. I am not suggesting you buy one, but tire shops often have one.
 

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I have a small 3 gallon pancake compressor and while it has the pressure it does not have the volume of air needed to rapidly push the tire bead against the wheel bead so it can start to seal and take on air. I have had one brand/model of tire that on several different bikes was the same where i could not get the bead to start to seat. I tried all the tricks like ratchet straps, lubricants and still nadda. Ended up taking it to a garage where they had a large compressor with plenty of volume to get the job done. After the second time I invested in knockoff Bead Cheetah like Pterodactyl posted and it couple with a small compressor makes what was once an enormous issue a non issue.

Just used it again on a set of lawn mower tires that the air compressor could not handle. Fill the CH-5 up to 30 PSI point it at the bead, clip on the air chuck to the valve stem, step on the foot pedal to start dispensing air and fly the valve open. 1 second later tire is sealed and taking on air.
 

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I almost exclusively run MotoZ tires. My seating the bead problems went away when I did the following. When the tire is off the rim I thoroughly clean the inside of the wheel. And then I lubricate the whole wheel and not just where the bead sits. Now that the tire bead can easily slide into place, it does this so easily that I don’t even hear a pop.
It has completely eliminated any issue with the bead not wanting to seat.
 

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Riding a 2009 R1200gs
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Virkdoc idea of taking the valve core off is excellent
Zubb idea of cleaning/lubricating all the tire is also great
 

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Virkdoc idea of taking the valve core off is excellent
Zubb idea of cleaning/lubricating all the tire is also great
As long as you have an "open flow" air chuck that does not require the Schrader/valve core to be installed to dispense air like a regular air chuck does its a good idea. But if you remove the Schrader and then try and fill with a regular chuck no air will pass.
 
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not to state the obvious but do have the valve core removed ????
But again if the valve core is removed and you are not using an "open flow" chuck no air will flow. Most people have a standard air chuck that the Schrader has to be installed to allow air to flow.
 

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But If you don’t have the proper tools why would you expect things to go smoothly.

just sayin
out of the almost 400 tires I’ve installed there have been 4 or 5 that were problematic in getting the bead to start seating. At a 1% chance most DIY will never experience this and because of the volume of tires I change I did get the right tool for the job.

99% of the folks will get by with a small compressor and a standard chuck never knowing there is more out there.
 

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So you have changed 400 + tires ? now your having a problem with this Particular one. Seems like we should be asking you for tire advice .
Good luck I hope someone on this forum can help .
 

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So you have changed 400 + tires ? now your having a problem with this Particular one. Seems like we should be asking you for tire advice .
Good luck I hope someone on this forum can help .
Nope not 400+… almost 400 and not “now” having problems, “Had” problems with Michelin PP 4’s. After the second problematic front made an adjustment in my tire tools too address the issue and no more problems.
 

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I don’t know maybe Set it in the hot sun for a couple hrs and try it while it’s hot .
I’m just a DIYnot a professional by any means .
Yawn....Great but what do you do when its the dead of winter?
 

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I use road racing tire warmers. They get tires too hot to handle. Makes a big difference.

I have a pneumatic/electric tire changer. I’ve been changing tires since I was a teenager. Don’t know how many, but it is a bunch.

Remember heat and lubrication…. It’s not just for sex anymore.
 

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I’ve done close to a couple dozen motorcycle tires now and probably don’t have the answer to such an extraordinary case. I use silicone, spray or paste. I also bounce the wheel a few times all around, just to allow everything to settle into place, before inflation. The latter is a habit from mounting tubed bicycle wheels, where you want to allow the partially inflated tube to get rid of any accidental folds before adding full pressure.

If tires have been transported flattened, then a tourniquet made out of rope and a stick works well and I am guessing may be more effective (more ruthless) than a ratchet strap. I’ve only needed this for trailer tires.
 
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