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Discussion Starter #1
My '06 lives in a climate controlled garage (battery tender always attached), and gets fluid changes and maintenance every two years. I only have 5,075 miles on it. When I bought it I was still riding a lot, but had three bikes. Shortly thereafter, my riding group disappeared. Two found golf and stopped riding, two people moved, and the only female in the group got married, and her new hubby didn't want her riding. I don't ride much at all in the summer (too hot and humid and won't ride unless all gear is on). Recently found a buddy to ride with. Neither of us knew we rode and we both ride GS's.

The shop that takes care of my bike (local dealer is lousy, so I won't use them) told me he doesn't believe that the final drive fluid needs to be changed. I don't know enough to make the call on that based on time or miles. Should I have it changed, and if so what should it cost?

Thanks
 

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Its so easy, I do it every time I change my oil.
I think its recommended every 6k and each dealer is different.
Where you located mafpolo?
 

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I change the transmission and rear drive oils at 10,000 mile intervals. Engine oil/filter at 5,000 mile intervals. Makes it easy to look at the odometer and see when service is due especially with mutiple bikes.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
What about on a time basis versus mileage, so if you didn't ride that many miles, such as in my case?
 

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I think the actual interval is 12,000 miles. Doing sooner on miles not bad given ease to do and cost of final drive failure. You should lube the driveshaft spines while you are there.

Time probably does not matter as much. Every two years probably is plenty.
 

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I think the actual interval is 12,000 miles. Doing sooner on miles not bad given ease to do and cost of final drive failure. You should lube the driveshaft spines while you are there.

Time probably does not matter as much. Every two years probably is plenty.
The services all the oils is I believe at 6,000 mile intervals. The only reason I skinny'ed up 1,000 mile is for ease of remembrance. 5,000, 10,000, 15,000, 20,000 is easier to remember 6,000, 12,000, 18,000, 24,000, 30,000....

As for the final drive oil if you don't get the mileage I'd say every two years is a safe bet to change it. Heck a quart of 75W-140 at Walmart is less than $13 and is enough to do the transmission 700-800cc and 180cc for the rear drive.

The rear dive on the earlier GS's since there is no drain plug at the bottom yo have to:

1. Remove the rear wheel
2. Remove the speedo sensor to allow the rear drive to hinge down and expose the fill hole
3. Remove the rear caliper and tie it and the speedo sensor up and ou of the way
4. Remove the drain/overflow plug located at about 9 o-clock on the back of the drive housing.
5. Ready a catch can
6. Remove the bolt on the trailing arm to allow the rear drive to pivot downward.
6a. Rotate the rear drive downward (exposing the drive splines) and allow all the old oil to drain out.
7. While that is happening insect the rubber boot, replace if needed
8. Clean up the splines on the rear drive and the drive shaft and inspect for wear. Apply a moly paste spline lube to the male and female splines.
9. Inspect h erear caliper and clean up with a shot of brake cleaner (if all gunked up).
10. Inspect the pads for wear replace if needed
11. Reinstall rubber boot and swing the rear drive up make sure the splines are engaged (there are tutorials on this )
12. Reinstall the bolt in the trailing arm and tighten
13. Reinstall the plug in the rear of the housing
14. Using a small funnel fill the drive with 180cc's of 75W-140 full synthetic gear oil. I use a 60cc syringe with a small section of hose attached. Draw in 60cc of oil and squirt it in the fill hole. Repeat tice more.
15. Reinstall the speedo sensor
16. Reinstall the caliper
17. Reinstall the rear wheel and torque the lugs to 44 ft/lbs

The beauty is a simply rear drive oil change is you also took care of several other maintenance tasks. Caliper and brake pad inspection as well as lubing 1/2 the splines and inspecting the rubber boot.
 

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From one of the more unreliable sources...Haynes... :)

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Whether 6/10/12,000 I agree with @PerazziMx14 that it is so cheap it is silly not to do it. If you really want fun this winter take the swingarm off and grease the bearings...not a terribly hard job to do and allows to grease the front driveshaft splines too.
 

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On my 2009, I do it every year during the non-riding winter season (I'm Canadian). At the same time, I do the transmission oil (same oil, a 1 litre container is enough for both).

Greasing the splines and inspecting at the same time.

It's more anecdotal than scientific but my 2009 have 107000 Km without any transmission or final drive issues.
 

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From one of the more unreliable sources...Haynes... :)


Whether 6/10/12,000 I agree with @PerazziMx14 that it is so cheap it is silly not to do it. If you really want fun this winter take the swingarm off and grease the bearings...not a terribly hard job to do and allows to grease the front driveshaft splines too.
I just pulled the swingarm on my new to me 2009 GSA on Thursday. Took 3 hours soup to nuts and that accounts for doing a couple of MS Teams meetings for work a little extra cleaning and working at a slow pace becaseu It was hot.

In February I pulled the swingarm on the 05 GS and late fall of 2019 I did the one on the 07. Here's the 09. For the record if you need pivot bearings they are 30203 bearings. These will not be rubber sealed like the stock bearings but are a lot less expensive than "factory" SKF and last just as long.

I like to take pics for record. That way hen I sell the buyer can be as informed as possible.

If you're going to pull the swingarm its a good idea to have two new bearings handy just in case. If you don't have them on hand the bearing dogs will eff with you and make sure are least one will need replaced. then your bike will be in piece for a week while yo wait for parts to come in.

Spline1.jpg
Spline2.jpg
Spline3.jpg
 
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